Monuments Remembering Soldiers of Both Sides

Gettysburg Guide #154

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Dec 30, 2019
This will be similar to a previous post of mine in a string where someone asked about the big monument on Little Round Top (i.e. the 44th and 12th NY). However, given all the discussion of late about monuments, it seemed a good idea to again note some at Gettysburg that recognize soldiers on both sides and to add some photos.

Although officially named the Gregg Cavalry Shaft in honor of Union General David McM. Gregg, this monument on the East Cavalry Field is the first one at Gettysburg to recognize both Union and Confederate soldiers. It states that it marks the engagement between Union cavalry under Union Brig. Gen. David McM. Gregg and Confederate cavalry under Confederate Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart. It designates all the units, both north and south, who fought in the engagements there on the afternoon of July 3, 1863. Notice in the photo of the base that all the units who fought at the East Cavalry Field are listed, not just Gregg’s command. It was dedicated October 15, 1884.
Cavalry Shaft Full.jpeg
Cavalry Shaft Base.jpeg



The next monument to recognize men from both armies is the High Water Mark of the Rebellion Monument. The design for the monument was suggested by John Bachelder, whose name you will know as one of the earliest and very important historians of the battle. It is an open bronze book with the identity of all units who participated in the attack that we have come to call “Pickett’s Charge”, as well as all those who were part of the repulse. It sits at the famous “Copse of Trees” and was dedicated June 2, 1892.
High Water Mark.jpeg



Another monument that can be reasonably thought of as remembering men from both sides is the Eternal Light Peace Memorial on Oak Hill. The idea for a peace memorial originated with the veterans during the 1913 reunion at Gettysburg. However, it was not dedicated until 25 years later, on July 3, 1938, the 75th anniversary of the battle. The tall column at the center of the monument is made of Alabama Limestone, while the wide base of the monument is made from Maine Granite. The symbolism is rather obvious. Just as we had veterans attending the 75th anniversary of D-Day last year, there were about 2,000 Civil War veterans in the crowd of about a quarter million listening to the dedication speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. During the festivities, many of the children in the crowd were introduced to, and encouraged to shake hands with, some of the veterans. Some of those children, although aging now, are almost certainly still alive. This means that we are only one handshake away from the generation of the Civil War. This is a good time in our history to aspire to the statement on the from of the monument: “Peace Eternal in a Nation United”.

Peace Light.jpeg

The next monument honoring men from both sides is the Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial located in the National Cemetery Annex. It is a bronze sculpture by Ron Tunison depicting Union Captain Henry Bingham giving succor to mortally wounded Confederate Brig. Gen. Lewis Armistead. Upon learning that Bingham was a Mason, Armistead, who was also a Mason, asked that Bingham see to it that certain personal effects were returned to the Armistead family. (As a side note, Bingham’s letter to Bachelor describing this incident does not mention the oft referred to bible.) The monument was dedicated in 1993. It is located in the annex to the National Cemetery.

Brother to Brother full.jpeg
Brother to Brother wo base.jpeg


The last monument honoring men from both sides is one that I am ashamed to say I missed in my earlier post. It is the Maryland State Monument. One could not imagine a monument more appropriate for Maryland, which was deeply divided during the Civil War. The sculpture by Lawrence M. Ludtke is titled “Brothers Again”. It shows two soldiers, and one Union and one Confederate, helping to support each other, as both appear somewhat injured. During the fighting on Culp’s Hill on July 3, 1863, there is evidence that Marylander fought directly against Marylander. This monument is located near the parking lot for the National Cemetery and was dedicated in 1994.

