My great grandfather x 4, John J. Barger. Confederate Army

Joined
Jun 15, 2018
Messages
24
Location
San Antonio, Texas
#1
Discovered a few years ago that my great, great, great, great grandfather was John J. Barger of the Confederate Army. Ancestry.com lists his service records as such:

Enlisted in Company H, Virginia 4th Infantry Regiment on 20 Apr 1861.Enlisted in Company Preston's, Virginia 7th Cavalry Regiment on 16 Apr 1862.Mustered out on 22 Sep 1862.Transferred to Company D, Virginia 14th Cavalry Regiment on 22 Sep 1862.

I am just getting into the Civil War and find this fascinating; digging back through my family history. From what I recall, he took a wound at Manassas and joined the cavalry after. But that's my knowledge aside from that. He applied for a pension in 1900 and died in 1903. The pension form is hard to read.

Going by the units he was attached to, what would you all happen to know about his military service? I believe he was at Gettysburg but cannot confirm.

Wade
pension1900.png

9723427_138585062080.jpg
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,318
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#2
Discovered a few years ago that my great, great, great, great grandfather was John J. Barger of the Confederate Army. Ancestry.com lists his service records as such:

Enlisted in Company H, Virginia 4th Infantry Regiment on 20 Apr 1861.Enlisted in Company Preston's, Virginia 7th Cavalry Regiment on 16 Apr 1862.Mustered out on 22 Sep 1862.Transferred to Company D, Virginia 14th Cavalry Regiment on 22 Sep 1862.

I am just getting into the Civil War and find this fascinating; digging back through my family history. From what I recall, he took a wound at Manassas and joined the cavalry after. But that's my knowledge aside from that. He applied for a pension in 1900 and died in 1903. The pension form is hard to read.

Going by the units he was attached to, what would you all happen to know about his military service? I believe he was at Gettysburg but cannot confirm.

Wade
View attachment 291874
View attachment 291875
Great research !
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,318
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#3
Discovered a few years ago that my great, great, great, great grandfather was John J. Barger of the Confederate Army. Ancestry.com lists his service records as such:

Enlisted in Company H, Virginia 4th Infantry Regiment on 20 Apr 1861.Enlisted in Company Preston's, Virginia 7th Cavalry Regiment on 16 Apr 1862.Mustered out on 22 Sep 1862.Transferred to Company D, Virginia 14th Cavalry Regiment on 22 Sep 1862.

I am just getting into the Civil War and find this fascinating; digging back through my family history. From what I recall, he took a wound at Manassas and joined the cavalry after. But that's my knowledge aside from that. He applied for a pension in 1900 and died in 1903. The pension form is hard to read.

Going by the units he was attached to, what would you all happen to know about his military service? I believe he was at Gettysburg but cannot confirm.

Wade
View attachment 291874
View attachment 291875
He would have been at Cedar Mountain with the 7th Va. Cavalry. Served under William E. "Grumble" Jones from s.w. Virginia, near my home in east Tennessee.

Seventh Virginia Cavalry


Cedar Mountain, VA after action report:

No. 66.

Report of Col. William E. Jones, Seventh Virginia Cavalry.

ORANGE COURT-HOUSE, VA.
August 14, 1862.
SIR: I have the honor to report that on the 9th instantly my regiment was
ordered on a reconnaissance near Madison Court-House. The march of 25
miles was made by sundown and without incident or discovery worthy of
record. On returning to camp we first learned that the battle of Cedar Run
had been progressing the greater part of the day, and moved on without a
moment's delay to the scene of action. Not being able to see you or Gen.
Jackson, by the advice of Gen. Hill I passed between the brigades of
Gen. Field and Early about dark for the purpose of pressing the enemy
in retreat. After turning the woods on our right I came on the enemy, drawn
up in such order and force as rendered a charge exceedingly dangerous.
Holding our post for observation, couriers were sent to inform a battery
sending out shells of inquiry of the position of the enemy. Before our
artillery could be brought to bear a body of cavalry threatened us, but a
gallant charge on our part soon caused them to take shelter under their
infantry. We killed one of their horses. Now our artillery commenced
shelling the position of the enemy, causing them to retire, and we followed
as soon as we could safely from our own shell. A negro servant of an officer
was captured near this point, from whom we gained the first information of
the arrival of Gen. Sigel's force on the field. This intelligence was at once
sent to the rear. The fierce cannonade, probably from the guns of this
command newly arrived, swept the ground immediately in our rear, and
compelled us to seek the shelter of a friendly hill until they had sufficiently
amused themselves. The result of our advance was 11 privates, 3 lieutenant,
and 1 negro captured from the enemy.

