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Men of the Missouri Brigade

Discussion in 'Other Notable Biographies' started by AUG351, Oct 17, 2014.

  1. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Having previously posted my Men of Hood's Texas Brigade thread, I thought I ought to do one on the 1st Missouri Brigade (CS). As with the Texas Brigade, the Missouri Brigade was filled with incredibly brave and daring men, each with their own story. When these Missourians were first swept up in the war they had no idea that they would fight in countless battles, skirmishes and sieges. They were, in a way, exiled from their home state and orphans just as much so as the famed brigade of Kentuckians. Many never saw old Missouri again, however they forged a reputation as one of the best Confederate brigades in the Western theater.

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    Brig. Gen. Francis M. Cockrell, probably the most well-known officer and commander of the Missouri Brigade.

    Cockrell was described by a newspaper reporter as "six feet and an inch, his weight fully 215 pounds. He has a full, strong habit of body, capable of much labor and strain, mental or physical. He has a bold, aquiline face, long brown hair falling back from a high arched forehead, and long brown mustache and goatee giving amplitude and shading to his features. His eyes are blue and animated and his complexion clear, indicating temperance and health. His manner is hearty and free, with a touch of shrewdness. He has a bright smile in talking. He is a fine man to look at and a good one for a friend to trust to in seasons of doubt and danger."

    Francis Marion Cockrell was born October 1, 1834, near Warrensburg, Missouri. Graduating from Chapel Hill College in 1853, Cockrell studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1855, practicing law in Warrensburg until 1861. With the start of the Civil War, Cockrell enlisted on June 30, 1861, in Lexington as a private in the Missouri State Guard for six months service. He was elected captain of Co. G, 3rd Missouri State Guard the next day, and would see action at Carthage, Wilson's Creek and the Siege of Lexington.

    After Cockrell's six months term of service expired he then transferred to Confederate service, joining Col. John Q. Burbridge's regiment. After much of the MSG was transferred to Confederate service from late 1861 to early 1862, Burbridge's regiment became the 2nd Missouri Infantry in the newly organized 1st Missouri Brigade, with Burbridge still in command. Fallowing Sterling Price into Northwest Arkansas, they would take part in the Battle of Pea Ridge in March 1862. There, the 1st Missouri Brigade was in the thick of the fighting at Elkhorn Tavern.

    On May 12, 1862, after the brigade was reorganized near Corinth, Cockrell was elected lieutenant colonel. He was then quickly promoted to colonel of 2nd Missouri Infantry on June 29 after Burbridge resigned, and would command the regiment in the Iuka-Corinth Campaign. The Missouri Brigade was yet again in the thick of the fight at the Battle of Corinth, October 3-4, 1862. On the second day they charged Battery Powell (one of the redoubts around Corinth) under intense artillery and musketry fire. Cockrell commanded the 2nd Missouri Infantry from the front, cheering his men forward. He was, however, only slightly wounded by a shell fragment and was able to remain on the field.

    Cockrell finally assumed command of 1st Missouri Brigade on April 17, 1863, and was known to have commanded it with distinction throughout the Vicksburg Campaign, leading two ferocious counter-attacks at Port Gibson and Champion Hill. Cockrell then commanded his brigade throughout the Siege of Vicksburg. When a mine was exploded under the 3rd Louisiana Redan on June 25, 1863, Cockrell was blown into the air; however, he soon stood back up, dusted himself off and led the Missourians in a counter-attack against Federal troops trapped in the crater. According to Ephraim M. Anderson of Co. G, 2nd Missouri Infantry, Cockrell cried out, "Forward, my brave old Second Missouri, and prepare to die!"

    After the fall of Vicksburg and parole, Cockrell was officially promoted to brigadier general on July 23, 1863, and was declared 'exchanged' that September. Cockrell would lead the Missouri Brigade for the remainder of the war, throughout the Atlanta Campaign, Tennessee Campaign, and in defense of Mobile at Fort Blakely. Atop Kennesaw Mountain on June 19, 1864, Cockrell was wounded in both hands by a shell fragment, though he was still there to command the brigade when it repelled the Federal attacks up Pigeon Hill on June 27.

