Restricted Memphis Mayor: Remove Lt. Gen. N. B. Forrest's body and monument from park

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Do you have a reference for this? (what a clown... Really?)

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Memphis Commercial Appeal, August 18, 2015 (available online with subscription)

"Council chairman Myron Lowery said the council’s next move is to determine whether it needs Historical Commission approval, and decide what to do with the statue. So far, one of the options he “kinda likes” is to put the statue up for auction online, he said."
 

diane

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:x3: And Sherman thought there would be peace in Tennessee AFTER Forrest died... I'm sure that auction will be a huge hit. Everybody wants a three ton equestrian statue in their back yard by the pool. Shoot, I'd take it if I could haul it - I've got a big ol' backyard and won't nobody be spray painting it anything without getting their pants full of buckshot... (I can just see Forrest standing in his stirrups and looking around with a scowl... "This ain't Tennessee!!")
 

Buckeye Bill

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:x3: And Sherman thought there would be peace in Tennessee AFTER Forrest died... I'm sure that auction will be a huge hit. Everybody wants a three ton equestrian statue in their back yard by the pool. Shoot, I'd take it if I could haul it - I've got a big ol' backyard and won't nobody be spray painting it anything without getting their pants full of buckshot... (I can just see Forrest standing in his stirrups and looking around with a scowl... "This ain't Tennessee!!")

Nothing sexier than a woman with a 12 gauge shotgun! :D
 

diane

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It seems to me that if he were telling the truth, he wouldn't blame it on his imaginary friend, because he wouldn't know he was imaginary.

Elvis told him. Tried to take away the spray can but Nixon was idling the '55 Caddie for another road trip...and he had a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich in his hand... About this time, Forrest is probably ready to get off his horse and put the wife in the back seat - "I'll drive, boys!" - and blow this Popsicle stand...
 

Desert Kid

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Elvis told him. Tried to take away the spray can but Nixon was idling the '55 Caddie for another road trip...and he had a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich in his hand... About this time, Forrest is probably ready to get off his horse and put the wife in the back seat - "I'll drive, boys!" - and blow this Popsicle stand...

Was Colonel Parker in the backseat?
 

diane

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I REALLY wonder what Forrest would have thought about cars. Motorcycles especially.

:D Well, he loved fine horses and he loved racing - sure he'd like fine cars and fast motorcycles! There's a story of a guy seeing a man galloping along a road at breakneck speed, apparently for no other reason than the fun of it. It was Forrest and his excellent race horse Roderick.
 

Desert Kid

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:D Well, he loved fine horses and he loved racing - sure he'd like fine cars and fast motorcycles! There's a story of a guy seeing a man galloping along a road at breakneck speed, apparently for no other reason than the fun of it. It was Forrest and his excellent race horse Roderick.

If only Forrest had lived to see NASCAR or the like.
 

GlenAlan Graham

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I don't think this line about keeping up the monuments because they're educational is going to win out now that more people are paying attention. I think taking down these monuments will make the history far less confusing for most Americans. The Lost Cause has always had obscuring the cause and meaning of the war as one of it's main objectives and these public commemorations are a significant part of the message.

These are to help us remember Jim Crow and segregation? But many of these monuments were put up very specifically by the champions and defenders of Jim Crow to remind blacks and "outside agitators" just who was in charge. Honoring Confederates in stone and bronze in our public places has long been part of the problem.

Your references to the Lost Cause and to "remember Jim Crow and segregation" are erroneous. The main objective of the Lost Cause was to attempt to explain why despite perseverance and tenacity the CSA ended up losing the War. It had no intention of "obscuring. . . the war". As for helping "us remember Jim Crow and segregation", that's really far-fetched.

The point of erecting Confederate monuments was to commemorate the bravery of Confederate soldiers and military leaders in their losing effort. For example, Nathan Bedford Forrest became famous for his leadership on the battlefield; he was called the "Wizard of the Saddle" and was studied and imitated by later military leaders. Thus the park in Memphis was named in his honor as a military leader and the equestrian statue erected therein to acknowledge his cavalry leadership.

When Forrest passed away in Memphis his funeral was attended by thousands, including Afro-Americans (most of them freedmen) who doubtless were aware of how Forrest had offered freedom to any slave that joined his cavalry and had addressed (by invitation) a gathering of an Afro-American organization that was ancestor to the NAACP. This last fact makes it all the more ironic that today's NAACP is in the forefront of the feeding frenzy to rename the three Confederate-named city parks and remove the General and Mrs. Forrest's remains and the equestrian statue from Forrest Park (which now has a bland and unwieldy name). But then the NAACP has evolved into one of the most racist groups in the USA.
 

5fish

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The man now offends large parts of the population. The statue and man are symbols of a era in which a sizeable part of the population oppressed and believe he does not need to be celebrated anymore and they are right. Nathan did not want to be in downtown so let honor his wishes and at the same time we would be honoring the wishes of the people of Memphis today.
 

Henry Whitworth

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Your references to the Lost Cause and to "remember Jim Crow and segregation" are erroneous. The main objective of the Lost Cause was to attempt to explain why despite perseverance and tenacity the CSA ended up losing the War. It had no intention of "obscuring. . . the war". As for helping "us remember Jim Crow and segregation", that's really far-fetched.

The point of erecting Confederate monuments was to commemorate the bravery of Confederate soldiers and military leaders in their losing effort. For example, Nathan Bedford Forrest became famous for his leadership on the battlefield; he was called the "Wizard of the Saddle" and was studied and imitated by later military leaders. Thus the park in Memphis was named in his honor as a military leader and the equestrian statue erected therein to acknowledge his cavalry leadership.

When Forrest passed away in Memphis his funeral was attended by thousands, including Afro-Americans (most of them freedmen) who doubtless were aware of how Forrest had offered freedom to any slave that joined his cavalry and had addressed (by invitation) a gathering of an Afro-American organization that was ancestor to the NAACP. This last fact makes it all the more ironic that today's NAACP is in the forefront of the feeding frenzy to rename the three Confederate-named city parks and remove the General and Mrs. Forrest's remains and the equestrian statue from Forrest Park (which now has a bland and unwieldy name). But then the NAACP has evolved into one of the most racist groups in the USA.

Your references to my references are erroneous. I didn't say their goal was "obscuring...the war." I said. "obscuring the cause and meaning of the war" It's a swell trick to just take out chunks of someone's sentences to change the meaning of what they say and then call them "erroneous." And "as for helping us remember Jim Crow and segregation" being far-fetched, that's exactly what I was saying. So you've knocked down a strawman that you created by erasing part of a sentence and then refuted something that I was refuting. Not an entirely convincing argument.
 
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virginiaworm

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Your references to the Lost Cause and to "remember Jim Crow and segregation" are erroneous. The main objective of the Lost Cause was to attempt to explain why despite perseverance and tenacity the CSA ended up losing the War. It had no intention of "obscuring. . . the war". As for helping "us remember Jim Crow and segregation", that's really far-fetched...


Suffice to say that I don't concur with your thoughts on the Lost Cause.
 
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