My thanks are due to Mr. Thomas Richards, independent scout, and to
Lieut. McCarty, acting adjutant of the regiment, for their activity, zeal,
and courage displayed on this occasion.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. E. JONES,
Col. Seventh Virginia Cavalry.

Gen. B. H. ROBERTSON.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 239-16 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. [CHAP. XXIV.
[Series I. Vol. 12. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 16.]

*************************************************************************
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,318
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#5
Wow! Thank you so much. This is awesome!




Very Welcome !

grumble  jones.jpg



Brigadier-General William E. Jones

Brigadier-General William E. Jones was born near Glade Spring,
Washington county, Va., in May, 1824. He was educated at
Emory and Henry college and at West Point, and began service
in the United States army with the rank of brevet second
lieutenant in the class of 1848.

In 1847 he had received from Emory and Henry college the
degree of master of arts. His connection with the old army
continued until his resignation in 1857, he then having the
rank of first lieutenant, mounted rifles.

During this period he first served in Missouri and Kansas,
marched to Oregon in 1849, remained there and in Washington
Territory until 1851, and after that was mainly on duty in
Texas. After his retirement he was engaged in farming in his
native county until 1861.

Upon the passage of the ordinance of secession he had ready a
company of cavalry, the Washington Mounted Rifles, with which
he joined Stuart in the Valley and took part in the First
Manassas campaign. At this time Gen. J. E. Johnston declared
that his company was the strongest in the First Virginia
cavalry regiment, "not surpassed in discipline and spirit by
any in the army," and recommended that Stuart be given brigade
command and that Jones, "skillful, brave and zealous in a very
high degree, " should succeed to the colonelcy, with Fitzhugh
Lee as lieutenant-colonel.

Consequently he became colonel of the First, upon the
organization of Stuart's brigade, and in the spring of 1862
was intrusted by Stuart with important duties in watching the
enemy from the Blue ridge to the Potomac. He was watchful and
vigorous and made the enemy feel his presence.

Soon afterward, being displaced by a regimental election, he
was assigned to the Seventh regiment, Robertson's brigade.
Rejoining Stuart in August he was distinguished in the Second
Manassas campaign, his regiment fighting splendidly at Brandy
Station, and winning commendation on several other occasions.

He participated in the raid around McClellan's army following
the battle of Sharpsburg, and on November 8th, having been
promoted brigadier-general, was assigned to command of
Robertson's, or the "Laurel brigade," largely composed of the
men who followed Ashby in the valley.

December 29th he was assigned to command of the Valley
district, including his brigade and all other troops operating
in that region, being selected for this post by Stonewall
Jackson. With the co-operation of General Imboden he made, in
April and May, 1863, a very successful raid upon the Baltimore
& Ohio railroad west of Cumberland, destroying an immense
amount of public and railroad property.

Then joining Stuart with his splendid brigade, he bore the
first shock, and both in morning and evening the brunt of
battle, in the famous cavalry fight of Brandy Station, June 9,
1863, his brigade ending the fight with more horses and more
and better smallarms than at the beginning, and capturing two
regimental colors, a battery of three pieces and about 250
prisoners.

During the advance of Lee into Pennsylvania, Jones, who had
been pronounced by Stuart "the best outpost officer" in the
cavalry, was depended upon mainly to cover the rear and flank
of the army. He defeated a Federal cavalry regiment at
Fairfield, Pa., and after the retreat of Lee was begun pushed
forward rapidly to protect the wagon trains of Ewell's
division.

Hurrying on with his staff on the night of July 4th, he found
Emack's Maryland company with one gun, holding at bay a
Federal division, with only half the train gone by. He joined
in the desperate fight in person and with his companions until
his command was scattered by a charge of cavalry. Separated
from his followers, he made his way alone to Williamsport and
organized all the men he could gather in the confusion for the
defense of the place before the arrival of Imboden.

Then, with half a dozen companies, he made his way through the
enemy's lines to his command, and returned with it to
participate in the attacks on Kilpatrick at Hagerstown and on
Buford at Williamsport. During the campaign, he reported, his
brigade fought in three battles and the affair at Boonsboro,
and captured over 600 prisoners.

Soon afterward an unfortunate break in his relations with
General Stuart, which had existed since the fall of 1861,
became so intensified as to have serious results. Col. O. R.
Funsten was given temporary command of the brigade, and on
October 9th General Jones was ordered to report for duty in
south west Virginia.

There he organized an excellent cavalry brigade, with which he
co-operated with Longstreet in east Tennessee, and in November
defeated the enemy near Rogersville. At Saltville, Va., in
May, 1864, with Gen. John H. Morgan, he foiled Averell's
designs against that post, defeated the Federals at
Wytheville, and pursued them to Dublin.

