Ami's SOA Men of Hood's Texas Brigade

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
Edit: I'll continually go back and add a few more photos to these posts here on the first page, either images that were buried in later pages of this thread or that I have since found elsewhere.

GenHood2.jpg

Of course we can't leave out John Bell Hood. Most are aware of Hood's time as a division commander in the ANV and later for his unsuccessful (to put it lightly) career as a corps and army commander in the AoT. But before all of that Hood was was only colonel of the 4th Texas Infantry and later brigadier general in command of the Texas Brigade. In April 1861, Hood resigned his commission from the U.S. Army, enlisting in the Confederate Army at Montgomery, Alabama, the following month. After Col. Robert T. P. Allen of the 4th Texas Infantry resigned, Hood was appointed colonel of the regiment in Sept. 1861. He drilled the 4th Texas thoroughly in fall of that year, but still managed to earn the Texans' respect - to the point where they would follow him anywhere.

On Feb. 20, 1862, Hood assumed command of the Texas Brigade and was officially promoted to brigadier general on March 3, 1862. He commanded the brigade throughout the Peninsula Campaign and into the Seven Days. In the battle of Gaines' Mill on June 27, Hood took his place among the ranks of the 4th Texas Infantry and personally led the famed charge across Boatswain's Creek. The Texas Brigade was the first to break the Federal line at Gaines' Mill, and in the process captured a total of 14 artillery pieces, dozens of prisoners, and turned back a cavalry charge. In July 1862, Hood assumed command of the division after the former commander left on medical furlough. He was promoted to major general in October of that year and given full command of the division. From there, Hood's record moves away from the brigade; however, Hood's Texas Brigade would forever bear his name, and he would always be remembered as their favorite brigade commander.

220px-JBRobertson.jpg

Brig. Gen. Jerome B. Robertson.
Robertson, originally born in Kentucky, later moved to and accepted Texas as his adopted state. In 1861, Robertson raised a volunteer company - later Co. I of the 5th Texas Infantry. He was elevated through the ranks, promoted to lieutenant colonel in November 1861 and to colonel on June 1, 1862. He fought with the regiment in the Peninsula Campaign, the Seven Days, and Second Manassas, being wounded in the latter. Overcome by exhaustion at South Mountain, he was carried from the field, missing the battle of Antietam.

Overall, Robertson was popular among the troops and was known as "Aunt Polly" because he was always concerned with their well-being. After the promotion of Hood, Robertson was promoted to brigadier general on November 1, 1862. He commanded the Texas Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign (in which he was wounded), at Chickamauga and Chattanooga, and in the Knoxville Campaign. But due to tension amongst Longstreet's Corps in the Knoxville Campaign, Longstreet filed charges against Robertson alleging delinquency of duty and accusing him of pessimistic remarks. Robertson was reprimanded, replaced as commander of the Texas Brigade and transferred to Texas, where he commanded the state reserve forces until the end of the war. He was sorely missed by the troops of the brigade; in the words of Joe Polley, Co. F, 4th Texas, "The Texas Brigade heartily approved of his course, and its survivors are yet grateful to him for the firm stand he took and for the interest and fatherly solicitude he always manifested in the well-being of his men."

5320329455_d1815961b2_o.jpg

Brig. Gen. John Gregg, the Texas Brigade's last brigadier general.
John Gregg, an Alabama native who later moved to Fairview, Texas, had organized and commanded the 7th Texas Infantry after the war began. In command of the 7th Texas, he fought and was captured at Fort Donelson. Shortly after being exchanged on August 15, 1862, Gregg was promoted to brigadier general and commanded a brigade in the Vicksburg Campaign, fighting at Raymond and Jackson, Mississippi.

In the battle of Chickamauga, Gregg was severely wounded when he rode ahead of his own brigade, too close to an enemy skirmish line, and was shot in the neck. Hood's Texas Brigade just so happened to stumble across Gregg lying wounded on the field, helping him and his horse to the rear. After recovering from his wounds, Gregg was given command of the very brigade that had saved him at Chickamauga, replacing Robertson.

He led the Texans in the Overland Campaign - including the "Lee to the rear" incident at the Wilderness - and the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign. In the Texas Brigade's last charge of the war at the battle of Darbytown and New Market Roads on October 7, 1864, Gregg was shot in the neck a second time and died of his wounds. His widow, Mary Garth Gregg, traveled through the lines to retrieve his body. Gregg was laid to rest at the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Aberdeen, Mississippi.

star-rifles-1st-texas-infantry-jpg.jpg

Members of the Star Rifles, Company D of the 1st Texas Infantry, from Jefferson, Marion County, Texas.

Standing L-R: Lt. Cornelius R. Curtright, Absalom Carter "A.C." Oliver, Henry P. Oliver
Seated L-R: John A. Oliver, William H. Oliver, Francis Thomas "Frank" Oliver

Lt. Curtright later resigned in 1862; Henry and John Oliver died of pneumonia early that year. William died of wounds received at Chickamauga. Only Absalom and Francis made it to Appomattox.

Third Lt. Benjamin A. Campbell, Co. G, 1st Texas Infantry 1.jpg

Lt. Benjamin A. Campbell, Co. G "Reagan Guards," 1st Texas Infantry. Born in Alabama in 1842, Campbell later moved to Anderson County, Texas, with his family. He was married to Eppinina "Eppie" Micheaux in May 1860, they later having a son. In June 1861 he enlisted in the Reagan Guards, Company G of the 1st Texas, and was elected 3rd lieutenant. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in May 1862 (later rising to 1st lieutenant according to some sources), and was sent back to Texas on recruiting service in October to December 1862.

Campbell was acting commander of Company G at Gettysburg. As the 1st Texas fought its way up Houck's Ridge on July 2, 1863, a gap started to form between it and the 3rd Arkansas on its left, so Lt. Col. Philip A. Work sent Campbell with his company to plug it. As he fulfilled that task Campbell took a shot through the heart and was killed instantly.

Lt. Col. Work says in his official report:
"While this regiment was closely following our skirmishers, and had reached to within about 125 yards of the enemy's artillery, the Third Arkansas Regiment, upon my left, became hotly engaged with a strong force of the enemy upon its front and left, and, to preserve and protect its left flank, was forced to retire to a point some 75 or 100 yards to my rear and left, thus leaving my left flank uncovered and exposed, to protect which I halted, and threw out upon my left and rear Company G, commanded by Lieut. B. A. Campbell (some 40 men), which soon engaged the enemy and drove them from their threatening position to my left and the front of the Third Arkansas. It was while in the execution of this order that Lieutenant Campbell, a brave and gallant officer, fell, pierced through the heart."

Inscribed inside the case, behind the image is: "Likeness of B.A. Campbell taken in Richmond, Virginia 1861 and presented to his wife Eppie Campbell."

