Most Unusual Civil War Monument?

Cavalry Charger

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This gets my vote as being the most unusual monument, I say unusual, what I really mean is...hideous.
View attachment 302180
They could have at least matched the colour of the General and the horse!

I don't know where this one is located, but pulling it down surely would not be an offense to anyone :eek:
 

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Cavalry Charger

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Sadly not, though I'd imagine those who do respect Forrest would actually like this statue.
Thank you for joining us, and I honestly thought this statue was created as an 'offence' to Forrest! It is so hideous.

Now I know more of the background after reading your attached article and I see it sits on private property. Where once it was hidden by vegetation, which the Council decided to clear to make it visible and now refuse to return the vegetation to make it 'invisible' :confused: :unsure: ...

An unusual statue/monument can still be a thing to be admired, even if it requires some explanation. This one's finally got an explanation and if I wasn't a fan before, I'm definitely not a fan now!
 

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I mean, it's the perfect statue if you're trying to poke fun at him, which wasn't the intent.
Which is exactly what I thought it was! From the moment I saw it I thought it was a caricature of the man meant to insult. After reading the article I'm sure that wasn't the intent. It is a great oddity in that sense to be sure.
 

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This headstone at Fredericksburg National Cemetery is the most unusual that I know, and a challenge for park management to figure out what to do about it.
Another great reflective article and no doubt a dilemma for those involved. The obvious pronunciation is 'fooks', and the misspelling of that unfortunate. Definitely an unusual headstone/marker which creates an added interest if nothing else. I'm sure Charles himself is long past caring either way.
 

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Is it just me, or with all our vaunted technological progress, have we lost the ability to cast good bronze statues? It seems to me that the most beautiful and moving of these scupltures are the ones made about a hundred years ago as opposed to the more recent ones.
It is not so much the of fault of the process, perhaps, as it is the vision of the artist.
 

James N.

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Although not as remarkable as the Forrest statue, my candidate would be the Putnam Stump at Shiloh:

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"In postwar years during the creation of Shiloh National Military Park when veterans of the 14th Wisconsin revisited the battlefield to select a spot for their unit's monument they discovered the stump of a tree beneath which member John D. Putnam had been buried by his comrades following the battle. Although his remains had been removed to the National Cemetery where they now lie and the tree had been cut down, the stump bearing Putnam's name carved into it remained an uncontestable witness that this had indeed been where they had fought and thus this replica in stone now marks the spot."
 

Cavalry Charger

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Although not as remarkable as the Forrest statue, my candidate would be the Putnam Stump at Shiloh:

View attachment 302308View attachment 302309

"In postwar years during the creation of Shiloh National Military Park when veterans of the 14th Wisconsin revisited the battlefield to select a spot for their unit's monument they discovered the stump of a tree beneath which member John D. Putnam had been buried by his comrades following the battle. Although his remains had been removed to the National Cemetery where they now lie and the tree had been cut down, the stump bearing Putnam's name carved into it remained an uncontestable witness that this had indeed been where they had fought and thus this replica in stone now marks the spot."
One of our Mississippi friends, maybe @Ole Miss , shared about this monument in a thread more recently. It is a very interesting story.
 

Sbc

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Although not as remarkable as the Forrest statue, my candidate would be the Putnam Stump at Shiloh:

View attachment 302308View attachment 302309

"In postwar years during the creation of Shiloh National Military Park when veterans of the 14th Wisconsin revisited the battlefield to select a spot for their unit's monument they discovered the stump of a tree beneath which member John D. Putnam had been buried by his comrades following the battle. Although his remains had been removed to the National Cemetery where they now lie and the tree had been cut down, the stump bearing Putnam's name carved into it remained an uncontestable witness that this had indeed been where they had fought and thus this replica in stone now marks the spot."
I always found this hard to believe that a stump existed for almost 40 years and the name was legible.
 


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