Maryland Full.jpeg
Brothers Again.jpeg
 

Gettysburg Guide #154

Sergeant
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Dec 30, 2019
I thought about including the 66th NY, but some think that the Confederate soldier seems subservient to the Union soldier. As you can see, the Union man is providing the water, and the Confederate is wounded and unarmed, while the Union man is healthy and armed. So yes, it's peace and unity, but on Union terms. Of course, Union terms are okay for me, but I thought it might be objectionable to our Southern friends.
 

lelliott19

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This one's a monument for the 23rd New Jersey at Salem Church. It's not at Gettysburg, but I've always liked the exchange of letters between Hilary A Herbert (former Col of the 8th AL, Wilcox's brigade; later US Secretary of the Navy) and Edward Burd Grub, Jr. (Col. 23rd NJ) about the 23rd New Jersey monument, dedicated in 1907. I posted their letters a few years ago here - transcribed from the originals at the Alabama Department of Archives and History.
1597623974223.png
 
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Tom Elmore

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Jan 16, 2015
Mentioning Confederates at all may have generated some controversy. In reading articles from the National Tribune of the 1890's, which was geared toward Union veterans, I am struck by the vehement opposition some readers expressed to allowing any Confederate group to erect a monument on the battlefield (such as the Confederate Maryland Battalion's monument on Culp's Hill), although I also well recollect an insightful counterpoint argument that it was difficult to establish one's valor and heroic deeds on a battlefield when no reference to an opponent was made.

Same goes for a display of the Confederate banner - this item appeared in the National Tribune of October 11, 1888, which illustrates the depth of feeling among some, if not most, Union veterans a quarter century after the war: "The parade of the rebel flag at the head of the procession was exceedingly offensive ... The public display of the flag of the rebellion - the standard of treason and bloody domestic warfare - is a crime, and should be treated as such. That it has not been legally declared such and prohibited under severe penalties has been a grave mistake. No occasion can justify its being flaunted in the face of the people to taunt loyal men."
 

connecticut yankee

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
This will be similar to a previous post of mine in a string where someone asked about the big monument on Little Round Top (i.e. the 44th and 12th NY). However, given all the discussion of late about monuments, it seemed a good idea to again note some at Gettysburg that recognize soldiers on both sides and to add some photos.

Although officially named the Gregg Cavalry Shaft in honor of Union General David McM. Gregg, this monument on the East Cavalry Field is the first one at Gettysburg to recognize both Union and Confederate soldiers. It states that it marks the engagement between Union cavalry under Union Brig. Gen. David McM. Gregg and Confederate cavalry under Confederate Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart. It designates all the units, both north and south, who fought in the engagements there on the afternoon of July 3, 1863. Notice in the photo of the base that all the units who fought at the East Cavalry Field are listed, not just Gregg’s command. It was dedicated October 15, 1884.
View attachment 370257View attachment 370258


The next monument to recognize men from both armies is the High Water Mark of the Rebellion Monument. The design for the monument was suggested by John Bachelder, whose name you will know as one of the earliest and very important historians of the battle. It is an open bronze book with the identity of all units who participated in the attack that we have come to call “Pickett’s Charge”, as well as all those who were part of the repulse. It sits at the famous “Copse of Trees” and was dedicated June 2, 1892.
View attachment 370259


Another monument that can be reasonably thought of as remembering men from both sides is the Eternal Light Peace Memorial on Oak Hill. The idea for a peace memorial originated with the veterans during the 1913 reunion at Gettysburg. However, it was not dedicated until 25 years later, on July 3, 1938, the 75th anniversary of the battle. The tall column at the center of the monument is made of Alabama Limestone, while the wide base of the monument is made from Maine Granite. The symbolism is rather obvious. Just as we had veterans attending the 75th anniversary of D-Day last year, there were about 2,000 Civil War veterans in the crowd of about a quarter million listening to the dedication speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. During the festivities, many of the children in the crowd were introduced to, and encouraged to shake hands with, some of the veterans. Some of those children, although aging now, are almost certainly still alive. This means that we are only one handshake away from the generation of the Civil War. This is a good time in our history to aspire to the statement on the from of the monument: “Peace Eternal in a Nation United”.