On May 23rd he was assigned to command of the department of
Southwest Virginia in the absence of General Breckinridge. It
was at that moment a position of great importance, as the
district was in a turmoil on account of the incursions of
Averell and Crook and Sigel, and Hunter was preparing to
advance on Lynchburg.

Early in June three strong columns of the enemy were marching
against him, and he made a stand with his own brigade,
Imboden's and Vaughn's before Hunter, at Piedmont. In the
desperate fight which followed, June 5th, he was killed and
his body fell into the hands of the enemy.

Source: Confederate Military History, vol. IV, p. 616
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,318
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#7
From what I recall, he took a wound at Manassas and joined the cavalry after. But that's my knowledge aside from that. He applied for a pension in 1900 and died in 1903.
From what I recall, he took a wound at Manassas and joined the cavalry after. But that's my knowledge aside from that. He applied for a pension in 1900 and died in 1903.

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series :

He was listed as:
* On rolls 1/31/1862 (place not stated) (On rolls through 04/63)
* Wounded 8/28/1862 Groveton, VA
* Wounded 7/9/1864 Monocacy, MD (Wounded in the left thigh)
* POW 7/10/1864 Frederick, MD
* Hospitalized 7/15/1864 West Building Hospital, Baltimore, MD
* Confined 7/30/1864 Fort McHenry, MD (Estimated day)
* Confined 8/15/1864 Point Lookout, MD (Estimated day)
* Exchanged 10/10/1864 (place not stated)
* Issued clothing 10/11/1864 (place not stated) (No further record)


Other Information:
born in 1841
died 9/23/1903 in Rockbridge County, VA
Buried: Mt. Zion Methodist Church Cem., Rockbridge, VA

(Resident, Glasgow, Rockbridge County, 1900.)

After the War he lived in Glasgow, VA
 

Hussar Yeomanry

Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Dec 6, 2017
Messages
930
Location
UK
#8
The 4th Virginia was of course in Jackson's First Brigade of the Army of the Shenandoah and was heavily engaged.

Here is the Official Report that Jackson wrote two days later:


Report of Brig. Gen. T. J. Jackson, C. S. Army, Commanding First Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah​

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, pp 481-482​

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE,​

Camp near Manassas, Va., July 23, 1861​


MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my brigade on the 21st.

About 4 in the morning I received notice from General Longstreet that he needed a re-enforcement of two regiments, which were accordingly ordered.

Subsequently I received an order from General Beauregard to move to the support of General Bonham, afterwards to support General Cocke, and finally to take such position as would enable me to re-enforce either, as circumstances might require.

Whilst in the position last indicated I received a request from General Cocke to guard the stone bridge, and immediately moved forward to effect the object in view.

Subsequently ascertaining that General Bee, who was on the left of our line, was hard pressed, I marched to his assistance, notifying him at the same time that I was advancing to his support; but, before arriving within cannon range of the enemy, I met General Bee’s forces falling back. I continued to advance with the understanding that he would form in my rear. His battery, under its dauntless commander, Captain Imboden, reversed and advanced with my brigade.

The first favorable position for meeting the enemy was at the next summit, where, at 11.30 a.m., I posted Captain Imboden’s battery and two pieces of Captain Stanard’s, so as to play upon the advancing foe. The Fourth Regiment, commanded by Col. James F. Preston, and the Twenty-seventh Regiment, commanded by Lieut. Col. John Echols, were posted in rear of the batteries; the Fifth Regiment, commanded by Col. Kenton Harper, was posted on the right of the batteries; the Second Regiment, commanded by Col. James W. Allen, on the left, and the Thirty-third, commanded by Col. A. C. Cummings, on his left. I also ordered forward the other two pieces of Captain Stanard’s and all those of Colonel Pendleton’s battery. They, as well as the battery under Lieutenant Pelham, came into action on the same line as the others; and nobly did the artillery maintain its position for hours against the enemy’s advancing thousands. Great praise is due to Colonel Pendleton and the other officers and men.

Apprehensive lest my flanks should be turned, I sent an order to Colonels Stuart and Radford, of the cavalry, to secure them. Colonel Stuart and that part of his command with him deserve great praise for the promptness with which they moved to my left and secured the flank by timely charging the enemy and driving him back.

General Bee, with his rallied troops, soon marched to my support and as re-enforcements continued to arrive General Beauregard posted them so as to strengthen the flanks of my brigade. The enemy not being able to force our lines by a direct fire of artillery, inclined part of his batteries to the right, so as to obtain an oblique fire; but in doing so exposed his pieces to a more destructive fire from our artillery, and one of his batteries was thrown so near to Colonel Cummings that it fell into his hands in consequence of his having made a gallant charge on it with his regiment; but owing to a destructive small-arm fire from the enemy he was forced to abandon it. At 3.30 p.m. the advance of the enemy having reached a position which called for the use of the bayonet, I gave the command for the charge of the more than brave Fourth and Twenty-seventh, and, under commanders worthy of such regiments, they, in the order in which they were posted, rushed forward obliquely to the left of our batteries, and through the blessing of God, who gave us the victory, pierced the enemy’s center, and by co-operating with the victorious Fifth and other forces soon placed the field essentially in our possession.