Here is the link to an article on him in Military Images Magazine:
https://militaryimages.atavist.com/for-life-and-lone-star-honor-summer-2017


Private_Emzy_Taylor_left_Confederate_from_Georgetown_Texas.jpg

Cousins, Pvt. Emzy Taylor (left) and Pvt. George M. Taylor, Company E, "Lone Star Guards," 4th Texas Infantry. Emzy enlisted July 13, 1861, at Waco. He received a discharge for disability on December 4, 1861, and returned to Texas. He would later help organize a company in the 16th Texas Infantry and serve in the Red River Campaign. George enlisted July 13, 1861, at Waco. He was wounded in the arm at Gaines' Mill and was listed sick in hospital at Richmond several times throughout the war, though he surrendered and was paroled at Appomattox.

1580ce89968b8247577b5c2a5edc09d0.jpg

Pvt. Jacob F. Lown, Co. H, "Porter Guards," 4th Texas Infantry.
Lown enlisted at Grimes County on March 14, 1862. He was wounded in the battle of Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862, and was captured near Knoxville in late 1863. He died at the U.S. Military General Hospital at Louisville on January 18, 1863, and was buried in Grave 71, Range 2, of Cave Hill Cemetery there.

Val C. Giles 4.jpg

Sgt. Valerius Cincinnatus Giles, born in Shelby County, Tennessee, Jan. 26, 1843. In 1849 he and his family settled on a farm near Austin, Texas. At 18 he enlisted in the Tom Green Rifles, Co. B of the 4th Texas Infantry, and served with the Texas Brigade from 1861 to mid 1864, until he was captured at Wauhatchie (aka Raccoon Mountain by the Texans) on Oct. 29, 1863. Giles was sent to Camp Morton, though he managed to escape soon after, later joining Walker Taylor's cavalry command in Kentucky, which he served with for the remainder of the war. Giles later authored the memoir, Rags and Hope.

private_george_l_robertson_confederate_states_army-jpg.jpg

George L. Robertson in Co. B, Tom Green Rifles, 4th Texas Infantry.

ROBERTSON, GEO. L. - Prom., 1Cpl., July 24, 1862: W. (neck & shoulder) & POW, Antietam (Sept. 17, 1862): Exchanged: Wound furlough granted, Dec., 1862: AWOL in Tex. since May 3, 1863: Paroled, Austin, July 27, 1865.

Robertson served in the same company as Val C. Giles. All Giles has to say of him in his company roster is:
"Robertson, George L.; was left on the battlefield at Sharpsburg for dead; recovered, returned to Texas and died in Austin in 1898."

william_r_hamby-jpg.jpg

William R. "Bill" Hamby, also a member of Co. B, Tom Green Rifles, 4th Texas Infantry.

According to J.B. Polley's history of the brigade, p. 293, Hamby served in the regiment until November 1862, after which he was discharged due to wounds suffered at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. He returned to Texas in March 1863 and set out to join Morgans cavalry with ten other men; they were attached to Helm's Scouts in the 10th Kentucky Cavalry. Hamby was made First Lieutenant then, which was probably around when this photo was taken. His company later became Co. H of the 13th Kentucky Cavalry. Hamby was wounded and captured in July 1863, later exchanged and returned to active duty. He was in command of the company when they surrendered and were paroled on April 26, 1865. Some of Hamby's reminiscences are also included in Polley's history of the Texas Brigade.

In his company roster, Val C. Giles says of Hamby:
"Hamby, Wm. R., handsomest man in the regiment, severely wounded at Second Manassas and before recovery went into battle at Sharpsburg—without shoes—but came out shod. After the war closed he went to Nashville, Tenn., and when Porter was elected governor of that state he appointed Hamby as Adjutant General; later on his returned to Texas, represented Travis county in the legislature, and is now President of the Citizens' Bank and Trust Company."

Giles, Robertson and Hamby are seen in this group portrait of Company B, Tom Green Rifles, taken in 1897 during a reunion in Nashville, TN.
tom-green-rifles-cv-5-nov-1897-p-545-jpg.jpg


Rufus K. Felder and cousin Miers Felder, Co. E, 5th Texas Infantry 2.jpg

Rufus K. Felder (left) and his cousin Miers Felder in Co. E, 5th Texas Infantry. Coming from a prominent and wealthy family in South Carolina, Rufus Felder accompanied his widowed mother and four siblings to a new family plantation in Chappell Hill, Texas, in 1855. Many wealthy families from across the South settled into the Chappell Hill area, for the Brazos floodplains yielded good cotton. Rufus was a student at Soule University when the war began; at 21 years old, he and his cousin Miers (29) enlisted in Capt. John Rogers' Dixie Blues at Washington, Texas, on July 11, 1861. Rufus served with the Texas Brigade throughout the war until Appomattox, although his cousin Miers was discharged due to wounds at Second Manassas.

loughridge_j_r.jpg

Lt. James Rodgers Loughridge, Co. I, "Navarro Rifles," 4th Texas Infantry.
Born on November 12, 1821 in Laurens, SC, Loughridge later moved to Corsicana, Texas to practice law. He founded the first newspaper in Corsicana, the Prairie Blade, in 1855. That same year Loughridge married Mary Felicia Martin of Corn Ridge, Tennessee; they had six children. I'm not certain where he started, but after the war began Loughridge found himself elected 1st Lieutenant in Co. I, 4th Texas Infantry. He was wounded at Gaines' Mill in June 1862. On July 21, 1863, after Capt. Clinton M. Winkler was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, Loughridge was promoted to captain of his company. He was cited for bravery at the battle of Chickamauga and then resigned from the army on November 10, 1863, upon his election to the Texas House of Representatives. After the Civil War, Loughridge owned a cotton warehouse at Loughridge Bluff on the Trinity River near Rural Shade and Kerens. He served on a committee that convinced the Houston and Texas Central Railroad to go through Corsicana and was active in veterans' affairs with the Hood's Brigade Association. He died on November 10, 1886, and was buried in Ingram Cemetery near Rural Shade.

1551364944932.png


Capt. Ike Turner, Co. K, 5th Texas Infantry.
Isaac Newton Moreland "Ike" Turner was born in Putnam County, Georgia, April 3, 1839. His father, Joseph A. S. Turner, a veteran of the Texas Revolution, was a planter with Texas land holdings in Polk and Liberty counties. The Turner family moved to Texas just prior to the outbreak of the Civil War. In 1861, Ike helped to recruit and organize a mounted artillery company of 80 Polk County volunteers. Elected captain, he assembled his company at the county courthouse in Livingston on Sept. 3, 1861. Upon receiving the company flag from the ladies of Polk County, he waved his cap and told them he would send "each man back a hero." The company was later converted to infantry and would become Co. K of the 5th Texas Infantry.

