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Men of Hood's Texas Brigade

Discussion in 'Period Civil War Photos & Examinations' started by AUG351, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. RangerJoe

    RangerJoe Private

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    I was quite suprized and a bit disappointed about Hill Jr. College (Hood's Archives). I gave them quite a list of soldiers I need photos for, around 50. I was only able to get nine photographs from them. Some of the photographs they didn't have I found in other publications that credited the Texas Heritage Museum as the source of the photo. I don't know whether they really tried to find the photos or not.

    I am going up there this time and look at their files (photo files) and check myself for the photographs I need. Haven't been to Sam Houston yet though.
     
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  3. James S.

    James S. Private

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    Would love to see you do one on the Texas Brigade in the Seven Days Battles.
     
  4. RangerJoe

    RangerJoe Private

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    Thank you for the link to Blessing's photo! Any pictures of the soldiers is great with me, they don't have to be wartime...
     
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  5. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    A couple more to add to the list. From the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photography Collection.

    Private_George_L_Robertson_Confederate_States_Army.jpg
    George L. Robertson in Co. B, Tom Green Rifles, 4th Texas Infantry.

    ROBERTSON, GEO. L. - Prom., 1Cpl., July 24, 1862: W. (neck & shoulder) & POW, Antietam (Sept. 17, 1862): Exchanged: Wound furlough granted, Dec., 1862: AWOL in Tex. since May 3, 1863: Paroled, Austin, July 27, 1865.

    Robertson served in the same company as Val C. Giles. All Giles has to say of him in his company roster is:
    "Robertson, George L.; was left on the battlefield at Sharpsburg for dead; recovered, returned to Texas and died in Austin in 1898."

    William_R_Hamby.jpg
    William R. "Bill" Hamby, also a member of Co. B, Tom Green Rifles, 4th Texas Infantry.

    According to J.B. Polley's history of the brigade, p. 293, Hamby served in the regiment until November 1862, after which he was discharged due to wounds suffered at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. He returned to Texas in March 1863 and set out to join Morgans cavalry with ten other men; they were attached to Helm's Scouts in the 10th Kentucky Cavalry. Hamby was made First Lieutenant then, which was probably around when this photo was taken. His company later became Co. H of the 13th Kentucky Cavalry. Hamby was wounded and captured in July 1863, later exchanged and returned to active duty. He was in command of the company when they surrendered and were paroled on April 26, 1865. Some of Hamby's reminiscences are also included in Polley's history of the Texas Brigade.

    In his company roster, Val C. Giles says of Hamby:
    "Hamby, Wm. R., handsomest man in the regiment, severely wounded at Second Manassas and before recovery went into battle at Sharpsburg—without shoes—but came out shod. After the war closed he went to Nashville, Tenn., and when Porter was elected governor of that state he appointed Hamby as Adjutant General; later on his returned to Texas, represented Travis county in the legislature, and is now President of the Citizens' Bank and Trust Company."

    Here is Hamby's memorial on Find A Grave:
    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...Sst=46&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=51397805&df=all&

    Both Robertson and Hamby are seen in this group portrait of Company B, Tom Green Rifles, taken in 1897 during a reunion in Nashville, TN. Robertson is at back row, third from left. Hamby is middle row, third from left.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Rio Bravo

    Rio Bravo First Sergeant

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    AUG - Were the Tom Green rifles named after Brig. Gen Thomas Green 1814-1864 ? Rio
     
  7. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Yes, it was organized in Austin, recruited mainly from Travis County. The company originated from a prewar militia unit named the Quitman Rifles, organized in Austin in 1858, but it was later renamed after Thomas Green who was the commandant of Camp Clark (their camp of instruction) at the time, before they marched off for Virginia. According to Val C. Giles, the name change was done at the suggestion of Sgt. Charles McAnnelly. Tom Green was also a very prominent man in Austin, so all the recruits probably knew him well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
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  8. Legion Para

    Legion Para Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    "Star Rifles", Company D, 1st Texas.

    The identity of these Texans is known, unfortunately I don't have that information at my finger tips. One of them was a photographer.

    star_rifles.gif
     
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  9. AndyHall

    AndyHall Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    Tom Blessing?