About the time that Colonel Preston passed our artillery the heroic Lieutenant-Colonel Lackland, of the Second Regiment, followed by the highly meritorious right of the Second, took possession of and endeavored to remove from the field the battery which Colonel Cummings had previously been forced to abandon; but after removing one of the pieces some distance was also forced by the enemy’s fire to abandon it.

The brigade, in connection with other troops, took seven field pieces in addition to the battery captured by Colonel Cummings. The enemy, though repulsed in the center, succeeded in turning our flanks. But their batteries having been disabled by our fire, and also abandoned by reason of the infantry charges, the victory was soon completed by the fire of small-arms and occasional shots from a part of our artillery, which I posted on the next crest in rear.

By direction of General Johnston I assumed the command of all the remaining artillery and infantry of the Army near the Lewis house, to act as circumstances might require. Part of this artillery fired on the retreating enemy. The colors of the First Michigan Regiment and an artillery flag were captured–the first by the Twenty-seventh Regiment and the other by the Fourth.

Lieut. Col. F. B. Jones, acting assistant adjutant-general; Lieut. T. G. Lee, aide-de-camp, and Lieut. A. S. Pendleton, brigade ordnance officer, and Capt. Thomas Marshall, volunteer aide, rendered valuable service. Cadets J. W. Thompson and N. W. Lee, also volunteer aides, merit special praise. Dr. Hunter H. McGuire has proved himself to be eminently qualified for his position–that of medical director of the brigade. Capt. Thomas L. Preston, though not of my command, rendered valuable service during the action.

It is with pain that I have to report as killed 11 officers, 14 non-commissioned officers, and 86 privates; wounded, 22 officers, 27 non-commissioned officers, and 319 privates; and missing, I officer and 4 privates.

I respectfully call attention to the accompanying reports of the commanders of the regiments and battery composing this brigade.(*)

Your most obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,

Brigadier-General, Provisional Army, Confederate States​
 

WJC

Brigadier General
Moderator
Thread Medic
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
11,107
#9
From the information presented, Mr. Barger certainly had a full and illustrious service. Gettysburg is very popular, but there was far more to the war than Gettysburg.
 

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
5,274
#11
The pension form is hard to read.
...And I do solemnly swear that I was a member of Co H 4th Va Infty _???_ Brigade & Co G 14th Va Cav CSA and that I am now disabled by reason of three wounds received in battle & infirmities of age & vertigo and that by reason of such disability I am now entitled to receive, under said Act, the sum of fifteen dollars annually....

2d What is the precise nature of the disability of the applicant?
Ans. The bone of the thigh of my left leg was cracked & ???? leg is weak. I suffer & fall sometimes from vertigo ^resulting from wound in the head^ & my strength is giving way.
3d Is it total. Ans. No
a. Is it partial? and if so, to what extent does it disable him from manual labor? Ans. It is partial and my ability to work is reduced ^more than^ one half.

Wounded 8/28/1862 Groveton, VA
Confusing Antietam for Manassas, etc.
@AlamoWade just want to be sure you have his record straight.

As ET posted above, he actually was wounded at Manassas. His first wound occurred when he was serving in the 4th Virginia Infantry. He enlisted April 1861 at age 21.

Appears on Company Muster Roll Co H 4th Virginia Infantry for April 30 to Oct 1862 dated Oct 31, 1862 as John J. Barger. Enlisted April 20, 1861. Remarks: Wounded in battle of Manassas Aug 28. Transferred to Preston's Cavalry by Order of Secty of War Sept 22 (or 28), 1862.

* Wounded 7/9/1864 Monocacy, MD (Wounded in the left thigh)
His second wound occurred when he was in the 14th Va Cav. and must be the wound he describes in his pension application as having cracked the bone in his left leg.

Records for Co G 14th Virginia Cavalry show:
April 17 - Nov 1, 1862 "absent with leave"
Oct 31, 1862 - Feb 28, 1863 "present"
Mar/Apr 1863 "present"
Apr 1, 1864 "present"
CMR June 30 - Oct 31, 1864 "absent"
1550109749451.png

CMR Nov/Dec 1864 "absent; paroled prisoner"

I find no mention of a third incident of wounding, as mentioned in his pension application, but am attaching his carded records from both regiments for you. There should be 11 pages in the 4th Virginia Infantry file and 15 pages in the 14th Virginia Infantry file.
 

Attachments




(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top