More Civil War participants at a younger age

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Another overlighted West Point absolvent of June 1861, David H. Buel (1839-1870). Initially a cavalry officer, he switched to ordnance and eventually served as Chief of Ordnance of the Army of Tennessee, briefly being a POW at Atlanta. The Captain continued his service after the war and was assassinated by a deserter.

Picture from my pinterest.
 

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George A. Smith (1824-1864). A candy maker in civil life; he served in the 1st Georgia Infantry Battalion and then in the 36th Georgia Infantry Regiment, also known as 1st Confederate Infantry, eventually becoming its commander. For some time he led a brigade on the gulf. At Kennesaw Mountain the Colonel was arrested for granting a temporary truce but later was back with his regiment; eventually being killed at Franklin.

Picture from his findagrave entry.
 

Jimklag

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George A. Smith (1824-1864). A candy maker in civil life; he served in the 1st Georgia Infantry Battalion and then in the 36th Georgia Infantry Regiment, also known as 1st Confederate Infantry, eventually becoming its commander. For some time he led a brigade on the gulf. At Kennesaw Mountain the Colonel was arrested for granting a temporary truce but later was back with his regiment; eventually being killed at Franklin.

Picture from his findagrave entry.
Colonel Smith at a much younger age. Can't be more than 10-12 years old in that photo.
 
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And a special entry only slightly younger, John Wainwright (1839-1915), here between October 1861 and January 1862 as the volunteer received a commission in the later month. He served in the 97th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment and would become its Colonel when the war ended. He also received the Medal of Honor for the 2nd Battle of Fort Fisher; and was the father of Rear Admiral John D. Wainwright.

Picture from his findagrave entry.
 

James N.

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John T. Hambrick (1823-1872), here as Private (eventually rising to Sergeant) in the North Carolina Volunteers during the Mexican-American War. The merchant would join the Confederacy and serve as Major of the 13rd North Carolina State Troops (3rd Infantry) before resigning for health reasons in late 1862. However in the next year he´d become Colonel of the 2nd North Carolina Home Guards.

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Hambrick is carrying an unusual non-regulation and likely imported saber.
 
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William Galt (ca. 1841-1864), here shortly before, or early in, the war. He was a member of the VMIs class of 1864 but (with a few months exception) left the institute to serve as Adjutant of the 52nd Virginia Infantry Regiment. The Lieutenant was wounded several times and didn´t recover from his final one at Third Winchester.

Picture from the VMI archives.
 
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John W. Barlow (1838-1914) graduated from West Point in May 1861 and became an artillerist. However in the next year he switched to engineering and did that both in the east and west. The Captain continued his service after the war, eventually becoming a Brigadier General and Chief of Engineers a day before retirement in 1901.

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Washington F. Sydnor (1838-1887) graduated from the VMI in 1860 and led a company of the 41st Virginia Infantry Regiment. The Captain was wounded during the Chancellorsville Campaign and hospitalized until sometime in 1864 when he left the unit. He reenlisted in a battery or horse artillery and apparently joined the Invalid Corps in some capacity shortly before the war ended. Afterwards he worked in a multitude of businesses, including as police chief and prison warden.

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James M. Lancaster (1849-1900) graduated from West Point in 1862 and served half of the war as artillerist in the east and half back at the academy. Afterwars he continued his artillery service, commanding a battalion during the Spanish-American War. However the Major contracted some illness and died two years later.

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John R. Meigs (1842-1864), the son of Quartermaster-General Montgomery Meigs, graduated as first in his West Point class in 1863. However he had managed to get a furlough and volunteered at 1st Manassas, returning to the academy afterwards (although being court-martialled for a fight). He became an engineer on various staffs in the east. The Lieutenant was killed in an encounter with Confederate scouts, and would later be buried in the new Arlington Cemetery that his father established.

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John R. Meigs (1842-1864), the son of Quartermaster-General Montgomery Meigs, graduated as first in his West Point class in 1863. However he had managed to get a furlough and volunteered at 1st Manassas, returning to the academy afterwards (although being court-martialled for a fight). He became an engineer on various staffs in the east. The Lieutenant was killed in an encounter with Confederate scouts, and would later be buried in the new Arlington Cemetery that his father established.

Picture from my pinterest.
Meigs was killed in a controversial dustup with some of Mosby's men that was portrayed by them as a legitimate skirmish and by Union press as assassination or outright murder.
 
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Seth L. Phelps (1824-1885), here as Passed Midshipman said to be around 1841 (though he kept the rank for another 14 years). During the civil war the Lieutenant Commander led several ships in the Mississippi River Squadron and served as flag captain. Being passed over for a squadron command several times, he resigned in 1864. Later he would become U.S. Minister to Peru and eventually died there from a fever.

Picture from my pinterest.
 
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And a special entry only slightly younger, John Wainwright (1839-1915), here between October 1861 and January 1862 as the volunteer received a commission in the later month. He served in the 97th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment and would become its Colonel when the war ended. He also received the Medal of Honor for the 2nd Battle of Fort Fisher; and was the father of Rear Admiral John D. Wainwright.

Picture from his findagrave entry.
Another one of him.
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Source:
 
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And another Midshipman, though not passed yet, John G. Walker (1835-1907) in 1853. During the civil war the Lieutenant Commander served in the west and commanded a number of gunboats and batteries along the great rivers and later on the Carolinas as well. Afterwards he continued his naval service and eventually became a Rear Admiral in 1894.

Picture from the U.S. Naval Institute.
 
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James B. Barry (1821-1906), here in 1853. A Texas Ranger and Indian fighter; during the civil war he served in the 1st (McCulloch`s) Texas Cavalry and later in the 46th Texas Cavalry Regiment. The Lieutenant Colonel also was involved in aggriculture and local politics.

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George Marsh (c.1833-1862). The Connecticut native financially supported his parents as carpenter and polisher. During the war he served as Corporal, and later Sergeant, in the 8th Connecticut Infantry Regiment; while still supporting his parents (now also by tattooing his comrades). He was killed at Antietam, the first loss of his regiment on that day, being struck by an artillery shot.

Pictures and more about him in this blog.
 



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