At 22 years, Captain Turner was one of the youngest company commanders in Hood's Texas Brigade, though one of the best. He was known as a gifted "outpost officer," often taking command of the skirmish or picket line; he also temporarily assumed command of the regiment at both Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. It was said that Turner "was a brave and daring officer, quick to observe any advantage in position, prompt to take action thereunder...." He was breveted major with the idea that the rank would become permanent and Turner would organize and command a sharpshooter battalion in the Texas Brigade. However, on April 14, 1863, while the brigade was stationed at Fort Huger during the Suffolk Campaign, Turner stood atop the parapet and was, ironically, shot by a sharpshooter from across the James River. Mortally wounded, his last request to his men was, "Men, if you can, please take me home to my mother, for I fear she will worry so about me.", though he died the following day.

Captain Turner's brother, Charles, transported his body back to the family's former plantation, "Turnwold," near Eatonton, Georgia, for burial. Believing it was his last wish to be buried among his relatives, in 1995 his remains were finally disinterred, transported from Georgia to Texas and reburied in the family cemetery.

benjaminfcarter2.jpg

Lt. Col. Benjamin Franklin Carter, 4th Texas Infantry.
Mayor of Austin, Texas 1858-59. Benjamin Franklin Carter was born in 1831, in Maury County, Tennessee, and graduated from Jackson College, in Columbia, Tenn. He relocated to Texas and served as Mayor of Austin, and as an attorney before the war. On July 11, 1861, Carter was commissioned Captain of Company B "Tom Green Rifles" of the 4th Texas Infantry, being promoted to major on June 27, 1862, and lieutenant colonel on July 10, 1862. Lt. Col. Carter was mortally wounded by shell fragment in the face and legs as he attacked the western slope of Little Round Top at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. Carter died on July 21, but after much difficulty finding a local cemetery that would accept the Confederate officer's remains, Carter was finally interred in the cemetery of the Methodist Church in an unmarked grave.

col-philip-a-work-2-jpg.jpg

Lt. Col. Philip Alexander Work, 1st Texas Infantry.
Born in Cloverport, Kentucky, on February 17, 1832, Philip A. Work and his family moved to Velasco, Texas, in 1838 - several years later settling in Town Bluff, Tyler County. After receiving a good education, Philip Work was admitted to the bar in Woodville in 1853. In 1854 he enlisted and served with the rank of first sergeant for four months in Capt. John G. Walker's Co. B, Mounted Battalion of Texas Volunteers. Work was one of the two delegates from Tyler County to the Secession Convention in 1861, but before the convention reconvened on March 2 he resigned to raise a company of troops from Tyler County - the Woodville Rifles, later organized as Co. F of the 1st Texas Infantry.

By mid 1863, Work had been promoted to Major and later elected Lt. Colonel. After Col. Alexis T. Rainey was wounded at Gaines' Mill, Lt. Col. Work took command of the regiment. Thereafter, Work commanded the 1st Texas Infantry in the battles of Second Manassas, Boonesboro Gap, Sharpsburg/Antietam, and Gettysburg. He was one of the 40 (out of 226) in the regiment that made it out of the infamous Cornfield at Antietam unscathed. Also to note, his father, Dr. John Work, was assistant surgeon of the 1st Texas Infantry from October 1862 to July 1864. Work became ill on Sept. 18, 1863, before the battle of Chickamauga, and had no further field service with his regiment; his resignation as lieutenant colonel of the 1st Texas Infantry on Nov. 12, 1863, was accepted by the War Department in Jan. 1864.

He returned to Texas and, after recovering his health, raised and commanded a company in Col. David Smith Terry's Texas Cavalry regiment from the fall of 1864 to the end of the war. Work resumed his law practice in Woodville, but in October 1865 he moved to New Orleans, where he practiced law and entered the steamboat business. After 1874 he resided in Hardin County, Texas, where he attained eminence as a land lawyer. He also was the owner of the steamboat Tom Parker, which navigated the Neches River. In his later years Work wrote several accounts of his wartime experiences, but only fragments of these manuscripts have been preserved. At Woodville on May 8, 1855, he was married to Adeline F. Lea, and they were the parents of four children. Work died on March 17, 1911, and was buried in the old Hardin Cemetery near Kountze.

SIA2024.jpg

Sgt. George A. Branard, color-bearer of the 1st Texas Infantry.
Born on Galveston Island on January 5, 1843, Branard enlisted in Co. L, "Lone Star Rifles" of the 1st Texas Infantry. He was said to have been one of the bravest men in the regiment. At Gettysburg, Branard famously planted the First's colors at the summit of Houck's Ridge on July 2, 1863. After being wounded by a shell, he refused to pass on the flag until he fell unconscious and was carried to the rear by his comrades. He was wounded a second time in the Knoxville Campaign, losing his arm. Afterward, he was reassigned as sergeant in the ambulance corps, and remained in that position until the end of the war. He returned home to Texas, married and had ten children, and never missed a Texas Brigade reunion.
 

AndyHall

Colonel
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
BenjaminFCarter.jpg


Colonel Carter of the Fourth Texas died of his wounds after Gettysburg, after lingering for a long time. Three years ago there was an article in the North Texas Herald Democrat about the placement of a marker at his grave in Gettysburg. I started a post about that story, and Carter, but never finished it.

__________

In an interesting two-part story from the North Texas Herald Democrat, an officer of the 4th Texas Infantry killed at Little Round Top gets a grave marker in Pennsylvania:

[Lieutenant Colonel] Carter asked the doctor if there might be some gentleman in town to whom he could appeal for a Christian burial. When the doctor told McClure the story, McClure went to the hospital to visit Carter.

Within days Carter died and McClure asked that he be buried in the Presbyterian burial grounds. The request was unanimously denied by the church members. Every other church in town also refused to allow Carter to be buried in their cemeteries.

Finally, with help from a member of the Methodist Church, a burial plot was allowed in the Methodist Cemetery and Carter received a Christian burial there.

For 33 years Carter lay in that grave with a granite headstone until the cemetery was sold, along with the Methodist Church, to the Brethren congregation. When the church decided to enlarge its facilities, the only way it could build was into the burial grounds.

Forty-seven graves of people who had no one to claim their bones, including Carter's, were disinterred and taken to the Cedar Grove Cemetery and buried in a single grave with no head stone. It was said that Carter's stone probably was used as ballast when the concrete was poured for the new section of the church.​

Benjamin F. Carter was born in Tennessee in 1831. At the time of the 1850 census, eighteen-year-old Carter was teaching school in Giles County, Tennessee. After completing Jackson College, he relocated to Austin, where he worked as an attorney. He served a term two consecutive one-year terms as Austin's mayor in 1858 and 1859. In the 1860 census, he is listed as 29 years old, with a wife Louisa and two daughters, ages 1 and 3. He reported owning $2,000 worth of real estate, but did not report any personal property. He is not listed that year as a slaveholder.

