Mud Creek Line and the wounding of Lucius E. Polk


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Chattahooch33

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Today Brigadier General Lucius E. Polk, nephew of the General Polk killed 3 days ago, was severely wounded in an artillery bombardment along Mud Creek.
The Confederates held a strong line from Brushy Mountain that ran south through the Latimer Farm and then along a bluff overlooking Mud Creek to near where it crosses Dallas Hwy. Federal batteries from New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania were able to maneuver to a close range and blasted away at Cleburne's Division inflicting heavy losses.

Today was another day of the Kennesaw Campaign and the constant close quarter fighting that lasted the entire month of June leading up to the actual battle of Kennesaw.

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Lucius E. Polk was one of Cleburne's greatest brigade commanders. He also knew Cleburne well for he was also from Helena, AR and enlisted in the Yell Rifles of the 1st Arkansas with Cleburne in 1861. After Cleburne was promoted to brigadier general Lucius Polk took command of the 1st Arkansas Infantry (renamed the 15th Arkansas) and later took command of the brigade when Cleburne was promoted to major general.

Here is an excerpt from Sam Watkins' account of Lucius E. Polk's wounding, in Co. Aytch:

"While in this position, a bomb, loaded with shrapnel and grapeshot, came ripping and tearing through our ranks, wounding General Lucius E. Polk, and killing some of his staff.

"Well, this evening of which I now write, the litter corps ran up and placed him on a litter, and were bringing him back through Company H, of our regiment, when one of the men was wounded, and I am not sure but another one was killed, and they let him fall to the ground. At that time, the Yankees seemed to know that they had killed or wounded a general, and tore loose their batteries upon this point. The dirt and rocks were flying in every direction, when Captain Joe P. Lee, Jim Brandon and myself, ran forward, grabbed up the litter, brought General Polk off the crest of the hill, and assisted in carrying him to the headquarters of General Cleburne. When we got to General Cleburne, he came forward and asked General Polk if he was bady wounded, and General Polk remarked, laughingly: "Well, I think I will be able to get a furlough now." This is a fact. General Polk's leg had been shot almost entirely off. I remember the foot part being twisted clear around, and lying by his side, while the blood was running through the litter in a perfect stream. I remember, also, that General Cleburne dashed a tear from his eye with his hand, and saying, 'Poor fellow,' at once galloped to the front, and ordered an immediate advance of our lines. Cleburne's division was soon engaged. Night coming on, prevented a general engagement, but we drove the Yankee line two miles."
 
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Chattahooch33

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I have a bit of a problem with Watkin's account. Polk was in Cleburne's division and Watkins was in Cheatham's.
I would have to assume here he 'heard what happened' and wrote it as he was actually there. I doubt he was.
 
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The same goes with his account of Leo Polk's death. Bate's brigade was there, not Maney's.
That afternoon--the 14th--Wright's Brigade commanded by J. C. Carter actually moved into Bate's trenches as his men were relieved and stayed there till the 16th. So it is possible, the whole division moved to relieve Bate that afternoon?
 

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