Discussion May have no place on the site but:

IslayMalt

Private
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Location
Waynesboro, PA
I see a lot of pics on social media of current african american's in Confederate uniforms carrying the Stars and Bars. The actual location or scenario of the images are vague. I've come across some who say over 100k died fighting for the Confederacy. When I doubted them, all I received was a 'prove it'. I know it's not true. Camp help yes. Soldiers, as far as I know, none. Maybe in some strange circumstance, I don't know. Just curious if wearing the uniform is even accurate in current images.
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
Just curious if wearing the uniform is even accurate in current images.

There are period photos of black men in Confederate uniforms, along with far more accounts than photos. And there were plenty of black men who wore uniforms to Confederate reunions decades after the war.

Slaves in uniform:
9Blyfew.jpg

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Soldiers:

Jordan Noble, 1st Louisiana Native Guard
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Charles Lutz, Company F, Eighth Louisiana Infantry Regiment
9SMrdTQ.jpg


Older men at reunions:

Daniel Winsett
7H6kVcz.png
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
I see a lot of pics on social media of current african american's in Confederate uniforms carrying the Stars and Bars. The actual location or scenario of the images are vague. I've come across some who say over 100k died fighting for the Confederacy. When I doubted them, all I received was a 'prove it'. I know it's not true. Camp help yes. Soldiers, as far as I know, none. Maybe in some strange circumstance, I don't know. Just curious if wearing the uniform is even accurate in current images.
There are many photos of camp slaves wearing some sort of confederate uniform. As you say, they're virtually all "camp help."
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
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Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
I've come across some who say over 100k died fighting for the Confederacy.
That would be the approximate number of whites that died in battle.

*

It would not be a stretch to say that 100-300 free blacks and slaves (enlisted or not) fought in every major battle on the Confederate side. Number killed in battle? 500? 1000? Whatever the number, it's comparable to the 3,000 USCT killed in battle on the Union side.
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
That would be the approximate number of whites that died in battle.

*

It would not be a stretch to say that 100-300 free blacks and slaves (enlisted or not) fought in every major battle on the Confederate side. Number killed in battle? 500? 1000? Whatever the number, it's comparable to the 3,000 USCT killed in battle on the Union side.

I really dislike these threads. They tend to devolve into unpleasant exchanges that do not have to take place. I can never ascertain the reason there is such a push to come up with this stuff, either. I'm sorry but please source that?
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
I really dislike these threads. They tend to devolve into unpleasant exchanges that do not have to take place. I can never ascertain the reason there is such a push to come up with this stuff, either. I'm sorry but please source that?
"It would not be a stretch to say" - It's a guesstimate based on numerous sources. Many are in these threads-

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/bl...se-what-the-newspapers-said-1861-1865.129911/
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/bl...ederate-cause-the-post-war-newspapers.165002/
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/co...vice-records-of-black-and-mulatto-men.142783/
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
I'm not being argumentative but threads sourced back to here kinda don't convince me. It's a good place but this specific argument has numerous threads. Your claim that there were black troops in every battle- 100 to 300, fighting for the Confederacy, isn't something I've seen verified through eye witness accounts anywhere. Randolph Johnson, a black Gettysburg civilian, ' poured hot lead ' into Confederate troops in July, 1863 but there were no USCT troops there, either.

I'm back with why did the Confederate government continue to argue this point, and only kind-sorta agree to it ( then have it over-turned ), around March, 1865, if there were already black troops in the field? How was that possible? Who would have countermanded orders from their own government? This is Feb. 1865.

bc 1865.jpg
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
I'm not being argumentative but threads sourced back to here kinda don't convince me. It's a good place but this specific argument has numerous threads. Your claim that there were black troops in every battle- 100 to 300, fighting for the Confederacy...
Here's my statement at post #6-
"It would not be a stretch to say that 100-300 free blacks and slaves (enlisted or not) fought in every major battle on the Confederate side."
 
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JD Mayo

Retired User
Joined
Jun 12, 2020
Location
Greensboro NC
There are many photos of camp slaves wearing some sort of confederate uniform. As you say, they're virtually all "camp help."

That's what you call Temster's I think with them with weapons in their hands was there propaganda against the Union. My guess anyways. They wouldn't let them walk around camp on their side with those weapons.
 

JD Mayo

Retired User
Joined
Jun 12, 2020
Location
Greensboro NC
I'm not being argumentative but threads sourced back to here kinda don't convince me. It's a good place but this specific argument has numerous threads. Your claim that there were black troops in every battle- 100 to 300, fighting for the Confederacy, isn't something I've seen verified through eye witness accounts anywhere. Randolph Johnson, a black Gettysburg civilian, ' poured hot lead ' into Confederate troops in July, 1863 but there were no USCT troops there, either.

I'm back with why did the Confederate government continue to argue this point, and only kind-sorta agree to it ( then have it over-turned ), around March, 1865, if there were already black troops in the field? How was that possible? Who would have countermanded orders from their own government? This is Feb. 1865.

View attachment 367869

It would have to pass in the Confederate Goverment I don't think it ever did?
 

Mango Hill

Corporal
Joined
Jul 23, 2020
This comes from the report of Lewis H. Steiner https://archive.org/details/reportlewissteiner00steirich/page/19/mode/1up

"Wednesday, September 10. - At four o'clock this morning the rebel army began to move from our town, Jackson's force taking the advance. The movement continued until eight o'clock p.m., occupying sixteen hours. The most liberal calculations could not give them more than 64,000 men. Over 3,000 negroes must be included in this number. These were clad in all kinds of uniforms, not only in cast-off or captured United States uniforms, but in coats with Southern buttons, State buttons, etc. These were shabby, but not shabbier or seedier than those worn by white men in the rebel ranks. Most of the negroes had arms, rifles, muskets, sabres, bowie-knives, dirks, etc. They were supplied, in many instances, with knapsacks, haversacks, canteens, etc., and were manifestly an integral portion of the Southern Confederacy Army. They were seen riding on horses and mules, driving wagons, riding on caissons, in ambulances, with the staff of Generals, and promiscuously mixed up with all the rebel horde. The fact was patent, and rather interesting when considered with the horror rebels express at the suggestion of black soldiers being employed for the National defense....Their apologies for regimental bands were vile and excruciating. The only real music in their column to-day was from a bugle blown by a negro. Drummers and fifers of the same color abounded in their ranks."
 
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