    At the Battle of Franklin, Cockrell was wounded four times - shot twice in the right arm, the left leg, and in the right ankle - and had two horses shot out from under him. He later told his son, Ewing, that he "never expected to come out of it alive." In the attack at Franklin the 1st Missouri Brigade suffered a staggering loss: 419 officers and men out of 696, or 60.2%. Miraculously, Cockrell survived his wounds and returned to command the remnants of his old brigade in the Mobile Campaign. The Siege of Fort Blakely, AL, was the Missouri Brigade's last fight; the fort fell to a Federal attack on April 9, 1865.

    After the war, Cockrell returned to Missouri and resumed his law practice. In 1874 he was elected to the United States Senate, where he served thirty years. In 1905, President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Cockrell to the Interstate Commerce Commission, a position he held for five years.

    Cockrell died in Washington, D. C., on December 13, 1915, and is buried in Warrensburg, Missouri. However, Cockrell never forgot his Missourians as long as he lived. Senator Champ Clark of Missouri said that "The secrets of Cockrell's influence over his men were his personal courage and his unfailing kindness. In his estimation superior rank did not place him socially above his fellow citizens who fallowed him enthusiastically from Lexington to the Gulf. He was the father of his soldiers."

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    Brig. Gen. Lewis Henry Little.

    Lewis Henry Little was born in Baltimore, Maryland on March 19, 1817. Little was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 5th U.S. Infantry in 1839 after graduating from West Point. He served in the Mexican War and was awarded a brevet promotion to captain for his service at the Battle of Monterrey in 1846. He was promoted to captain in the regular army on August 20, 1847.

    Little resigned his commission as a U.S. Army officer on May 7, 1861. He helped Sterling Price train the Missouri volunteers that soon joined the Southern armies. He entered the Confederate service as a captain on March 16, 1861, but soon was made an artillery major that same month. Little was promoted to colonel on May 18 and served Price as his Adjutant General in the Missouri State Guard.

    At the Battle of Pea Ridge on March 7, 1862, Little commanded the 1st Missouri Brigade in Price's division. In the thick of the first day's fighting near Elkhorn Tavern, he demonstrated competence and initiative. "During the course of the battle he gradually assumed more and more responsibility until he became the de facto commander of Price's division during the last hours that the Army of the West was on the field." His appointment to brigadier general occurred on April 12.

    Little came east of the Mississippi River with Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn's army and served under Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard at Corinth. There, he caught malaria and was in poor health for the few remaining months of his life. Even so, he was regarded as "a thorough soldier and an excellent disciplinarian." At Corinth he was given command of the 1st Division in Price's Army of the West. His peers praised his division as well drilled and disciplined.

    Maj. Gen. Dabney H. Maury stated that "The magnificent Missouri brigade, the finest body of troops I have ever then seen, or have ever seen since, was the creation of his (Little's) untiring devotion to duty and his remarkable qualities as a commander. In camp he was diligent in instructing his officers in their duty and providing for the comfort and efficiency of his men, and on the battlefield he was as steady and cool and able a commander as I ever seen."

    He led his division at the Battle of Iuka on September 19. At about 5:45 p.m., while sitting on his horse behind the front line and next to Sterling Price, he was struck in the head by a bullet and killed instantly. He was buried at Prices headquarters after the battle by his men, but was eventually reentered at Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore. Afterwards, Price stated "Than this brave Marylander no one could have fallen more dear to me or who's memory should be more fondly cherished by his countrymen."