With the coming of the war he organized a company called the Tom Green Rifles, that ultimately became Company B of the 4th Texas Infantry. Van C. Giles, a member of Carter's company, noted years later that the entire regiment was teeming with members of the bar:

Of the ten original captains who went to war in Virginia with the Fourth Texas regiment in 1861, six of them were lawyers, two merchants, one a farmer and one a stockman. Of the thirty lieutenants, nearly one-third were lawyers. Of the fifty sergeants, fifteen were lawyers, and of the 1500 men who served in that old regiment from the beginning to the finish, there was no end to lawyers and law students. Of course there were not enough offices in the regiment for all of them. Lawyers in war are like lawyers in peace, they go for all that's in sight. They held the best places in the army and they hold the best places in civil life. It's a mighty cold day when a lawyer gets left if chicken pie is on the bill of fare.​

Even among the lawyer-soldiers of the 4th Texas, though, Carter stood out:

Captain B. F. Carter of Company B was far above the average of men as you meet them. Intellectually, he had no superior in the regiments. A fine lawyer, a natural born soldier, he was a strict disciplinarian, but practical and just in all things. He possessed the gift of knowing how to explain every maneuver set down in Hardee's Tactics so thoroughly that the biggest blockhead in the ranks could understand them Physically he was not strong and the long marches used to weary him very much. On those occasions, to help him along, the boys would divide up his luggage, one taking his sword and belt, another his haversack and canteen another his blanket, and so forth. By this means we managed to keep him up. . . .

There was not an officer in Hood's Texas Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia who was more universally loved and admired by the soldiers of that old command than Lieutenant Colonel Ben F. Carter of the Fourth Texas Regiment, whom I have mentioned earlier.

He was the very soul of honor, full of the milk of human kindness, yet at times he appeared harsh and cruel, especially to those who did not know and understand him. . . .

After our arrival at Richmond [Virginia] in the summer of 1861, many of the men were sick from exposure and change in climate. They were sent to various hospitals in the city. Captain Carter would send someone every day to see how his boys were getting along, but would never go in person to see them. He would buy and send them little delicacies, and to some of the prodigal fellows who never had a cent he often sent money.He manifested the greatest interest in his men and nothing the quartermaster could issue was too good for old Company B -- but he strictly avoided coming in contact with the sick and wounded.

He often spoke of this peculiarity, or apparent indifference, explaining it by saying that he could not bear to see any one suffer, and that he had a perfect horror of a sick room.
Giles was writing long after the war, of course, so his profile of Carter undoubtedly includes a certain nostalgia, along with the knowledge that Carter did not survive the war. Nonetheless, it offers a vivid portrait of the man, and evinces affection and respect.

Part 2 of the article is here.
 
Last edited:

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
Colonel Carter of the Fourth Texas died of his wounds after Gettysburg. Three years ago there was an article in the North Texas Herald Democrat about the placement of a marker at his grave in Gettysburg. I started a post about that story, and Carter, but never finished it.

__________

In an interesting two-part story from the North Texas Herald Democrat, an officer of the 4th Texas Infantry killed at Little Round Top gets a grave marker in Pennsylvania:

[Lieutenant Colonel] Carter asked the doctor if there might be some gentleman in town to whom he could appeal for a Christian burial. When the doctor told McClure the story, McClure went to the hospital to visit Carter.​
Within days Carter died and McClure asked that he be buried in the Presbyterian burial grounds. The request was unanimously denied by the church members. Every other church in town also refused to allow Carter to be buried in their cemeteries.​
Finally, with help from a member of the Methodist Church, a burial plot was allowed in the Methodist Cemetery and Carter received a Christian burial there.​
For 33 years Carter lay in that grave with a granite headstone until the cemetery was sold, along with the Methodist Church, to the Brethren congregation. When the church decided to enlarge its facilities, the only way it could build was into the burial grounds.​
Forty-seven graves of people who had no one to claim their bones, including Carter's, were disinterred and taken to the Cedar Grove Cemetery and buried in a single grave with no head stone. It was said that Carter's stone probably was used as ballast when the concrete was poured for the new section of the church.​

Benjamin F. Carter was born in Tennessee in 1831. At the time of the 1850 census, eighteen-year-old Carter was teaching school in Giles County, Tennessee. After completing Jackson College, he relocated to Austin, where he worked as an attorney. He served a term two consecutive one-year terms as Austin's mayor in 1858 and 1859. In the 1860 census, he is listed as 29 years old, with a wife Louisa and two daughters, ages 1 and 3. He reported owning $2,000 worth of real estate, but did not report any personal property. He is not listed that year as a slaveholder.

With the coming of the war he organized a company called the Tom Green Rifles, that ultimately became Company B of the 4th Texas Infantry. Van C. Giles, a member of Carter's company, noted years later that the entire regiment was teeming with members of the bar:

Of the ten original captains who went to war in Virginia with the Fourth Texas regiment in 1861, six of them were lawyers, two merchants, one a farmer and one a stockman. Of the thirty lieutenants, nearly one-third were lawyers. Of the fifty sergeants, fifteen were lawyers, and of the 1500 men who served in that old regiment from the beginning to the finish, there was no end to lawyers and law students. Of course there were not enough offices in the regiment for all of them. Lawyers in war are like lawyers in peace, they go for all that's in sight. They held the best places in the army and they hold the best places in civil life. It's a mighty cold day when a lawyer gets left if chicken pie is on the bill of fare.​

Even among the lawyer-soldiers of the 4th Texas, though, Carter stood out:

Captain B. F. Carter of Company B was far above the average of men as you meet them. Intellectually, he had no superior in the regiments. A fine lawyer, a natural born soldier, he was a strict disciplinarian, but practical and just in all things. He possessed the gift of knowing how to explain every maneuver set down in Hardee's Tactics so thoroughly that the biggest blockhead in the ranks could understand them Physically he was not strong and the long marches used to weary him very much. On those occasions, to help him along, the boys would divide up his luggage, one taking his sword and belt, another his haversack and canteen another his blanket, and so forth. By this means we managed to keep him up. . . .​
There was not an officer in Hood's Texas Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia who was more universally loved and admired by the soldiers of that old command than Lieutenant Colonel Ben F. Carter of the Fourth Texas Regiment, whom I have mentioned earlier.​
He was the very soul of honor, full of the milk of human kindness, yet at times he appeared harsh and cruel, especially to those who did not know and understand him. . . .​
After our arrival at Richmond [Virginia] in the summer of 1861, many of the men were sick from exposure and change in climate. They were sent to various hospitals in the city. Captain Carter would send someone every day to see how his boys were getting along, but would never go in person to see them. He would buy and send them little delicacies, and to some of the prodigal fellows who never had a cent he often sent money.He manifested the greatest interest in his men and nothing the quartermaster could issue was too good for old Company B -- but he strictly avoided coming in contact with the sick and wounded.​
He often spoke of this peculiarity, or apparent indifference, explaining it by saying that he could not bear to see any one suffer, and that he had a perfect horror of a sick room.​
Giles was writing long after the war, of course, so his profile of Carter undoubtedly includes a certain nostalgia, along with the knowledge that Carter did not survive the war. Nonetheless, it offers a vivid portrait of the man, and evinces affection and respect.
Thanks! Here's his Find a Grave page:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24692107
 

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
A few photos of the 1st Texas Infantry, Hood's Texas Brigade in winter quarters near Dumfries, Virginia, during the winter of 1861-1862. Note how in late 1861 the 1st Texas Infantry was issued single-breasted frock coats with black cuffs, gray trousers with black seam stripes, and forage caps with brass letters designating their company and regiment.

