Men of the Missouri Brigade

AUG

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#41
Does anyone know the final disposition of a Captain Thomas B. Wilson, Co. G, 2nd MO infantry.

He was excoriated by both Cockrell and Pemberton in their official reports regarding his behavior at Champion Hill and Big Black.

He allegedly allowed himself to be captured at Big Black and told Col. Gates, 1st MO (who had been captured as well) that he, Wilson, intended to take the oath of allegiance and then fight the Yankees as a guerrilla.

I was wondering if anyone on Fold 3 has ever checked his muster rolls to see what his disposition was in regards to the Confederacy.

If anyone knows or finds out, could they post it or PM me?

Thanks.
Here's his service card: http://www.sos.mo.gov/Images/Archives/Military/s00904/s00904_1215.pdf


Ephraim M. Anderson, who served in Wilson's Co. G, mentions him a few times in his memoir: https://books.google.com/books?id=_H8vAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q=wilson&f=false

On p. 372 he says:
"Though Wilson, the captain of our company, was still in prison at the North [September 1863], General Cockrell appointed Lieutenant Alford to its command. Wilson's conduct at Black river had been censured by Cockrell, and he was disposed to advance Alford, whom he greatly admired. This circumstance, however, injured the character of Wilson but little with the men, who retained for him a strong personal regard and esteem, while, at the same time, they looked upon Alford as altogether equal to the position he now occupied."
 

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AUG

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#42
Here's an image of Colonel Amos Camden Riley, 1st-4th Missouri Infantry.

Colonel Amos Camden Riley 2.jpg

http://collections.mohistory.org/resource/156740

Description on the image: "Col A. C. Riley First Mo. Confd. Infty Killed May 30, 64. New Hope Ga" (written below image). "A. C. Riley Col First Mo Infty C. S. A. Killed May 30/64. at New Hope Church Georgia. While speaking to me about the battle. Jos. Boyce. Capt. Co D 1st Mo. Confed. Infty." (written on reverse side of image). "MAY 24 1915 JOS. BOYCE" (stamped on reverse side). Riley had the photo taken in fall of 1863 following their 'exchange' after Vicksburg; he had it sent to his family through Capt. Joseph Boyce.

Amos Camden Riley was originally born near Louisville, Kentucky, January 22, 1837, but in 1844 at the age of seven he moved to New Madrid, Missouri, with his family. At 14 he entered the Kentucky Military Institute, graduating in 1855, however he would take up farming near Island No. 10 in New Madrid County thereafter. Riley would help organized what would become Company I of the 1st Missouri Infantry (the regiment recruited and organized by John Bowen in Memphis, Tn., in summer of 1861) and was elected first lieutenant. Obviously a very able officer and popular with the men, Riley then rose through the ranks quite rapidly. He was elected captain of the company October 21, 1861, after the former commander resigned. On April 3, 1862, Riley was elected lieutenant colonel following Bowen's promotion to brigadier general; he assumed command of the regiment after Colonel Lucius L. Rich was mortally wounded at Shiloh. Riley was then promoted to colonel in August 1862. He continued to command the 1st Missouri (later consolidated with the 4th Missouri Infantry in November 1862) throughout the rest of his service, until he was shot and killed by a sharpshooter along the front line at New Hope Church during the Atlanta Campaign.

In describing sharp fighting between the picket lines while at New Hope Church, Capt. Joseph Boyce of Co. D, 1st-4th Missouri, writes in his reminiscences that, "It was here we lost our colonel, A. C. Riley, who was killed by a sharpshooter while he was talking to the writer. Other accounts of Col. Riley's death state [he] was killed by a fragment of a shell. Such was not the case. It was a severe blow to the regiment. He was an excellent officer, a thorough soldier and as gentle as a child; brave, watchful and always with his men."

Brig. Gen. Francis M. Cockrell reported to division commander Maj. Gen. Samuel G. French that, "I am grieved to inform you that about 10 minutes before 2 o' clock p.m. today, Col. A. C. Riley, comdg 1st/4th Mo. Infty, one of the most gallant, skillful & meritorious officers of our army was pierced almost through the heart by a minnie ball and died in a few moments. My loss is almost irreparable."

After the war, Riley's father along "with his trusty Servt during all the war," Jeff Patterson, Riley's former body servant, traveled to recover his remains in Atlanta and have him reinterred in the family cemetery near New Madrid, Mo.

Reference: Captain Joseph Boyce and the 1st Missouri Infantry, C.S.A. ed. by William C. Winter.

Here's his memorial on Find A Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=117773022

Riley's letters and several of his battle reports were published in the Missouri Historical Review 85; they can be read online here:
http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/mhr/id/45196/rec/3
http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/mhr/id/45329


Also, if you search his name you'll find what must be a descendant who bore his name, 1st Lt. Amos Camden Riley Bock, also from New Madrid, was a West Point graduate and assigned to the 101st Airborne when he lost his life in Baghdad in 2006. May both brave officers rest in peace.
 

archieclement

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#43
Great post, but was curious the Duvall brothers appear to be wearing guerrilla style shirts, were they also popular with Mo troops in the regular CSA?
 

AUG

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#44
Great post, but was curious the Duvall brothers appear to be wearing guerrilla style shirts, were they also popular with Mo troops in the regular CSA?
They were in the MSG before entering Confederate service, which is likely when the photo was taken, and a lot of state guardsmen went to war in battleshirts and overshirts for a uniform. Many Confederate volunteer companies from elsewhere also wore varying styles of battleshirts/overshirts as an early war uniform, though most were replaced by 1862.
 