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    Colonel Elijah Gates, 1st Missouri Cavalry

    Elijah Gates was born on December 17, 1827 in Garrard County, Kentucky. He was the son of John Gates, owner of a large plantation in Kentucky. Unfortunately his father died when he was only a year and a half old. At 20 years old, he moved to Platte County, Missouri in 1846 with his family and subsequently settled on a farm in Buchanan County. In 1852 he married Maria Stamper, and together they had twelve children.

    At the outbreak of the Civil War, Gates enlisted in St. Joseph and was soon elected a captain in the Missouri State Guard, Morgan's Division. When the 1st Missouri Cavalry was organized on December 30, 1861, he was elected colonel of the regiment. He would lead his men in the Battle of Pea Ridge and in a number of skirmishes.

    During the Iuka-Corinth Campaign in fall of 1862, Gates had taken temporary command over the 1st Missouri Brigade. He led it with distinction at the Battle of Corinth, MS on October 3-4, 1862. On the second day of the battle the 1st Missouri Brigade overran the earthen Battery Powell, advancing under a severe crossfire from artillery and small arms fire. They captured, for a period of time, nearly every single Union artillery piece in and around Battery Powell, and busted a giant gap in Rosecrans' final line around Corinth. Gates and his men held the position for several hours under fire until finally driven out - in part by fellow Missourians of the 10th Missouri Infantry (US).

    Gates remained colonel of the 1st Missouri Cavalry and Cockrell took command of the 1st Missouri Brigade. During the Vicksburg Campaign, on May 16, 1863, he would lead his regiment in the devastating counter-attack by Cockrell's and Green's Brigades at Champion Hill, MS. After the Vicksburg Campaign and subsequent parole, the 1st and 3rd Missouri Cavalry were consolidated.

    Gates would command his dismounted Missouri cavalrymen throughout the Atlanta Campaign, Tennessee Campaign, and at Fort Blakely, AL. In the battle of Franklin, TN, Gates once again proved his sheer bravery. After Cockrell was wounded, he assumed command of the brigade. Within minutes he was struck by a Minie ball in one arm, and then the other shortly after. With both arms useless, Gates continued to lead his men forward, sitting upright on his horse and cheering them to the works. Lt. James R. Yerger of Sears' Brigade remembered, "I shall never forget the steady calm gaze of this old hero (Gates) as he sat his horse erect as a statue, his paralyzed arms hanging by his sides." Lt. Charles Cleveland of 1st-3rd MO Cav. eventually helped Gates off his horse and to the rear, where his left arm was amputated.

    Gates recovered from his wounds, along with Cockrell, and both men continued to lead their Missourians in the Siege of Fort Blakely, AL. He was captured with most of the brigade at Blakely on April 9, 1865 - the same day Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox.

    Gates resumed farming when he returned to Buchanan county, and continued in that line until 1874. He was elected sheriff then on the Democratic ticket, and served four years. Col. Gates was then elected treasurer of the state of Missouri, and served four years, residing in Jefferson City for a period of six years, during one year of which he was interested in the commission business in St. Louis. From 1884 to 1886 he was coal oil inspector. For a number of years he was in the transfer and bus business as a member of the firm of Piner & Gates of St. Joseph, but of late years had lived in retirement. He also remained close friends with Cockrell and other Missouri Brigade veterans after the war. Elijah Gates died on March 5, 1915 and is buried in Mount Mora Cemetery in Buchanan County, Missouri.

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    Colonel Hugh Alfred Garland, 1st Missouri Infantry

    As captain of Company F (the Jackson Grays) 2nd Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Militia, Garland was among those taken prisoner at Camp Jackson on May 10, 1861. After his parole, Garland enlisted in Confederate service and became a captain in the 1st Missouri Infantry, participating in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, and Champion Hill. Elected major in 1862, he advanced to lieutenant colonel the following year. After the surrender of Vicksburg, Garland was on recruiting duty at Richmond until he returned to field service. He succeeded to command of the consolidated 1st/4th Missouri Infantry. Colonel Garland was killed in the assault on Franklin, Tennessee, and was buried on the battlefield. He was later reinterred at Bellefontaine Cemetery.

