Memphis to Nashville Line

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Apparently, the Dixie Flyer on the L&N, Chicago, St. Louis, Evansville, Nashville. Dixie Flyer on the NC&StL, Nashville, Chattanooga, Atlanta, Jacksonville, Miami. It did not pass through Memphis at all. The trains arriving from Memphis on the NC&St.L did not have a name. This is the arrival & departure board that is preserved in the Union Station Hotel in Nashville. I highly encourage a visit, it is quite a place.

The named passenger trains that passed through Memphis are listed as, Choctaw Rocket, Cherokee, Hot Springs Special, Memphis Californian & Southwest Express. It would appear that the Memphis-Nashville connection was local "coaches only," not a named express mainline service.

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<docshouth.unc.edu>imis>swaze>swaze>
If you are unaware of "Hill & Swayze's Confederate States Rail-road & Steam-boat Guide" you are in for a treat. It has the daily schedule for all the myriad short lines that ran in the South as well as steamboat service during the war. The descriptions of the hotels & other accommodations are worth a look all by themselves. This guide notes that the N&CRR only only runs as far north as Murfreesboro, Nashville being on the other side of the lines. An example of the complexity of Southern RR's is the Etowah Line that extended 4 miles from Allatoona GA to the Western & Atlantic RR. Trains ran daily to make connections with W&ARR trains.
 
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DaveBrt

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
Apparently, the Dixie Flyer on the L&N, Chicago, St. Louis, Evansville, Nashville. Dixie Flyer on the NC&StL, Chattanooga, Atlanta, Jacksonville, Miami. It did not pass through Memphis at all. The trains arriving from Memphis on the NC&St.L did not have a name. This is the arrival & departure board is preserved in the Union Station Hotel in Nashville. I highly encourage a visit, it is quite a place.

The named passenger trains that passed through Memphis are listed as, Choctaw Rocket, Cherokee, Hot Springs Special, Memphis Californian & Southwest Express. It would appear that the Memphis-Nashville connection was a local "coaches only," not a named express train line.

View attachment 410828

View attachment 410853

<docshouth.unc.edu>imis>swaze>swaze>
If you are unaware of "Hill & Swayze's Confederate States Rial-road & Steam-boat Guide" you are in for a treat. It has the daily schedule for all the myriad shorelines that ran in the South as well as steamboat service during the war. The descriptions of the hotels & other accommodations are worth a look all by themselves. This guide only runs as far north as Murfreesboro, Nashville being on the other side of the lines.
H&S was published several times during the war, with the schedules as provided by the railroads. The descriptions of the cities are here:

http://csa-railroads.com/Cities.htm
 

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
How did Hill and Swayze find the paper to put this out every month during the war? I can only assume it would be at least 25 pages, but would like to know it's volume at 75 cents on the confederate market, at least in 1862.
Lubliner.
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
How did Hill and Swayze find the paper to put this out every month during the war? I can only assume it would be at least 25 pages, but would like to know it's volume at 75 cents on the confederate market, at least in 1862.
Lubliner.
I have no idea. Of course, this volume has no trains in & out of Nashville. In time, there would not have been all that many connections to report on.

I find the short line schedules thought provoking. Sometimes we focus on the war so much that we forget that the vital civilian economy was literally chugging back & forth along those 40 mile lines. Steam engines of that era were maintenance hogs. No roller bearings, just bushings had to be replaced all the time. It would not take long to cripple an engine w/o routine service. How that must have disordered a local economy. It is another example of just how stupid it was to go to war w/o a thought about how the Southern economy really worked.

I really enjoy the restaurant reviews. Here in Murfreesboro there are traditional meat & three’s that are only open for breakfast & lunch ( dinner.)
 

DaveBrt

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
H&S was published several times during the war, with the schedules as provided by the railroads. The descriptions of the cities are here:

http://csa-railroads.com/Cities.htm
I have copies of the 90-page 1862 publication, the one from the UNC web site, saying it is published monthly (but with no month specified on this copy). I also have the April 1863 (85 pages), June 1863 (75 pages), October & November 1863 (74 pages) and June 1864 (56 pages). The schedules are only as good as the input received from the railroads. Of course, sending in changes was not high on most Superintendent's list of important tasks and the Trans-Mississippi schedules are missing after the first one.

If anyone knows of any other issues in existence, I would love to know the dates and where they are located.
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
I have copies of the 90-page 1862 publication, the one from the UNC web site, saying it is published monthly (but with no month specified on this copy). I also have the April 1863 (85 pages), June 1863 (75 pages), October & November 1863 (74 pages) and June 1864 (56 pages). The schedules are only as good as the input received from the railroads. Of course, sending in changes was not high on most Superintendent's list of important tasks and the Trans-Mississippi schedules are missing after the first one.

If anyone knows of any other issues in existence, I would love to know the dates and where they are located.
I went through my RR phase a while back. Never heard of a late war guide, probably for obvious reasons. The issue at UNC has always been a specimen under a bell jar for me. It shows just what was at stake as the CSA consumed diminishing assets & lost territory.
 
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TerryB

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Location
Nashville TN
Apparently, the Dixie Flyer on the L&N, Chicago, St. Louis, Evansville, Nashville. Dixie Flyer on the NC&StL, Nashville, Chattanooga, Atlanta, Jacksonville, Miami. It did not pass through Memphis at all. The trains arriving from Memphis on the NC&St.L did not have a name. This is the arrival & departure board that is preserved in the Union Station Hotel in Nashville. I highly encourage a visit, it is quite a place.

The named passenger trains that passed through Memphis are listed as, Choctaw Rocket, Cherokee, Hot Springs Special, Memphis Californian & Southwest Express. It would appear that the Memphis-Nashville connection was local "coaches only," not a named express mainline service.

View attachment 410828

View attachment 410853

<docshouth.unc.edu>imis>swaze>swaze>
If you are unaware of "Hill & Swayze's Confederate States Rail-road & Steam-boat Guide" you are in for a treat. It has the daily schedule for all the myriad short lines that ran in the South as well as steamboat service during the war. The descriptions of the hotels & other accommodations are worth a look all by themselves. This guide notes that the N&CRR only only runs as far north as Murfreesboro, Nashville being on the other side of the lines. An example of the complexity of Southern RR's is the Etowah Line that extended 4 miles from Allatoona GA to the Western & Atlantic RR. Trains ran daily to make connections with W&ARR trains.
I looked up a schedule at the Public Library downtown and saw a DF route to Memphis that made a 15 min stop in Jackson. I hope I'm right because it's crucial to a novel I just finished. She was capable of doing 70 mph at the time.
 
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