    Val Giles thought he was the only one with a ridiculous hat. Ha!
     
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  10. bdtex

    bdtex Brigadier General Moderator

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    The one standing on the left is Lt. Cornelius R. Curtright. That photo is on display at the Jefferson Historical Society Museum: 2016-08-13 17.40.48.jpg
     
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  11. Legion Para

    Legion Para Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Thank you @bdtex.
     
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  12. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    There aren't many photos of men who served in the 3rd Arkansas out there, and we don't have any here besides Col. Van Manning in post #38. Well, while searching through Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Arkansas in the Civil War on Google Books I ran across this image of Richard Jesse Bailey. He served in Co. H, known as the "Orphan Company" as it consisted of a mix of Kentuckians and Arkansans.

    Richard J. Bailey.jpg

    Here's his memorial on Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...Sst=4&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=171639577&df=all&
     
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  13. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Also been meaning to post these members of the 5th Texas Infantry....

    [​IMG]
    Sergeant Major John Marquis "Mark" Smither in Co. D, "Waverly Confederates," 5th Texas Infantry.

    Smither (1844-1925) was born in Walker County, Texas on January 1, 1844. At only 17 he enlisted in Company D of the 5th Texas, and was later promoted to the rank of sergeant major when he turned 18. He served in nearly every major campaign with the Texas Brigade, was wounded at Chickamauga, and surrendered at Appomattox. After the war, he became a respected judge of Walker County Texas and was elected Judge of the Twelfth Judicial District where he served for 12 years. He wrote many letters home throughout the war, which have served as a major source of information in Simpson's and William's histories of the Texas Brigade, as well as the recent history on the 5th Texas Infantry, The Bloody Fifth by Schmutz.


    [​IMG]
    Postwar photo of Smither.

    Photos from his Find A Grave memorial: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...Sst=46&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=55474288&df=all&

    [​IMG]
    Lieutenant Colonel John C. Upton

    Here's his short bio in The Bloody Fifth by Schmutz, p. 319-320:
    "Upton, John Cunningham was born on a farm near Winchester in Franklin County, Tennessee, January 22, 1828, and attended the University of Lebanon. He farmed on the family estate until leaving Tennessee in 1850, first traveling to California to pan for gold. He remained there until 1859. While in California, his family moved to Texas. He arrived in Colorado County and took charge of his mother's plantation. In early 1861, Upton raised a company--later Company B--and was chosen as its captain. Promoted to major in fall of 1861, he became lieutenant colonel on July 17, 1862. Upton was noted for his informal dress--he often wore a red undershirt into battle--and for his unorthodox battle tactics. Upton's brother, William Felton Upton, joined Nichol's Regiment and served as a lieutenant colonel. John Upton was killed leading his men at Second Manassas. William returned to Texas in 1865, farmed the family plantation, and established a mercantile business in Schulenburg. He served several terms in the state legislature and died in Schulenburg on February 7, 1887. Upton County in West Texas is named in honor of these two brothers."

    Like many officers in the Texas Brigade, Upton was quite a character. He's probably best known for going into battle at Gaines' Mill wielding a frying pan, and accepting an armful of swords from the polished officers of a New Jersey regiment that surrendered to his Texans.

    Photo from Upton's memorial on Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=42787977

    [​IMG]
    This Don Troiani painting depicts Lt. Col. Upton just as he is killed, shot through the head while leading the regiment into the fight at 2nd Manassas. As the Fifth ran out of the tree line and engaged the 5th New York Zouaves on the open hill top, Upton grabbed the colors and shouted "Come on, boys, fallow me" just before he was shot. He fell into the arms of his adjutant, Lt. Campbell Wood.

    Capt. Belcher P. Fuller, Co. A, 5th Texas Infantry.jpg
    Captain Belcher P. Fuller, Co. A, "Bayou City Guards," 5th Texas Infantry.

