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Most and least effective generals at Gettysburg

Discussion in 'Battle of Gettysburg' started by Elennsar, Apr 21, 2010.

  1. Lefty

    Lefty Corporal

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    Jenkins was concussed by a Union shell fired from Cemetery Hill while Jenkins was on Barlow/Blocher's knoll doing a recon early on July 2.
    He was knocked unconscious and taken back to the Major's house on the old Harrisburg Road. Jenkin's has a statue/bust outside of Harrisburg at the Rupp house in Oyster Point. Jenkins and Unionist John Robinson share the distinction of being the hairiest generals in their respective armies. Beards so long that they had to tuck them into their belts in order to sit down and eat supper.
     

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  3. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    Well, so he was genuinely wounded then. But what was he doing hiding in the woods?
     
  4. prroh

    prroh Captain Honored Fallen Comrade

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    Even non serious head wounds bleed a lot and look much worse than it is. I have never read that he was knocked unconscious. Anyway Jenkins did virtually nothing about relieving two infantry brigades who were Ewell's left flank guards. By not getting into position , as ordered, Jenkins actually caused harm to the cause.
     
  5. Lefty

    Lefty Corporal

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    Prroh,
    The secondary source regarding Jenkins being knocked "unconscious" can be found in GB Mag # 3 in the article pertaining to Jenkins' wounding by LBG Paul Shevchuk.
    The primary source can be found in the SHSP, Vol. 24, p. 344. Bouldin to Daniels.
     
  6. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    Were those two infantry brigades eventually relieved by part of Stuart's command?
     
  7. prroh

    prroh Captain Honored Fallen Comrade

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    Not when they were needed for the July 2nd assault
     
  8. Lefty

    Lefty Corporal

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    K Hale,
    Basically what happens is that the two infantry brigades (Smith's Virginians and Gordon's Georgians) were out on the York Pike about three miles from where Jenkins got popped in his noggin while in the act of receiving orders. Gordon is recalled late in the afternoon to provide support for the Hays/Avery assault if needed. Gordon was needed but was never utilized. Smith (only about 800 rifles) stayed put out along the York Pike and the Granite Hill railroad station, which was the first stop east of town. Smith also deployed a very thin skirmish line southwest towards the Hanover Road.

    Smith's skirmish line ended about a mile short of the Hanover Road and perhaps a 1/2 mile short of Brinkerhoff's Ridge which runs perpendicular to the Hanover Road. Sometime around 6 PM some of Gregg's troopers show up on the Hanover Road on Johnson's divisions extreme left. Johnson deploys the Stonewall brigade into the gap near Brinkerhoff's Ridge. The 2nd VA becomes engaged with McIntosh's troopers which causes Johnson to leave the Stonewall brigade positioned east of Culp Hill that evening, thereby denying the Confederates the use of Walkers men during the early evening assualt on Culps Hill on 2 July.

    Had Jenkins been in position on the York Pike as he was seemingly ordered it would have freed up at least two, and perhaps three CSA brigades for use on 2 July. Stuart had actually been personally present along with Ewell's step-son Cambell Brown, sans Stuart's brigades, on Brinkerhoff's Ridge, around the time McIntosh's trooper initially showed up. It was then that he noticed the suitable terrain for cavalry actions east of town and, in particular, in the environs surrounding Cress' Ridge.
     
  9. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    Thank you, Lefty. Was this well into the evening or was it still light?
     
  10. Lefty

    Lefty Corporal

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    K Hale,

    It was still light, a few hours before dusk. The clash on B-hoff Ridge ended, however, just past dusk.
    If you stand on B-Hoff ridge today (on Hoffman, as opposed to Hanover Road) you can see East Cav field and the Michigan Brigade monument quite clearly. Being that the area was signifigantly less wooded in 1863, it's probably safe to assume that JEB could see even further. Unfortuneately, the stone wall bordering Hoffman Road which was the point of contention between the 2nd VA and McIntosh's crew was removed last year by the landowner.
     
  11. IrishBrigade

    IrishBrigade Private

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    The worst has several contenders, most of which on the Confederate side, I'd have to side with Stuart closely followed by Heth for causing this in the first place. Stuart's negligance of leaving the ANV without it's eyes and ears was unforgivable and for me was the forebearer of all the mistakes that would follow.

    The best I'd go for Meade, he was exactly what was required, a steady pair of hands, his conservation of energy and ammo on the last day as well as his decision not to attack Lee's position was most admirable, I often think Meade is one of the forgotten men of Gettysburg despite the fact he was in command.
     
  12. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    I'll have to ask you where you gained this impression and hope you tell me something other than The Killer Angels. Please read Stuart's orders, then tell me how he was "negligent" in carrying them out. Most people who say things like this have never read his orders and are influenced by fictional accounts and post-war finger-pointing. A slight effort at research will correct this misimpression.

    Here are the orders.

    Longstreet's orders.

    Some more helpful reading:

    Mosby paper
    Plenty of Blame to Go Around

    HTH.
     
  13. Copper 83rd PA INF

    Copper 83rd PA INF Sergeant

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    I don't know how I missed this before K.

    See? I always knew you were one of my favorite people here!

    I couldn't agree more. And don't forget about Gouverneur K. Warren.
     
  14. Fred R

    Fred R Cadet

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    Being new here I'm taken back by the number of replies to the questions posed. I think it's great but I'm at a loss to even think I could add anything. So I think I'll just jump in here and cast my vote for most effective to Gen. Greene; least effective to Gen. Stuart. I'll also add I think Gen. John Geary deserves honorable mention in the least effective column for getting lost at a critical time.
     
  15. Elennsar

    Elennsar Colonel

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    Who?

    Oh, right. The engineer. :laugh1:

    Sorry, couldn't resist. Warren did splendidly at Gettysburg.

    His best day of the war, in my opinion.
     
  16. DWMack

    DWMack Cadet

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    most effective for the US: Meade, Hancock, RE Lee

    Even though not a General YET, I also give honorable mention to J. Chamberlain.
     
  17. Elennsar

    Elennsar Colonel

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    Chamberlain ought to count for something, even if his feats were exageratted.

    He still did a good job with a largely inexperienced (in battle) regiment.
     
  18. Brenal

    Brenal First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Least effective for the CSA , Alfred Iverson

    Least effective for the Union, Alexander Schimmelfennig
     
  19. Elennsar

    Elennsar Colonel

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    Something in particular about Schimmelfenning?

    Not saying you're wrong, but better him than Sickles, in my opinion. Or Barlow.

    Iverson...well, let's just say he's on my list of generals whose afterlife should be filled by hearing the cries of the widows and orphans, so no argument there.
     
  20. Brenal

    Brenal First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Schimmelfennig simply because being holed up in a back garden woodpile for most of the battle is not the most effective way of being a General Officer
     
  21. Elennsar

    Elennsar Colonel

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    True, but unlike Iverson (to use your other nomination) he didn't get the better part of his command slaughtered.

    Can't have helped morale for him to be inexplicably missing, though.
     

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