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    Captain Joseph Boyce, the son of Irish immigrants, was born April 4, 1841, in St. Louis. Boyce was interested in military affairs at an early age. When he was 11 years old, he joined the St. Louis Rifle Cadets and by his 17th birthday he was a member of Company A of the St. Louis Grays and a member of Volunteer Fire Company No. 2. Boyce was accepted into the United States Naval Academy but declined the appointment at the bidding of his mother. He was promoted within the ranks of the Grays to orderly sergeant. Boyce participated in Lieutenant Colonel Bowen’s Southwest Expedition along the Missouri-Kansas border and was captured during the Camp Jackson Affair on May 10, 1861.

    After being paroled, Boyce and other former Grays joined Company D of the 1st Missouri Regiment of the Confederate Army which was commanded by Colonel Bowen. Boyce was immediately voted brevet second lieutenant, and was promoted to Captain in 1864, and became the unofficial historian of the Missouri Brigade. During the Civil War, Boyce was reportedly wounded 11 times while fighting in major engagements such as Shiloh, Allatoona, and Franklin. At the Battle of Franklin, Colonel Garland, who was commanding Boyce’s regiment, was killed during the opening shots. Boyce took command of the regiment and led an assault on the Federal position until he was wounded as well. He was rescued by his own troops as they retreated from the battlefield. He served through the end of the war surrendering in May of 1865, at Meridian, Mississippi.

    Captain Boyce's memoirs have been published in Captain Joseph Boyce and the 1st Missouri Infantry edited by William C. Winter.

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    Barnett Atkeson, a merchant in Johnson County, Missouri, joined the Missouri State Guard and fought at the battles of Carthage and Wilson’s Creek. On December 2, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, 1st Missouri Infantry Battalion (later the 5th Missouri Infantry) in Springfield, Missouri. In January 1862, he was elected second lieutenant, and was promoted to first lieutenant in the fall of 1862 and to captain in 1863. Atkeson fought in the battles of Pea Ridge and Iuka, and through the Vicksburg campaign. On November 30, 1864, Captain Atkeson was killed during the Missouri Brigade’s assault on the Federal fortifications at Franklin, Tennessee.

    Carte-de-Visite by Ben Oppenhermet, Mobile, Ala.

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    Thomas Duvall (left) and William Duvall (right), along with their brother Henderson, enlisted in Company C, 3rd Missouri Infantry on December 10, 1861, at Richmond, Missouri, after serving with the Missouri State Guard at Wilson’s Creek and Lexington. William was promoted to junior second lieutenant on May 8, 1862.

    The Duvall brothers fought at Pea Ridge, Farmington, Iuka and Corinth. On October 4, 1862, Lieutenant William Duvall was killed during the Confederate attack on Corinth, while trying to plant the Confederate flag on the Union fortifications. Lieutenant Colonel Finley L. Hubbell, 3rd Missouri Infantry, recorded in his diary that William died waving his sword and shouting “Victory.”

    Thomas Duvall and his brother Henderson were later killed at Champion Hill, Mississippi, on May 16, 1863.

    [​IMG]
    Henderson Duvall was born in 1838 in Culpeper County, Virginia, one of eight children born to the Reverend James and Lydia Duvall. On December 10, 1861, after serving with the Missouri State Guard at Wilson’s Creek and Lexington, Henderson enlisted as a private in Company C, 3rd Missouri Infantry at Richmond, Missouri. His brothers Thomas and William were also members of the company. The Duvall brothers fought at Pea Ridge, Farmington, Iuka, Corinth, and several other battles.

    Henderson and his brother Thomas were killed in action at Champion Hill, Mississippi, on May 16, 1863; brother William was killed at Corinth, Mississippi, on October 4, 1862.

