More Sacred Land on the Verge of Destruction

Irishtom29

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Location
Kent, Washington
Yes, its a sad truth. It is sad that history is disposable--and it is sad that too many can't understand that they probably will have to reinvent some important wheels.

History endures long after the places it happened are gone or changed beyond recognition. If we needed the places to know the history, well we all know the history of places we've never been.

For many here history is a hobby, a form of entertainment or maybe a living. It's not reasonable to expect other people to indulge our enthusiasms. If they do fine, if not, no sweat.
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
If we needed the places to know the history
Of course we don't need places. But for the great majority, it's the physical relics that make clear the fact that there is a history--that something happened. Hopefully that will raise the question: Why did it happen? Once that question has been raised, a lot of additional questions follow and some conclusions. For example, I see a battlefield. Why was there a battle? Then, Well I surely don't want to go through something like that--how might it have been avoided?
It's not reasonable to expect other people to indulge our enthusiasms.
This kind of history is a learning tool. It is not necessary that other people be enthusiastic--just knowledgeable.
 
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