Memorial to Victims of Lynchings Finished: viewed for the first time on 60 Minutes, Sunday, April 8

Bee

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#1
Hanged, Burned, Shot, Drowned, Beaten
In a region where symbols of the Confederacy are ubiquitous, an unprecedented memorial takes shape.

On the corner of Washington and Decatur streets in Montgomery, Alabama, a visitor can feel history pressing in from every side. Just down the street is the church where Martin Luther King Jr. and others planned the Montgomery bus boycott. Two blocks away sits the First White House of the Confederacy, where Jefferson Davis once lived. But although the city is crowded with historical markers—including, by one count, 59 Confederate memorials, and a similar number devoted to the civil-rights movement—you won’t find many markers of the racial violence following Reconstruction.

Capture79.JPG

EJI (Rendering)

Soon, however, on a six-acre site overlooking Montgomery’s Cottage Hill neighborhood, just a stone’s throw from the Rosa Parks Museum, the Memorial to Peace and Justice [1] will serve as a national monument to the victims of lynchings. It will be the first such memorial in the U.S., and, its founders hope, it will show how lynchings of black people were essential to maintaining white power in the Jim Crow South. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazin...o-america-s-known-victims-of-lynching/540663/

New Memorial to be viewed for the first time on 60 Minutes, Sunday, April 8 at 7:00 p.m., ET/PT on CBS.


Oprah Winfrey gets first look inside memorial to the victims of lynching

The new memorial is dedicated to the thousands of victims of lynching that took place over a 70-year period following the Civil War

Oprah Winfrey brings 60 Minutes cameras into a new memorial dedicated to the thousands of victims of lynching that took place over a 70-year period following the Civil War. It will be the first time the public sees the inside of the structure and its 805 steel markers, each bearing the names of people murdered – often with thousands of onlookers amid a picnic-like atmosphere. Her report will be broadcast on 60 Minutes, Sunday, April 8 at 7:00 p.m., ET/PT on CBS.

Each marker represents a state county and contains the names of victims of documented lynching from that area. The memorial takes up six acres in the heart of Montgomery, Alabama, perhaps the best known city in the struggle for civil rights. Alabama was also the scene of 361 documented lynchings.

The efforts to build "The National Memorial for Peace and Justice" were led by Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer who founded the Equal Justice Initiative. Asked by Winfrey why he chose to commemorate lynching as opposed to other injustices done by white people to the Black Community, he says the murderous acts were a way for whites to maintain political control over African Americans, who were supposed to get the right to vote after the Civil War. "Lynching was especially effective because it would allow the whole community to know that we did this to this person… a message that if you try to vote, if you try to advocate for your rights… anything that complicates white supremacy…a nd political power, we will kill you." https://www.cbsnews.com/news/oprah-...-inside-memorial-to-the-victims-of-lynchings/
 

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Pat Young

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#3
Hanged, Burned, Shot, Drowned, Beaten
In a region where symbols of the Confederacy are ubiquitous, an unprecedented memorial takes shape.

On the corner of Washington and Decatur streets in Montgomery, Alabama, a visitor can feel history pressing in from every side. Just down the street is the church where Martin Luther King Jr. and others planned the Montgomery bus boycott. Two blocks away sits the First White House of the Confederacy, where Jefferson Davis once lived. But although the city is crowded with historical markers—including, by one count, 59 Confederate memorials, and a similar number devoted to the civil-rights movement—you won’t find many markers of the racial violence following Reconstruction.

View attachment 183225
EJI (Rendering)

Soon, however, on a six-acre site overlooking Montgomery’s Cottage Hill neighborhood, just a stone’s throw from the Rosa Parks Museum, the Memorial to Peace and Justice [1] will serve as a national monument to the victims of lynchings. It will be the first such memorial in the U.S., and, its founders hope, it will show how lynchings of black people were essential to maintaining white power in the Jim Crow South. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazin...o-america-s-known-victims-of-lynching/540663/

New Memorial to be viewed for the first time on 60 Minutes, Sunday, April 8 at 7:00 p.m., ET/PT on CBS.


Oprah Winfrey gets first look inside memorial to the victims of lynching

The new memorial is dedicated to the thousands of victims of lynching that took place over a 70-year period following the Civil War

Oprah Winfrey brings 60 Minutes cameras into a new memorial dedicated to the thousands of victims of lynching that took place over a 70-year period following the Civil War. It will be the first time the public sees the inside of the structure and its 805 steel markers, each bearing the names of people murdered – often with thousands of onlookers amid a picnic-like atmosphere. Her report will be broadcast on 60 Minutes, Sunday, April 8 at 7:00 p.m., ET/PT on CBS.

Each marker represents a state county and contains the names of victims of documented lynching from that area. The memorial takes up six acres in the heart of Montgomery, Alabama, perhaps the best known city in the struggle for civil rights. Alabama was also the scene of 361 documented lynchings.

The efforts to build "The National Memorial for Peace and Justice" were led by Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer who founded the Equal Justice Initiative. Asked by Winfrey why he chose to commemorate lynching as opposed to other injustices done by white people to the Black Community, he says the murderous acts were a way for whites to maintain political control over African Americans, who were supposed to get the right to vote after the Civil War. "Lynching was especially effective because it would allow the whole community to know that we did this to this person… a message that if you try to vote, if you try to advocate for your rights… anything that complicates white supremacy…a nd political power, we will kill you." https://www.cbsnews.com/news/oprah-...-inside-memorial-to-the-victims-of-lynchings/
Did not see that. Thank for the link to the clip.
 
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#4
This is the stuff that created bad choices between effective law enforcement, partial vindication of Civil Rights and an all out race war, with a 20th century type of result.
 
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#5
As horrible as that was, I see that over 1/3 of the Lynchings were Whites.

Also see that about 25 non-Confederate states were also guilty of Black Lynchings.

In all fairness, I'm just wondering if both of the above were also mentioned in the report.

http://www.famous-trials.com/sheriffshipp/1083-lynchingsstate

I would had like to see that myself last night. I had it on, but missed that segment somehow.
 

Yulie

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#6
Bee,

I watched 60 Minutes with judgmental eyes having studied and knowing the history of lynching. I was again horrified at the depictions shown. I think it was important that CBS decided to show them. I often wonder what became of the people who were smiling participants at these lynchings. Overall, I'm glad that this post Civil War tragedy is being preserved and memorialized as it will allow people to reflect on what happened and continues to happen with mass incarcerations. The healing process can only begin by admitting that this took place.
 
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#7
I am ashamed to note that even Nebraska was a participant in the lynching history of the nation:

http://www.omaha.com/eedition/sunri...cle_9bf510b0-ba48-5664-95a9-60eb8beed866.html

....as witnessed by a young Henry Fonda from a second-story window across the street!

Unfortunately, the KKK had some semblance of power in Nebraska during that era, and we had a "Klavan" in the city where I used to teach and coach before retirement. Somewhere in my "archives" I have a few old KKK letterheads that were discovered in the tearing down of an old residential garage not many blocks from the local high school and college campus.

J
 



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