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Men of Hood's Texas Brigade

Discussion in 'Period Civil War Photos & Examinations' started by AUG351, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. James N.

    James N. Captain Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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  3. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    I was wondering if there was any further info on Pvt. Andrew Jackson Read. Also interested in Les Jensen's examination of the Chicago/Camp Douglas Confederate prisoners photograph in that issue as well.
    Thanks
     
    OldBrainsHalleck likes this.
  4. civilken

    civilken 2nd Lieutenant

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    once again I do not recall answering this particular post chances are I might have.. The only thing I can say about general hoods man was when Sam Watkins said the man wanted to leave after they heard he had taken over from JohnsonI know everyone's going to say that after the war they all loved him maybe they did but during the war even forest wanted to shoot him.
     
  5. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Bump for anniversary of Gaines' Mill.

    polk_j_m.jpg
    Postwar photo of James M. Polk, who served in Co. I "Navarro Rifles", 4th Texas Infantry. Born and raised in Missouri, Polk settled in Navarro County, Texas, at 21 years old in 1859. In July 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Clinton M. Winkler's Navarro Rifles. He was wounded in the arm at Gaines' Mill and again at Chickamauga, a minie ball entering his head in the temple in front of the right ear and lodging in the back of his head. He was sent to Richmond and the bullet was later removed by a surgeon. Recovering by March 1864, at the request of General Hood, Polk was commissioned captain on December 18, 1863, and transported back to the Trans-Mississippi, where he joined Gen. Sterling Price's army in Arkansas. Why he didn't rejoin the Texas Brigade isn't clear, but perhaps he decided he'd rather fight for his native Missouri, or at least closer to home, whether it be Missouri or Texas. He was later captured on a secret recruiting mission in St. Louis and was imprisoned in Alton, Illinois, from June 29, 1864, until the end of the war.

    More on Polk: http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txnavarr/biographies/p/polk_j_m.htm

    His memoir, The Confederate Soldier; and Ten Years in South America can be read online here: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433115688214;view=2up;seq=6

    Here is Polk's wooden canteen: https://www.skinnerinc.com/auctions/2856M/lots/163
     
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  6. James N.

    James N. Captain Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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    That canteen's a beauty!

    identified-4th-texas-gardner-pattern-canteen.jpg
     
    Rio Bravo and Greywolf like this.

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