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    Edward Brodie Hull, Jr., began the Civil War as captain of the Pike County Mounted Guards Company in the 4th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Division, Missouri State Guard. He was elected lieutenant colonel of the 4th Cavalry Regiment on August 14, 1861, and was wounded leading the regiment at the siege of Lexington in September 1861.

    Hull enlisted in the 2nd Missouri Infantry on January 16, 1862, at Springfield, Missouri, and was elected lieutenant colonel of the regiment. When the regiment reorganized on April 16, 1862, however, he was not reelected; he was appointed a lieutenant colonel by General Earl Van Dorn and assigned to duty as a recruiting officer.

    Hull was captured in Shreveport, Louisiana in 1865 and held until he signed parole papers on June 9, 1865.

    Carte-de-Visite by John A. Scholten, St. Louis, Mo.

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    Joseph S. Dean, a native of Kentucky and a merchant in St. Louis, enlisted in Company C, 1st Missouri Infantry (CS) at Memphis, Tennessee, in July 1861 and was soon elected a first lieutenant. In January 1862 he was appointed an acting aide-de-camp to General John S. Bowen in the Army of the Mississippi. Dean was severely wounded at the Battle of Shiloh and died a few days later in Memphis, Tennessee.

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    James Kennerly and his brothers Lewis and Samuel, from St. Louis, were members of the Missouri State Militia, where U.S. Captain Nathaniel Lyon forced the surrender of the militia encampment on the edge of St. Louis on May 10, 1861. When they were paroled, all three joined the 1st Missouri Infantry on June 22, 1861, in Memphis, Tennessee. James was elected a lieutenant in Company G on May 22, 1862, and later assigned to Company A. He was wounded slightly at the Battle of Shiloh, and recovered at Corinth.

    Kennerly was captured on April 9, 1865, at Fort Blakely, Alabama, and held at Ship Island before being transferred to New Orleans on April 28, 1865; he was moved to Vicksburg on May 1, 1865, and paroled.

    Carte-de-Visite by J. A. Scholten, St. Louis, Mo.

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    James McCown came to Missouri from Virginia in 1840, settling in Warrensburg, where he became active in community affairs. With the start of the Civil War, he joined the Missouri State Guard with his three sons, and become lieutenant colonel and later colonel of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, 8th Division. When the Confederate 5th Missouri Infantry was organized, McCown was elected colonel; he led the regiment at the battles of Iuka, Corinth, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, and Big Black River. McCown was captured at Vicksburg; when he was exchanged he assumed command of the consolidated Third and Fifth Missouri Infantry and fought at Atlanta, Franklin, and Nashville. McCown and his regiment surrendered at Fort Blakely, Alabama, on April 9, 1865.

    Returning to Warrensburg, McCown died of typhoid fever on July 5, 1867.

    Carte-de-Visite by Duffee & Co., Mobile, Ala.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017

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  3. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    Thanks AUG351.
    That's some great info on the Missouri men.
     
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  4. Gandycreek

    Gandycreek 2nd Lieutenant

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    Enjoyed the post and the pics. Thanks for posting.
     
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  5. Missouri Rebel

    Missouri Rebel Private

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    8675342403_876ec3653c_z.jpg

    Pvt. John Straw 3rd Division Inf. Missouri State Guard
    1/6 plate ambrotype of Pvt. J. Straw from Calloway County, MO. He is on the left with unidentified friend. It appears like he has a pistol butt under the left flap of his jacket. He was wounded at the Battle of Wilson's Creek on Aug. 10, 1861. Man on the right is wearing a homespun battle shirt. Image came from an old collection out of Jefferson City, MO.
    (my collection)
     
  6. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Nice ambrotype Missouri Rebel, thanks for posting. If anyone else has a photo of someone who served in the Missouri Brigade or Missouri State Guard you are welcome to post them too.