    "Fuller, Belcher Pugh was born April 13, 1836, in North Carolina, the son of Col. Nathan Fuller, a lineal descendant of John Rolfe. In 1843, his family moved to Houston, where Nathan became the city's twelfth mayor in 1853. B. Pugh Fuller . . . was a member of the Washington Light Guards prior to the war, as well as a practicing attorney. His sister, Matilda Jane Fuller Young, made the famous battle flag for the regiment and later became known as the "Mother" of Hood's Texas Brigade. Fuller enlisted with the Bayou City Guards on July 9, 1861, and was elected its third lieutenant that November. On September 1, 1863, he was promoted to first lieutenant. He was seriously wounded at the Wilderness on May 6, 1864. After the war, Fuller returned to his law practice. He died on March 12, 1876, and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Houston."
    - The Bloody Fifth, p. 301

    Apparently Fuller was later promoted to captain and commanded his company in the last months of the war.

    Here's his Find A Grave memorial: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...Sst=46&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=19652781&df=all&

    Captain D. C. Farmer, Co. A, 5th Texas Infantry.jpg
    Captain D. C. Farmer, Co. A, "Bayou City Guards," 5th Texas Infantry.

    D. C. Farmer, a twenty-five-year-old teacher, originally from Kentucky, enlisted in the Bayou City Guards in Houston on July 19, 1861, and was soon after elected third lieutenant. He was promoted to captain November 1, 1861, made acting major of the regiment on October 31, 1863, and acting lieutenant colonel in December of that year. Throughout his service Farmer was wounded at Gettysburg and again at the Wilderness; he was thereafter sent back to Texas in summer of 1864 on recruiting duty, where he remained for the duration of the war.

    [​IMG]
    First Lieutenant James Edward Cobb, Co. F, "The Company Invincibles," 5th Texas Infantry.

    "Cobb, James Edward was born October 5, 1835, In Thomaston. Upson County, Georgia. Upon graduating from Emory College in Oxford, Georgia in June of 1856, he taught school and studied law. Cobb passed the bar and immigrated to Texas in 1857, first residing in Quitman then Henderson, where he practiced law until 1860. He moved to Galveston, and then Beaumont, where he taught school until Texas seceded. He enlisted with the Company Invincibles in July, 1861 as a private. Promoted to second lieutenant soon thereafter, he became first lieutenant on August 30, 1862. He was captured at Gettysburg and confined at Fort Delaware and then Johnson's Island, Ohio, where he remained until February 7, 1864. Cobb ultimately moved to Point Lookout, and then to Charleston Harbor, where he was exposed to the guns together with the rest of the "Immortal Six Hundred." He was paroled May 17, 1865, from Johnson's Island, and returned home to Thomaston, Georgia after the war, settling in Tuskegee, Alabama, where he gained considerable fame as a noted jurist, and was elected to Congress in 1886. Cobb remained there until 1896, and returned to the practice of law in Tuskegee. He was also the editor of the Tuskegee News from 1869 to 1874. He died in East Las Vegas, San Miguel County, New Mexico, on June 2, 1903, and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Tuskegee, Alabama."
    - The Bloody Fifth, p. 296-297

    His Find A Grave memorial: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...GSst=3&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=25204820&df=all&

    [​IMG]
    Captain John W. Kerr, Co. I, "The Texas Aides," 5th Texas Infantry.

    Schmutz didn't include a biographical sketch of Kerr in his book, but from what I can find Kerr was originally 2nd lieutenant in Company I but was promoted to 1st lieutenant on October 23, 1861. In August 1862 he was appointed adjutant for the regiment and was then appointed acting assistant brigade adjutant in October of that year. Kerr was promoted to captain on November 2, 1863, and to brigade inspector general on December 3, 1863. He was paroled with the brigade at Appomattox.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017
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  14. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Third Lt. Banjamin A. Campbell, Co. G, 1st Texas Infantry.jpg
    Third Lieutenant Benjamin A. Campbell, Co. G, "Reagan Guards," 1st Texas Infantry.
    Campbell enlisted at Palestine, Texas, January 23, 1861 and served with the Texas Brigade up until Gettysburg. In the fighting at Houck's Ridge and Devil's Den on July 2, Lt. Col. Work, commanding the 1st Texas, sent Lt. Campbell with Co. G to cover a gap between the 1st Texas and the 3rd Arkansas. While leading the company Campbell was shot through the heart and killed.

