"Meade at Gettysburg: a Study in Command", Kent Masterson Brown, 2021.

dahenry

Private
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
I can't imagine that this title has not been posted on before as it was published in June of this year, but haven't been able to locate a thread that does so. Also didn't know which forum to post it under, considered the "Gettysburg" forum, but finally decided on this one. I have read the author's "Retreat from Gettysburg" and thoroughly enjoyed it.
Here is a review from "Civil War Books and Authors": https://cwba.blogspot.com/2021/09/review-meade-at-gettysburg-study-in.html
There are also other reviews and video interviews with the author on line. Has anyone read it?

Dave
 

Belfoured

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
I can't imagine that this title has not been posted on before as it was published in June of this year, but haven't been able to locate a thread that does so. Also didn't know which forum to post it under, considered the "Gettysburg" forum, but finally decided on this one. I have read the author's "Retreat from Gettysburg" and thoroughly enjoyed it.
Here is a review from "Civil War Books and Authors": https://cwba.blogspot.com/2021/09/review-meade-at-gettysburg-study-in.html
There are also other reviews and video interviews with the author on line. Has anyone read it?

Dave
Drew's reviews are generally excellent - and the most detailed around.
 

speedylee

Corporal
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
I read Meade at Gettysburg: A Study in Command. I was disappointed with the writing. Some of Brown's sentences are extraordinarily long. I counted one that had more than 180 words (I stopped counting at 180). Sentences like that are exhausting to read. Parts of this book read like a legal brief.

But having said that, the research is terrific. Because the focus was narrowly about the AoP, Brown was able to go into depth on important issues that confronted Meade. The discoordination of the Union army's first day at Gettysburg gets a long look, as do Sickles' actions on the second day. I was gratified to read an extended discussion of the Circular and Meade's decisions as the AoNV headed home. Meade's issues with supplies are detailed better in this book than any other I have read about Gettysburg.

I was anxious to read this book. I am glad I bought it. I wish it had been edited differently.
 

dahenry

Private
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
I was anxious to read this book. I am glad I bought it. I wish it had been edited differently.
Thank you, your overall endorsement leads me to think that Brown has uncovered some new factors that need to be included in any conversation of Meade's performance at Gettysburg, I'll definitely buy the book.

edit: I forgot to add this video discussion between the author and Peter Carmichael of The Civil War Institute -
 
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dahenry

Private
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Thank you, your overall endorsement leads me to think that Brown has uncovered some new factors that need to be included in any conversation of Meade's performance at Gettysburg, I'll definitely buy the book.

edit: I forgot to add this video discussion between the author and Peter Carmichael of The Civil War Institute -
 

IDIC

Cadet
Joined
Jul 21, 2013
Location
UK
I have read and enjoyed this book. After reading it Meade has increased his reputation in my estimation. The amount he achieved within 3 days of being given control of the AOTP, bearing in mind that he didn’t know where half of his army was, is quite amazing. The logistical side of his efforts in supplying his army so quickly with the essential equipment and sustenance to fight a 3 day battle is also worthy of praise. I know that Meade has his critics but I would throughly recommend this to students of Gettysburg, the AOTP and Meade.
 

Belfoured

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
No one said he was.
I'm just clarifying that Brown doesn't suggest that the position should have been occupied by Sickles. And Drew's review really doesn't suggest that Brown gives it positive marks, if you read his review carefully: "Brown shares the position of those who maintain that the move was both inadvisable and a clear act of insubordination." He simply states that Sickles has "defenders in the matter", but - correctly - he doesn't include Brown among them.
 

MichaelWinicki

Private
Joined
Jul 23, 2020
I'm just clarifying that Brown doesn't suggest that the position should have been occupied by Sickles. And Drew's review really doesn't suggest that Brown gives it positive marks, if you read his review carefully: "Brown shares the position of those who maintain that the move was both inadvisable and a clear act of insubordination." He simply states that Sickles has "defenders in the matter", but - correctly - he doesn't include Brown among them.
That's fair enough.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Location
Memphis
I read Meade at Gettysburg: A Study in Command. I was disappointed with the writing. Some of Brown's sentences are extraordinarily long. I counted one that had more than 180 words (I stopped counting at 180). Sentences like that are exhausting to read. Parts of this book read like a legal brief.

But having said that, the research is terrific. Because the focus was narrowly about the AoP, Brown was able to go into depth on important issues that confronted Meade. The discoordination of the Union army's first day at Gettysburg gets a long look, as do Sickles' actions on the second day. I was gratified to read an extended discussion of the Circular and Meade's decisions as the AoNV headed home. Meade's issues with supplies are detailed better in this book than any other I have read about Gettysburg.

I was anxious to read this book. I am glad I bought it. I wish it had been edited differently.
I have not read it yet- when you say his sentences are too long, are you referring to word count alone (just kept on writing) or are the sentences overly academic?
Thanks
 

dlofting

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 13, 2013
Location
Vancouver, BC, Canada
Just finished this book. It's definitely worth reading.

The author is pro Meade, but he is objective in his analysis, for the most part. His research is thorough with a lot of primary sources.

I came away with a good understanding of how Meade saw and executed his role as an army commander, which is, in my opinion, one of the author's aims in writing the book.
 
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