    [​IMG]
    John G. Burbridge was a thirty-one year old resident of Louisiana, Missouri, when the Civil War began. In June 1861 he recruited a small band of men and joined the Missouri State Guard, shortly thereafter appointed colonel in command of a regiment. Burbridge would see action in the battles of Carthage and Wilson’s Creek, receiving a head wound in the latter.

    On January 16, 1862, he helped to organize the 2nd Missouri Infantry (Confederate) from state guardsmen who transferred to Confederate service, Burbridge serving as colonel. The regiment became part of the 1st Missouri Brigade and Col. Burbridge led them into action at Pea Ridge in March. He would resigned that summer and return to Missouri to organize the 4th Missouri Cavalry, serving in the Trans-Mississippi throughout the rest of the war. Francis M. Cockrell took command of Burbridge's 2nd Missouri Infantry until he assumed command of the Missouri Brigade.

    http://civilwarmo.org/exhibits/means-war/faces-of-soldiers#item/CWMO-297
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
  7. Patrick H

    Patrick H Captain

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    This is excellent. You are stirring up my Missouri pride! I wish I had a soldier and a story to add to this thread. I sure hope others do. Thank you for launching this thread!
     
  8. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Thanks Patrick, I knew it would get the attention of the Missourians around here :smile:.

    [​IMG]
    Lt. Col. George W. Law of the 1st Missouri Cavalry

    George W. Law served in the Missouri State Guard and Gates' 1st Missouri Cavalry. He was shot in the arm during the retreat at Big Black River, resulting in its amputation. Despite the loss of his arm, when Law recovered he rejoined the regiment and served til the end of the war. After the War, Law became Sheriff of Callaway County, Missouri and in 1873 was mortally wounded by vigilates while transporting a prisoner. Sheriff Law lingered in great pain for a few days, but long enough for his old commander Col. Elijah Gates to arrive. Bending over Law's deathbed Colonel Gates asked Sheriff Law, "Do you know who I am?"... In a weak and low voice Law replied, "I would know that voice anywhere". Sheriff Law passed away quietly a few hours later.

    http://civilwartalk.com/threads/lt-colonel-george-w-law-1st-missouri-cavalry-csa.90994/#post-734968

    Here's his memorial on Find A Grave:
    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...Sst=26&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=88109314&df=all&
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2016
  9. Tumbleweed

    Tumbleweed Sergeant

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    Concerning the Duvall brothers in the first post, another CWT member wrote that Henderson was a cousin, not a brother, and that he had dated one of Henderson's descendants while in high school. The Guerrilla Shirt post #3.
     
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  10. Patrick H

    Patrick H Captain

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    I had to chuckle when I thought about the unintended word play in "Sheriff Law". It's terrible that he had to die as a result of vigilantes. I really like the exchange with Col. Gates.
     
  11. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Yeah, I was looking back in In Deadly Earnest to see if I could can find any further information on Sheriff Law but there didn't seem to be anything. Its too bad, sounds like he was an interesting character.
     
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  12. Missouri Rebel

    Missouri Rebel Private

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    8746964979_3b96c4f698_z.jpg
    Elijah Austin 3rd Missouri INF CSA

    Image probably made while in the Missouri State Guard 2nd INF Regt 4th Division. Enlisted in 3rd MO INF CSA March 1, 1862 in the Boston Mountains in Arkansas. Was in the Battles of Blue Mills, Lexington, Elk Horn, Corinth, Iuka and Vicksburg among others, and was severely wounded in action at Altoona.
    (my collection)
     
  13. Missouri Rebel

    Missouri Rebel Private

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    11326987516_1d92e7dd3e_k.jpg 11327086883_735f1259bd_z.jpg
    Pvt T.W. Sellers 2nd Missouri Cavalry CSA.
    CDV was probably made upon his release from the Gratiot St. Prison.
     