Texas.soldier.3.jpg


478d3403fcb86d4ab169d0aaf9fae170.jpg


1st-Texas-Camp-Quantico-Rosenberg-Library-Collection.jpg
 
Last edited:

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
11392862_10152981008383301_507099596304194163_n-jpg.jpg

We can't leave out Joseph Benjamin (J. B.) Polley, Quarter Master Sergeant in the 4th Texas Infantry and later historian of the Texas Brigade, author of Hood's Texas Brigade: Its Marches, Its Battles, Its Achievements. The above is a postwar photo.

Polley was born near Bailey’s Prairie, Brazoria County, Texas, on October 27, 1840, the sixth of eleven children of Joseph Henry and Mary (Bailey) Polley. His family had historical Texas roots. His father Joseph Henry Polley a native of New York, first came to Texas with pioneer Moses Austin in 1819 and returned with Stephen F. Austin in 1821 as one of the Old Three Hundred colonists. In 1847 the Polley family moved to a farm on Cibolo Creek about thirty miles east of San Antonio.

In 1861 Polley graduated from Florence Wesleyan University at Florence, AL, and returned to Texas to enlist in Company F, Mustang Greys, of the 4th Texas Infantry. Sergeant Polley fought in many of the major battles the brigade was in. He received a head wound at the battle of Gaines Mills in 1862, and lost his right foot at the battle of Darbytown Road near Richmond on October 7, 1864.

After returning to Texas at the end of the war, he was admitted to the Texas bar in 1868 and established a law practice until 1876, when he moved to Floresville. In 1866 he married Mattie LeGette, and the couple had four children. Polley was elected commander of the Texas Division of the United Confederate Veterans, and he was also an active member and leader of Hood’s Texas Brigade Association. He would later author A Soldier’s Letters to Charming Nellie (1908) and Hood’s Texas Brigade: Its Marches, Its Battles, Its Achievements (1910). He also wrote articles for San Antonio Express and Confederate Veteran. Polley attended the yearly Hood’s Texas Brigade Association reunions up until shortly before his death. He died on February 2, 1918 in Floresville, Texas and is buried in the city cemetery.


powell-robt-micajah-1827-1916-(1862),-rer-collx.jpg

Col. Robert Micajah "Mike" Powell, 5th Texas Infantry

Robert Micajah "Mike" Powell, Confederate officer, was born on September 23, 1826, in Montgomery County, Alabama, to George Francis Powell and Nancy (Williamson) Powell. Powell moved to Brenham, Washington County, Texas, in 1849 and partnered with his uncle, R. M. "Three-Legged Willie" Williamson, in his legal practice. Powell married Elizabeth Green Wood (the daughter of wealthy planter Maj. Green Wood) on November 27, 1851. He purchased a 176-acre farm the following year, and the couple had one child before Elizabeth died in 1856. Powell represented Montgomery County in the Seventh Texas Legislature from 1857 to 1858, and in 1860 he had $21,700 in personal real estate.

Powell first served as captain of Company D of the Fifth Texas Infantry during the Civil War. Company D included men from Walker and Montgomery counties. He was promoted to major on August 22, 1862, and began to serve at the regimental headquarters. He rose quickly in the ranks and became lieutenant colonel on August 30, 1862, and then was promoted to colonel and began to command the Fifth Texas Infantry in November 1862. At Gettysburg he was wounded and captured on July 2, 1863. Union forces treated his wound and then imprisoned him at Johnson's Island Federal Prison, Sandusky, Ohio. On January 27, 1865, Powell was transferred to Fortress Monroe before being paroled a few days later on February 6. He returned to the Confederacy and took command of the Texas Brigade from Frederick S. Bass. Powell led the unit until its surrender at Appomattox on April 12, 1865.

By 1867 Powell had moved to Baltimore, Maryland, where he worked as a merchant and cotton broker. He had also remarried, in 1865 on his return to the Fifth Texas from prison, this time to Elizabeth Grace. The couple had a son and daughter. In 1882 Powell moved his family to St. Louis, Missouri, where he died on January 15, 1916, at eighty-nine years of age. He is buried at Cavalry Cemetery in that city.
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fpo73


Lt. Col. John C. Upton, 5th Texas Infantry.jpg

Lt. Col. John C. Upton, 5th Texas Infantry.

Here's his short bio in The Bloody Fifth by John Schmutz, p. 319-320:
"Upton, John Cunningham was born on a farm near Winchester in Franklin County, Tennessee, January 22, 1828, and attended the University of Lebanon. He farmed on the family estate until leaving Tennessee in 1850, first traveling to California to pan for gold. He remained there until 1859. While in California, his family moved to Texas. He arrived in Colorado County and took charge of his mother's plantation. In early 1861, Upton raised a company--later Company B--and was chosen as its captain. Promoted to major in fall of 1861, he became lieutenant colonel on July 17, 1862. Upton was noted for his informal dress--he often wore a red undershirt into battle--and for his unorthodox battle tactics. Upton's brother, William Felton Upton, joined Nichol's Regiment and served as a lieutenant colonel. John Upton was killed leading his men at Second Manassas. William returned to Texas in 1865, farmed the family plantation, and established a mercantile business in Schulenburg. He served several terms in the state legislature and died in Schulenburg on February 7, 1887. Upton County in West Texas is named in honor of these two brothers."

Like many officers in the Texas Brigade, Upton was quite a character. He's probably best known for going into battle at Gaines' Mill wielding a frying pan, and accepting an armful of swords from the polished officers of a New Jersey regiment that surrendered to his Texans.


captain-d-c-farmer-co-a-5th-texas-infantry-jpg.jpg

Capt. D. C. Farmer, Co. A "Bayou City Guards," 5th Texas Infantry.

D. C. Farmer, a twenty-five-year-old teacher, originally from Kentucky, enlisted in the Bayou City Guards in Houston on July 19, 1861, and was soon after elected third lieutenant. He was promoted to captain November 1, 1861, made acting major of the regiment on October 31, 1863, and acting lieutenant colonel in December of that year. Throughout his service Farmer was wounded at Gettysburg and again at the Wilderness; he was thereafter sent back to Texas in summer of 1864 on recruiting duty, where he remained for the duration of the war.


belcher-p-fuller-1-jpg.jpg

Lt. Belcher P. Fuller, Co. A "Bayou City Guards," 5th Texas Infantry.