Patrick H

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#45
As a Missourian, this is very interesting to me. I confess I don't know much about the Missouri Brigade. My study has been more in the line of the Missouri guerrillas, and that's a labyrinth for sure.
 

archieclement

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#46
As a Missourian, this is very interesting to me. I confess I don't know much about the Missouri Brigade. My study has been more in the line of the Missouri guerrillas, and that's a labyrinth for sure.
Not sure which is more tragic between the two..........many times the Mo brigade carried and advanced the farthest on the field, to pay a heavy price because the rest of the army didn't...............
 

AUG

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#48
If anyone has a copy of In Dealdy Earnest, I know of two Missourians who are pictured in the book. Lt. Thomas Jefferson Bankhead and Lt. Col. Amos Riley. Bankhead, who was killed in 1863 was the great Grandson of Thomas Jefferson through his mother, from the Pike County area. My parents were good friends of his great nephew. Amos Riley was killed in 1864 during the Atlanta campaign, 1st Mo. Inf. is buried in New Madrid, Mo. I know his descendants very well. I have seen photos on both in the book, I no longer have it.
@mofederal, just noticed you mentioned Col. A. C. Riley and his photo in this post. I found that photo of Riley online and did a post on him above. Do you know of in what way 1st Lt. Amos Camden Riley Bock was related to him? While looking for addition info on Col. Riley I ran across his story as well.
 
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#51
Here's an image of Colonel Amos Camden Riley, 1st-4th Missouri Infantry.

View attachment 156285
http://collections.mohistory.org/resource/156740

Description on the image: "Col A. C. Riley First Mo. Confd. Infty Killed May 30, 64. New Hope Ga" (written below image). "A. C. Riley Col First Mo Infty C. S. A. Killed May 30/64. at New Hope Church Georgia. While speaking to me about the battle. Jos. Boyce. Capt. Co D 1st Mo. Confed. Infty." (written on reverse side of image). "MAY 24 1915 JOS. BOYCE" (stamped on reverse side). Riley had the photo taken in fall of 1863 fallowing their 'exchange' after Vicksburg; he had it sent to his family through Capt. Joseph Boyce.

Amos Camden Riley was originally born near Louisville, Kentucky, January 22, 1837, but in 1844 at the age of seven he moved to New Madrid, Missouri, with his family. At 14 he entered the Kentucky Military Institute, graduating in 1855, however he would take up farming near Island No. 10 in New Madrid County thereafter. Riley would help organized what would become Company I of the 1st Missouri Infantry (the regiment recruited and organized by John Bowen in Memphis, Tn., in summer of 1861) and was elected first lieutenant. Obviously a very able officer and popular with the men, Riley then rose through the ranks quite rapidly. He was elected captain of the company October 21, 1861, after the former commander resigned. On April 3, 1862, Riley was elected lieutenant colonel fallowing Bowen's promotion to brigadier general; he assumed command of the regiment after Colonel Lucius L. Rich was mortally wounded at Shiloh. Riley was then promoted to colonel in August 1862. He continued to command the 1st Missouri (later consolidated with the 4th Missouri Infantry in November 1862) throughout the rest of his service, until he was shot and killed by a sharpshooter along the front line at New Hope Church during the Atlanta Campaign.

In describing sharp fighting between the picket lines while at New Hope Church, Capt. Joseph Boyce of Co. D, 1st-4th Missouri, writes in his reminiscences that, "It was here we lost our colonel, A. C. Riley, who was killed by a sharpshooter while he was talking to the writer. Other accounts of Col. Riley's death state [he] was killed by a fragment of a shell. Such was not the case. It was a severe blow to the regiment. He was an excellent officer, a thorough soldier and as gentle as a child; brave, watchful and always with his men."

Brig. Gen. Francis M. Cockrell reported to division commander Maj. Gen. Samuel G. French that, "I am grieved to inform you that about 10 minutes before 2 o' clock p.m. today, Col. A. C. Riley, comdg 1st/4th Mo. Infty, one of the most gallant, skillful & meritorious officers of our army was pierced almost through the heart by a minnie ball and died in a few moments. My loss is almost irreparable."

After the war, Riley's father along "with his trusty Servt during all the war," Jeff Patterson, Riley's former body servant, traveled to recover his remains in Atlanta and have him reinterred in the family cemetery near New Madrid, Mo.

Reference: Captain Joseph Boyce and the 1st Missouri Infantry, C.S.A. ed. by William C. Winter.

Here's his memorial on Find A Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=117773022

Riley's letters and several of his battle reports were published in the Missouri Historical Review 85; they can be read online here:
http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/mhr/id/45196/rec/3
http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/mhr/id/45329


Also, if you search his name you'll find what must be a descendant who bore his name, 1st Lt. Amos Camden Riley Bock, also from New Madrid, was a West Point graduate and assigned to the 101st Airborne when he lost his life in Baghdad in 2006. May both brave officers rest in peace.
I've grown up and was raised in and around New Madrid County...Most of the Rileys still farm.... One of the great grandsons Lynn Bock authored a book in Island No. 10 and was an old school Mudsill and as you mentioned his great great grandson was killed overseas...good kid. I did part of my internship at New Madrid Museum and at one time they did have Col. Riley's overcoat and cap on display...and still attached to the cap was a Block "I" button... These five pages have been a great little read... Thanks
 

AUG

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#52
I've grown up and was raised in and around New Madrid County...Most of the Rileys still farm.... One of the great grandsons Lynn Bock authored a book in Island No. 10 and was an old school Mudsill and as you mentioned his great great grandson was killed overseas...good kid. I did part of my internship at New Madrid Museum and at one time they did have Col. Riley's overcoat and cap on display...and still attached to the cap was a Block "I" button... These five pages have been a great little read... Thanks
Thank you and welcome to the forum!
 

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