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  14. Seduzal

    Seduzal 2nd Lieutenant

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    Great post, great pictures of which I have not seen before. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  15. Patrick H

    Patrick H Captain

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    Please, Anyone who has soldiers to contribute to this thread (and their stories), please post them. I am truly enjoying this. You can describe me as die-hard Missouri proud, and that applies to my Union ancestor as well as all the wonderful boys in this distinguished Confederate Brigade. I love them all and honor their collective memory!
     
  16. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    [​IMG]
    Lewis Kennerly was one of three brothers (James and Samuel) from St. Louis who were captured at Camp Jackson, where U.S. Captain Nathaniel Lyon forced the surrender of the militia encampment on the edge of St. Louis on May 10, 1861. When they were paroled, all three joined the 1st Missouri Infantry on June 22, 1861, in Memphis, Tennessee. Kennerly was assigned to Company D and elected its first lieutenant on June 22, 1861. He was promoted to captain on July 4, 1862, and became a member of the 1st & 4th Missouri Consolidated Infantry when the regiments merged on November 7, 1862.

    Kennerly was severely wounded in the hip and thigh at the Battle of Shiloh and hospitalized at Corinth, with his wounded brothers and brother-in-law, Brigadier General John S. Bowen. In 1864, incapacitated by wounds, he was assigned to the staff of General Stephen D. Lee. Kennerly surrendered and was held as a prisoner of war in Meridian, Mississippi, where he was paroled on May 10, 1865.

    He died in Mobile, Alabama, on March 9, 1900.

    Carte-de-Visite by Unknown Photographer.

    http://ozarkscivilwar.org/photographs/kennerly-lewis-h/
     
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  17. Patrick H

    Patrick H Captain

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    Ladies and Gentlemen, please keep these pictures and stories coming. I am enjoying this beyond words!
     
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  18. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Who am I to leave out these men! They were both greatly intertwined in the Missouri Brigade's history and commanded the regiments of the brigade at some point in time.

    Bowen-John-S.jpg
    Maj. Gen. John Stevens Bowen. Born in October 1829 near Savannah, Georgia, Bowen graduated from West Point in 1853. He served at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and on the Texas frontier before resigning from the army in 1856. After moving to Missouri the following year, he joined the state militia and worked as an engineer and architect. As a colonel in the Missouri State Militia, Bowen was captured by Captain Nathaniel Lyon at Camp Jackson in May 1861. After his parole, he organized the 1st Missouri Infantry from southern sympathizing Missouri exiles in Memphis, Tennessee. The 1st Missouri Infantry would later joined the Missouri Brigade.

    Bowen commanded a brigade at Shiloh and Corinth, including his 1st Missouri Infantry, and later commanded a division under Pemberton in the Vicksburg Campaign, which consisted of Cockrell's Missouri Brigade and Green's Brigade. After Vicksburg surrendered and Bowen was paroled he became ill with dysentery and died on July 12 outside Raymond, Mississippi.

    Bowen's brother-in-law, a soldier in the 1st Missouri Infantry, said upon Bowen’s death that “our Brigade was like a lot of orphant (sic) children they did not know how to take care of themselves….the men say he was a father to them.”

    Green-Martin-WICR-32000.jpg
    Brig. Gen. Martin E. Green was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, on June 3, 1815. In 1836, he traveled by wagon and boat with his new bride to Lewis County, Missouri, where he established a steam sawmill with his brothers.

    When the Civil War began in 1861, Green organized a cavalry regiment in northeastern Missouri to join the Missouri State Guard. Green led his men in an unsuccessful attack on Col. David Moore’s Union Home Guards at Athens, Missouri, on August 6, 1861. After the Siege of Lexington the following month he was promoted to brigadier general in the State Guard and given command of its Second Division.

    Following the Battle of Pea Ridge, Green was commissioned a Confederate brigadier general and assumed command of a brigade in Sterling Price's Division - his brigade containing some of the Missouri troops that would later join of the 1st Missouri Brigade. Green led them into action at Corinth, suffering heavy losses in a charge on October 3, 1862.