"Fuller, Belcher Pugh was born April 13, 1836, in North Carolina, the son of Col. Nathan Fuller, a lineal descendant of John Rolfe. In 1843, his family moved to Houston, where Nathan became the city's twelfth mayor in 1853. B. Pugh Fuller . . . was a member of the Washington Light Guards prior to the war, as well as a practicing attorney. His sister, Matilda Jane Fuller Young, made the famous battle flag for the regiment and later became known as the "Mother" of Hood's Texas Brigade. Fuller enlisted with the Bayou City Guards on July 9, 1861, and was elected its third lieutenant that November. On September 1, 1863, he was promoted to first lieutenant. He was seriously wounded at the Wilderness on May 6, 1864. After the war, Fuller returned to his law practice. He died on March 12, 1876, and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Houston."
- The Bloody Fifth, p. 301


Sgt. Maj. John Marquis Smithers, Co. D, 5th Texas Infantry.jpg

Sgt. Maj. John Marquis "Mark" Smither in Co. D "Waverly Confederates," 5th Texas Infantry.

Smither was born in Walker County, Texas, on January 1, 1844. At only 17 he enlisted in Company D of the 5th Texas, and was later promoted to the rank of sergeant major when he turned 18. He served in nearly every major campaign with the Texas Brigade, was wounded at Chickamauga, and surrendered at Appomattox. After the war, Smither became a respected judge of Walker County Texas, and was elected Judge of the Twelfth Judicial District where he served for 12 years. He wrote many letters home throughout the war, which have served as a major source of information in histories of the Texas Brigade, as well as the recent history on the 5th Texas Infantry, The Bloody Fifth by John Schmutz. He died in Huntsville, Walker County, Texas, June 4, 1925.


pvt-james-j-smith-co-e-5th-texas-infantry-jpg.jpg

James J. Smith, Co. E "Dixie Blues," 5th Texas Infantry.

SMITH, J. J. - Prom., 2Cpl.: W. (arm), 2nd Manassas (Aug.30, 1862): Prom., Sgt.: W., Gettysburg (July 2, 1863): Disabled: Furloughed to Tex.


John Harrison Roberts, Co. E, 5th Texas Infantry 1.jpg

John Harrison Roberts, Co. E "Dixie Blues," 5th Texas Infantry.

Born May 1, 1845, in San Augustine, Texas. Died Feb. 23, 1934, in Galveston, Texas.

ROBERTS, JOHN J. - W. (both legs) & POW, Gettysburg (July 2, 1863): Exchanged: Dischgd. for wounds, June 1, 1864.


10525723_678599658888158_3581903855253819778_n-jpg.jpg

Max Cabaniss, Co. B, 5th Texas Infantry.
Died January 4, 1862, of disease while the Fifth Texas was in winter quarters near Dumfries, Virginia.


captain-elbert-s-jemison-co-g-1st-texas-infantry-jpg.jpg

Capt. Elbert S. Jemison, Co. G "Reagan Guards," 1st Texas Infantry.

Born May 30, 1835 in Talladega, Alabama. Died Feb. 1896 in Talladega, Alabama.

(1) JEMISON, ELBERT S. iLt. - W., Gaines' Mill (June 27, 1862): W., Antietam (Sept.17, 1862): Elect., Capt., Aug. 9, 1863: Detailed to recruiting serv., Trans-Miss. Dept., Spring, 1864: Resgnd., Aug. 9, 1864.


tumblr_ne0kulIVvW1rm9yhio1_1280.jpg

Private D.M. Walker of Navarro County, Texas, member of the "Corsicana Invincibles" that formed part of the "Marshall Guards," Co. E, 1st Texas Infantry. Discharged prior to Second Manassas for underage; chose to remain for the Second Manassas battle to fight with his friends and was killed in action.

william-h-gaston-1-jpg.jpg
robert-h-gaston-1-jpg.jpg

Brothers, Capt. William H. and 3rd Lt. Robert H. Gaston, Co. H "Texas Guards," 1st Texas Infantry.

Posted more on them here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/two-texas-brothers-at-antietam.143943/


Sgt. Albert Polk Brown and Pvt. Lycurgus McNeal Brown, Co. A, 4th Texas Infantry.jpg

Brothers, Sgt. Albert Polk Brown and Pvt. Lycurgus McNeal Brown, Co. A "Hardeman Rifles," 4th Texas Infantry. Lycyrgus died of disease December 27, 1861, in Dumfries, Va. Albert was wounded at Gaines' Mill and later died of his wounds on July 16, 1862.


6913968aa9d13a62034887f1214c71bf.jpg

Francis Logan Woodward, Co. B "Tom Green Rifles" of the 4th Texas Infantry; died in a Richmond Hospital of a spider bite, November 10, 1861.


pvt-william-r-smith-co-d-4th-texas-infantry-jpg.jpg

William R. Smith, Co. D "Guadalupe Rangers/Knights of Guadalupe County," 4th Texas Infantry.

SMITH, WM. R. - Prom., SSgt., Summer, 1862: W., Antietam (Sept. 17, 1862): K., Chickamauga (Sept.19, 1863).


capt-james-t-hunter-1-jpg.jpg

Postwar photo of Capt. James T. Hunter, Co. H "Porter Guards," 4th Texas Infantry.

James Thomas Hunter served in the 4th Texas Infantry through the entire Civil War. Starting as a lieutenant in 1861 and later becoming company commander as captain throughout some of the bloodiest battles of the war. He was among 11 remaining members of Company H when they surrendered with Lee’s Army at Appomattox.

He was born the son of George Elliott Hunter and his second wife Tamara Stevens, August 26, 1835 near Louisville, Kentucky. George Hunter and his family moved to Texas in 1837 and was a co-founder of the town of Cincinnati on the Trinity River in what is now Walker County. They built the first frame house, a two story hotel, the lumber being sawed by hand. This "Hunter's Tavern" was a cross point for stage coach and steamboat travelers. James Hunter was aboard the Steamboat “Fanner” in 1853 when it’s boiler exploded near Galveston, mortally wounding his father. James later gave an account of his father dying on the Trinity River aboard a steamer returning to Cincinnati and being placed in water tight box with a barrel of whiskey. As a young man, James had attained a reputation as a fighter and having several skirmishes with Indians in the area.