    Inscribed inside the case, behind the image is: "Likeness of B.A. Campbell taken in Richmond, Virginia 1861 and presented to his wife Eppi Campbell."
     
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  15. civilken

    civilken Sergeant Major

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    Gen. Hood certainly had his problems but I don't believe there is anybody who can question his courage.. As a division commander he always led from the front.
     
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  16. AndyHall

    AndyHall Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    I don't think this has been posted before; it's a new image to me. Here is Val Giles of the Fourth Texas in 1866, via the Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin:

    [​IMG]

    Here he is in 1861 and 1897:
    [​IMG]
     
  17. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Attention all the fans of Hood's Texas Brigade on the forum! I just posted the "official" Hood's Texas Brigade thread in the brand new Regimental Histories Forum: http://civilwartalk.com/threads/hoods-texas-brigade.130089/

    Feel free to add any more information there you find interesting, other than what has already been posted here. I'd still like to keep these two threads separate; the other thread can sort of serve as an index to the Texas Brigade and this thread can still serve its purpose as a photo collection.
     
  18. Greyfalcon

    Greyfalcon Corporal

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    Your single OP was more informative than what I have found in many CW books covering the topic. Thank you! :thumbsup:
     
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  19. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Here's an officer of the 1st Texas Infantry who hasn't been posted yet. Not too many photos of 1st Texans out there. The first image is from J. B. Polley's Letters to Charming Nellie and the second photo was originally posted on Flickr.

    Captain Elbert S. Jemison, Co. G, 1st Texas Infantry.jpg
    Captain Elbert S. Jemison, Co. G "Reagan Guards", 1st Texas Infantry.

    (1) JEMISON, ELBERT S. iLt. - W., Gaines' Mill (June 27, 1862): W., Antietam (Sept.17, 1862): Elect., Capt., Aug. 9, 1863: Detailed to recruiting serv., Trans-Miss. Dept., Spring, 1864: Resgnd., Aug. 9, 1864.

    Here he is on Find A Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/...rel=all&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=7065363&df=all&

    Elbert and Louisa Jemison.jpg
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/50245058@N03/6083696114/

    Description from Flickr:
    Elbert S. Jemison and his bride Louisa A. McElderry (b.1842 - d.1939) are shown on their wedding trip in 1858. Louisa A. McElderry was the daughter of Thomas McElderry, one of Talladega Counties pioneer families. Thomas fought along side of Andrew Jackson at the Battle of Talladega. Louisa married Elbert Jemison in Talladega on October 26, 1858.

    Elbert S. Jemison, a native of Talladega, Alabama, attended LaGrange College, read law in the office of L. E. Parsons, and was admitted to the bar in Talladega at an early age. He left for Texas soon afterward where he remained most of his life. He was a Captain in the Confederate Army of Texas, serving in the 1st Texas Infantry. After the war, he entered the Cotton Brokerage business and wholesale grocery business in Houston, Texas. He later purchased a seat on the New York Cotton Exchange, and was controlling stockholder and President of the Houston East Texas Railway Company, which he later sold to the Harriman Interest in New York, which is now part of the Southern Pacific system

    The couple retired back to Talladega and Elbert passed away shortly thereafter in 1896. His widow built a large mansion on the corner of South and Cherry Streets and spent the remainder of her years as a local philanthropist, contributing time and money to various causes - churches, hospitals, parks, and libraries to name a few. Her home is known locally as the Jemison-Purefoy Home. It is the property of the Alabama Institute of the Deaf and Blind, where it serves as a dormitory.
     
  20. MHB1862

    MHB1862 Private

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    Manning also commanded the attack launched on the Right flank of French's Division attacking the Sunken Road at Sharpsburg. Along with the 27th NC the 3rd made the attack at Longstreet's order and were successful in relieving pressure on that part of the line before the collapse of the position. The two regiments drove off Union artillery in position where the visitor's center stands today and cleared out the Roulette cornfield before being driven back by reinforcements from the Union left.
    IMO there are few better examples of remarkable small unit fighting on any field during the war.
     
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  21. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
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