View attachment 370260
The next monument honoring men from both sides is the Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial located in the National Cemetery Annex. It is a bronze sculpture by Ron Tunison depicting Union Captain Henry Bingham giving succor to mortally wounded Confederate Brig. Gen. Lewis Armistead. Upon learning that Bingham was a Mason, Armistead, who was also a Mason, asked that Bingham see to it that certain personal effects were returned to the Armistead family. (As a side note, Bingham’s letter to Bachelor describing this incident does not mention the oft referred to bible.) The monument was dedicated in 1993. It is located in the annex to the National Cemetery.

View attachment 370261View attachment 370262

The last monument honoring men from both sides is one that I am ashamed to say I missed in my earlier post. It is the Maryland State Monument. One could not imagine a monument more appropriate for Maryland, which was deeply divided during the Civil War. The sculpture by Lawrence M. Ludtke is titled “Brothers Again”. It shows two soldiers, and one Union and one Confederate, helping to support each other, as both appear somewhat injured. During the fighting on Culp’s Hill on July 3, 1863, there is evidence that Marylander fought directly against Marylander. This monument is located near the parking lot for the National Cemetery and was dedicated in 1994.

View attachment 370276View attachment 370277
Thank you for the excellent photos. I always enjoy stopping at and viewing the Maryland monument at Gettysburg. It is in such a peaceful and serene spot now that the old Cyclorama/Visitor's Center and the traffic it generated is gone. The monument in it simplicity is striking. The deep message it imparts regarding love and care for your enemy is thought provoking to say the least.
 
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mo
I thought about including the 66th NY, but some think that the Confederate soldier seems subservient to the Union soldier. As you can see, the Union man is providing the water, and the Confederate is wounded and unarmed, while the Union man is healthy and armed. So yes, it's peace and unity, but on Union terms. Of course, Union terms are okay for me, but I thought it might be objectionable to our Southern friends.
Wouldn't think so, but since people find the representation of Lincoln emancipating slaves objectionable, anything seems possible as far as being objectionial.........
 

Stiles/Akin

Sergeant Major
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Location
Atlanta, Georgia
Here is the Kentucky Monument as this state had men serving on both sides during this battle
Regards
David
View attachment 370304
The Missouri State Monument as this state had regiments on both sides as well
View attachment 370305
I recognize this as a Sewah Studios monument. I am going to inquire about making another listing Cassville formerly unknown soldiers and info about area hospitals
 

kholland

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Feb 13, 2011
Location
Howard County, Maryland
This one's a monument for the 23rd New Jersey at Salem Church. It's not at Gettysburg, but I've always liked the exchange of letters between Hilary A Herbert (former Col of the 8th AL, Wilcox's brigade; later US Secretary of the Navy) and Edward Burd Grub, Jr. (Col. 23rd NJ) about the 23rd New Jersey monument, dedicated in 1907. I posted their letters a few years ago here - transcribed from the originals at the Alabama Department of Archives and History.
View attachment 370306
This is the one I think I remembered but you beat me to it. :happy: I think this is the one that has the Union unit's opposition unit's plaque on the reverse side. Quite a show of brotherhood.
 

Seduzal

Major
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Jun 19, 2013
Location
Canton, North Carolina
Thanks for sharing this awesome article and photos. I wonder how many more monuments are out there in other Cemetery’s’ that have not been found yet!
 

Rick Richter

Corporal
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Thank you for the excellent photos. I always enjoy stopping at and viewing the Maryland monument at Gettysburg. It is in such a peaceful and serene spot now that the old Cyclorama/Visitor's Center and the traffic it generated is gone. The monument in it simplicity is striking. The deep message it imparts regarding love and care for your enemy is thought provoking to say the least.

Yes, this is one of my favorite monuments!
 

Buckeye Bill

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Jul 29, 2013
* National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Punchbowl Crater) in Honolulu, Hawai'i.

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