When Texas Seceded in 1861, Governor Edward Clark designated James T. Hunter to raise a company of volunteer infantry in Montgomery, Grimes and Walker counties. Hunter began his work in early May, and soon met P. P. Porter, a Mexican War veteran, who had also been recruiting in Montgomery County. The two sets of recruits were combined and went into camp at Prairie Plains on May 7, 1861. The future Co. H organized by electing Porter as captain and Hunter as first lieutenant. It was apparently also about this time that the company chose the name "Porter Guards." When called to duty, they traveled by train to Liberty, Texas and from their marched to through muddy swamps to New Orleans where they were loaded onto railcars and sent to Richmond, Virginia. In Richmond, September 30, 1861, the 4th Infantry was given to the Command of Colonel John Bell Hood and Brigaded with the 1st and 5th Texas Infantry to become “Hoods Texas Brigade”. Captain Porter of Company H, soon became the most efficient and popular officer in the regiment but that would end when he was killed at the battle of Gains Mill June 27, 1862. After Gains Mill, Lieutenant Hunter was promoted to Captain of Company H. A position that he would hold until the surrender at Appomattox in 1865.

After the war, J. T. Hunter returned to Walker County. He kept in touch with many of his fellow soldiers and worked to preserve the history of “Company H” all the way up to his death April 5, 1921. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Walker County, Texas.
http://www.granburystexasbrigade.org/gallery/heroes/officers/hunter_james.html


Franklin B. Chilton, Co. H, 4th Texas Infantry.jpg

Born in Marion, Alabama, Frank Bowden Chilton (1845-1926) was the son of Reverend Thomas and Louisa Chilton. In 1851, he moved with his family to Houston, Texas, relocating two years later to Montgomery, Texas. During the Civil War, Chilton enlisted in Hood’s Brigade, Company H of the 4th Texas Regiment in the Confederate Army. Although underage at the time of his enlistment, Chilton fought in many of the major battles with the brigade: Gaines' Mill, Second Manassass, Gettysburg, and Chickamauga.

Following the war, he passed the Texas State Bar and settled in Marlin, Texas. He became a leading member of Hood's Texas Brigade Association and published a great short book on the dedication of the Hood's Texas Brigade Monument on October 26-27, 1910. Speeches about the brigade, short biograhies of some of the soldiers, and history of the brigade are throughout the book.

f.b.chilton.png

Another image of F. B. Chilton, taken after the war.


JohnGregg.jpg

Another photo of Brig. Gen. John Gregg, last brigadier general of the Texas Brigade.
 
Last edited:

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
There are a number of folks here at CWT who have connections to Hood's Brigade, so this thread could go on a long, long time.
I certainly hope so :D

And thank you all for the replies and additional photos/information!
 
Last edited:

AndyHall

Colonel
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
I have discovered the name of the man on the far right of the photo with "Seven Pines" on it. I have given the information to a team of historians who are writing a book on the unit...........please stand by. I will say he is NOT a member of the Galveston company Mr. Hall.

Not sure why you mention me, as I have not said anything about the "Seven Pines" photo. However, that second photo was the subject of a nice bit of detective work published in 2011 in Civil War Times:

_________

company-l.jpg


The new issue of Civil War Times features a neat bit of detective work by Rick Eiserman, who discovered the likely photographer behind the famous images of the Texas Brigade in its winter quarters near Dumfries, Virginia, in the winter of 1861-62. Eiserman came upon the critical reference while doing more generalized research on the Texas Brigade, in the papers of two Galveston soldiers, William and Charles Schadt:

The Schadts wrote several letters from their Dumfries encampment at Camp Wigfall during 1861-62. I was halfway through an April 2, 1862, letter from William when the words seemed to jump off the page: “When we were in winter quarters Tom Blessing in our company had some dauguean [sic] fixings send [sic] to him and he went to work taking pictures in [sic] we have had a picture taken of the mess you can see it by calling on Mr. Waters or F. Hitchcock either of them will let you have one to take a copy of if you want it.”

My heart started racing as I read and reread that letter. After so many hours of searching specifically for the identity of the photographer, I’d found what I wanted when I wasn’t really anticipating it. The Dumfries photographer had actually been a soldier in the Texas Brigade. But who was this man who had obtained “dauguean fixings,” and how did he know what to do with them?

It turns out that Solomon Thomas “Tom” Blessing, who did indeed serve with William Schadt in Company L, was one of three brothers who worked as professional photographers before and after the war. Between the three of them, they owned or operated studios in New Orleans, Houston and Galveston. Clearly he had the knowledge and skills to take the photographs.​

This is good stuff, made better for me by the local connection of the photographer, and the archival source being the incomparable Galveston and Texas History Center at Rosenberg Library here. The Blessings were prolific photographers in the years after the war.
__________
 
Last edited:

CMWinkler

Colonel
Forum Host
Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 17, 2012
Location
Middle Tennessee
C M Winkler Colorized.jpg

My namesake, Captain Clinton McKamy Winkler, Co. I "Navarro Rifles," 4th Texas Infantry
Commanded Co. I, until promoted to Major after Gettysburg while recovering from wounds there in Richmond. Promoted to Lt. Colonel on April 27, 1864 and in Command of the 4th at Appomattox.

Val Giles describes him as the largest man in his company.
 

AndyHall

Colonel
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
KatieDaffan.jpg


There should be room for at least one woman in this thread, the only female member of the Hood's Texas Brigade Association. Katie Litty Daffan (1874-1951, eldest of Lawrence's six children), was an author, Superintendent of the Confederate Women's Home in Austin, three-time President of the Texas Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and Secretary of the Hood's Texas Brigade Association. She was a featured speaker and co-author at the dedication of the Hood's Texas Brigade Monument on the grounds of the State Capitol in Austin.

There is a story -- I think it's in Simpson's Hood's Texas Brigade in Reunion and Memory -- that at the final reunion of the association, Katie waited around in the meeting room in the hotel for the old veterans to arrive. None did; the handful who had traveled to the reunion were too feeble to come downstairs in the hotel to the meeting. Katie slowly, solemnly called the roll, pausing after each name to listen carefully for a response. There was none. When she reached the end of the roll, with no response, she formally adjourned the meeting and closed the books on the Hood's Texas Brigade Association.
 
Last edited:

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
I didn't mean to leave out any Georgians, South Carolinians, or Arkansans from this thread, since the 18th Georgia, Hampton's SC Legion, and the 3rd Arkansas were also part of the brigade. They lived through just as much as any Texan of the brigade and fought just as hard too.

Capt. James Lile Lemon 1.jpg

Capt. James L. Lemon, Co. A, 18th Georgia Infantry
More on him here: http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~allenatk/lemon.html

jarrett.jpg

Capt. D. L. Jarrett, Co. C, 18th Georgia Infantry
http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~allenatk/jarrett.html

5387396_1_l-jpg.jpg

Pvt. R. T. Gilbert, Co. D, 18th Georgia Infantry.
29 years old enlisted in May or June of 1861 in Doughtery County, Georgia
Wounded in the leg at Gettysburg Jul. 2, 1863. POW. Exchanged Nov. 12, 1863. Retired to Invalid Corps November 4, 1864, age 32.

Martin W. Gary.jpg

Martin W. Gary, who served as colonel in command of the Hampton Legion infantry from 1862 until promoted to brigadier general in 1864.