    In the Vicksburg Campaign his brigade, consisting of Arkansas and Missouri troops, was engaged at Port Gibson and fought beside the 1st Missouri Brigade in Bowen's famous counter-attack at Champion Hill. During the Siege of Vicksburg Green was slightly wounded on June 25, 1863. Two days later Green looked over a parapet and was instantly struck in the head and killed by a bullet from a Union sharpshooter. He is said to have been buried in the Cedar Hill Cemetery in Vicksburg.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
  19. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Colonel Eugene Erwin, 6th Missouri Infantry.

    Born October 2, 1833, in Lexington, Kentucky, Andrew Eugene Erwin (known as Eugene) was the grandson of the statesman Henry Clay. After working for the Pacific Mail Steamship Company in Monterey, California for some time, Eugene was introduced to Josephine Deborah Russell, the daughter of Colonel William Russell, California’s Secretary of State. She and Eugene later settled in Independence, Missouri and were married.

    When the war began Eugene entered the Missouri State Guard, serving at Wilson's Creek, Lexington, Springfield, and Pea Ridge. With Sterling Price's Division he crossed the Mississippi in April 1862. As the state guardsmen in Price's Division were transferred to Confederate service, Eugene was promoted to colonel of the 6th Missouri Infantry after it was organized in August 1862. He proved to be a natural born leader and gained the approval and praises of his men.

    Commanding the 6th Missouri into battle for the first time at Corinth, October 3, 1862, he was wounded through the foot in a frontal assault and carried from the field. The 6th Missouri suffered as loss of 71% at Corinth. Weakened by his wound, Eugene fell ill with tuberculosis. His wife Josephine and 10-year-old daughter Lula traveled miles across the lines to visit him in Grand Gulf, Mississippi. Despite his illness he still led the 6th Missouri into the Vicksburg Campaign.

    During the Siege of the Vicksburg, when the mine was exploded under the 3rd Louisiana Redan on June 25, 1863, Col. Erwin led his regiment in support of the Louisianians. While cheering his men to the crater, calling to them, "Come on, my brave boys, don't let the Third Regiment get ahead of you!" he was shot and killed. Col. Eugene Erwin was a celebrated commander in the ranks of the Missouri Brigade and his death was mourned by all.

    Josephine was pregnant with her fourth child and faced with the task of returning home to Missouri. She arranged a meeting with General Grant, who arranged transportation by steamboat to St. Louis. Before his death, Eugene had given the 6th Missouri's since replaced Van Dorn battle flag to his wife for safe keeping. She had sewn it to the inside of her dress and carried it through the lines, even while meeting with Gen. Grant. Josephine later moved to Kentucky and remarried, though she never forgot Eugene and always attended reunions of the 6th Missouri Infantry with the regiment's battle flag.

    Reference: https://www.nps.gov/shil/upload/The-Colonel-and-his-Lady.pdf

    Colonel Erwin's memorial on Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6520926

    Photo of Eugene's widow, Mrs. Josephine Russell Erwin Clay.
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    And the 6th Missouri Infantry's Van Dorn battle flag that she carried through the lines, which is on display at the Civil War Interpretive Center in Corinth, MS.
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    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017
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  21. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Joseph Birtley Wright, a minister and native of Randolph County, Missouri, was a resident of Pettis County when he enlisted in the Confederate army on January 1, 1862, in Springfield, Missouri. He served as a private in Company G, 5th Missouri Infantry and participated in several actions, then was promoted to chaplain of the 1st Missouri Cavalry in 1863. In 1864, he is listed in official records as chaplain of General Francis M. Cockrell’s First Missouri Brigade.

    “Lizzie accept this as a token of esteem and fidelity from J. B. Wright” is written on the back of the photograph. No further information is available on the identity of Lizzie.

    Carte-de-Visite by Ben Oppenheimer, Mobile, Ala.

    http://ozarkscivilwar.org/photographs/239/
     
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