Thomas M. Logan 6.jpg

Thomas Muldrop Logan. Born in Charleston in 1840, he graduated from South Carolina College in 1860. He enlisted as a private in Company A "Washington Light Infantry" of the Hampton Legion, later appointed 2nd lieutenant and eventually making his way up to captain. Was wounded in the foot at Gaines' Mill and cited for bravery at Antietam. Promoted to lieutenant colonel in December 1862. After Col. Martin W. Gary rose to brigadier general in May 1864, Logan was promoted to colonel in command of the Hampton Legion. He only commanded the legion until late 1864 when he was offered and accepted command of Butler's cavalry brigade, promoted to brigadier general February 15, 1865. He went on to serve in the Carolinas Campaign and surrendered at Greensboro, NC.

Capt. Henry Julius Smith.jpg

Captain Henry Julius Smith, Company D "Gist Rifles," Hampton's Legion. He was mortally wounded at Antietam. After the battle, he was brought to the Shepherdstown home of Grandison T. Licklider, where he died on Sept. 21, 1862. After Smith’s death Licklider sent the officer’s sword, sash and other possessions to his widow.

Capt. Langdon Cheves McCord.jpg

Captain Langdon Cheves McCord, Co. H "South Carolina Zouave Volunteers" of Hampton's Legion.
Born on April 7, 1841 in Columbia, SC, he was elected captain in fall of 1861. The company didn't join the Legion til July 1862, and in their first major battle at Second Manassas Capt. McCord was "shot down at the head of his company, wounded in three places." He lingered in a hospital in Richmond until he succumbed to his wounds on January 23, 1863.

Richard J. Bailey.jpg

Some further info on his Find A Grave memorial:
"Richard Jesse Bailey was born in Virginia, I do not have a birth or death date for him, though I know he applied to the Arkansas Confederate Home in 1923, stating he was living in Garland County, AR. His parents were John William & Emmeline N. (Wood) Bailey. He served in Co. H of the 3rd AR Confederate Infantry, Hood's Old Brigade, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. He joined this unit on April 8th, 1862 at Richmond, Virginia. He was an excellent wood worker, who hand carved mementos throughout the war (including one taken from a tree outside Appomattox Courthouse, where he was when his unit surrendered). He survived the war, being one of the seven men left from the original unit. On July 11th, 1868, he joined the US Army as an engineer, serving until June 7th, 1871 when he was discharged. In 1915, he was living in the Confederate Home in Arkansas. On March 19th, 1918 he was admitted to the home for Disabled Ex-Confederate Soldiers in Richmond, Virginia. He was discharged April 13th, 1918. He was admitted again to the Confederate Home in Arkansas on September 4th, 1923. He died sometime after 1924, around age 78. He also lived in Texas for awhile, it seems."
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/...Sst=4&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=171639577&df=all&
 
Last edited:

Chattahooch33

Sergeant Major
Annual Winner
Joined
Oct 4, 2013
Location
Cobb's Legion Country - Bowdon, Ga.
Absolutely fantastic thread.

My family in the 1st Texas:
GGGG Uncle Sgt. James Wesley Blackwell of Co. D - Enlisted on June 6, 1861. Reported to be a scout for General John B. Hood. Wounded at the Battle of 2nd Mannassas on August 30th, 1862. Discharged for disability on October 10, 1862. Died in December of 1863.

GGGG Cousin Pvt. Harvey Pinson of Co. M - Enlisted May 5, 1862. Captured at Antietam on September 16, 1862. Exchanged at was present at Gettysburg and was later wounded at Chickamauga.
 

Chattahooch33

Sergeant Major
Annual Winner
Joined
Oct 4, 2013
Location
Cobb's Legion Country - Bowdon, Ga.
I didn't mean to leave out any Georgians, South Carolinians, or Arkansans from this thread, since the 18th Georgia, Hampton's SC Legion, and the 3rd Arkansas were also part of the brigade. They lived through just as much as any Texan of the brigade did and fought just as hard too. Not too many photos have turned up in my searches, these are the few I found:

lemon.jpg

Capt. James L. Lemon, Co. A, 18th Georgia Infantry
http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~allenatk/lemon.html

jarrett.jpg

D. L. Jarrett, Co. C, 18th Georgia Infantry
http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~allenatk/jarrett.html


Wow! Thank you for posting this also. The 18th Georgia, and the other five regiments that would make Wofford's Brigade, are by far my favorite. I had 4 family members in the 18th that I have no pictures of.

18th Ga:
1. Marmaduke S. SwannGGG Grandfather - 3rd Sergeant - 18th Georgia Infantry Co. E – Service Record: Enlisted June 11, 1861. Transferred to Company H, December 9, 1861. Wounded at 2nd Manassas, Virginia on August 30, 1862. Appointed 2nd Sergeant in 1864. Absent without leave January 31, 1865. Pension records show he was detailed in machine shops at Atlanta, Georgia, and surrendered at Kingston, Ga. May 12, 1865.

2. Joseph McEver – GGG Uncle (P,P) – Private - 18th Georgia Infantry Co. A – Enlisted on April 1, 1861. Next listed as absent without leave on Jan 30, 1865.

3. Nathan T. Wofford - Cousin 5x Removed (M,P) - 1st Lieutenant - 18th Georgia Infantry Co. K – Enlisted on June 13, 1861. Wounded at Seven Pines, Virginia on June 1, 1862. Elected 2nd Lieutenant on June 27, 1862 and 1st Lieutenant on August 29, 1862. Killed at Fredericksburg, Virginia on December 13, 1862.

4. William Benton Wofford- Cousin 5x Removed (M,P) - Private - 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharpshooters Co. A. - Transferred from 18th Georgia Infantry in 1863. The 3rd Georgia Sharpshooters were formed from the best men of the Georgia Brigade. They primarily served as the scouting/skirmishing unit for General William T. Wofford's division.
 

Nathanb1

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Retired Moderator
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Location
Smack dab in the heart of Texas
I didn't mean to leave out any Georgians, South Carolinians, or Arkansans from this thread, since the 18th Georgia, Hampton's SC Legion, and the 3rd Arkansas were also part of the brigade. They lived through just as much as any Texan of the brigade did and fought just as hard too. Not too many photos have turned up in my searches, these are the few I found:

lemon.jpg

Capt. James L. Lemon, Co. A, 18th Georgia Infantry
http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~allenatk/lemon.html

jarrett.jpg

D. L. Jarrett, Co. C, 18th Georgia Infantry
http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~allenatk/jarrett.html

One of James Lemon's descendants, Mark, is a well-known artist who has done some fantastic renditions of the Alamo and lives in James' original house in Acworth, Georgia. He's also just published a book on James and his experiences.

http://files.usgwarchives.net/ga/cobb/military/biolemon.txt

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/illustrated-alamo-1836-mark-lemon/1100433358

If you've been to the History Shop in San Antonio, you'll recognize the excellent model of the Alamo.
 

Similar threads

Top