Martha Hodes Wins Gilder Lehrman 2016 Lincoln Prize for Book "Mourning Lincoln"

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Martha Hodes has been announced as the winner of the 2016 Lincoln Prize. From the announcement:

The 2016 Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize will be awarded to Martha Hodes, Professor of History at New York University, for her book Mourning Lincoln, published in 2015 by Yale University Press.

The book is a culmination of years of research focusing on the personal reactions of Americans across regional, racial, economic, and political lines to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

The Prize is awarded by Gettysburg College and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. Hodes’s book was chosen from 132 submissions and five finalists as the 2016 recipient. Hodes will receive $50,000 and a bronze replica of Augustus Saint-Gaudens' life-size bust “Lincoln the Man” in a ceremony on April 21 in New York City.
 

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I glad to say I have read this book. I found a lot that was new and unfamiliar in it for me. Like many of my generation, I was taught that Lincoln was almost universally mourned after he was assassinated. That was hardly the case, as Hodes shows. John Wilkes Booth was hardly without admirers.
 

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The press release gives some info on the jury that selected the books nominated for the prize as well as the selection process and the reasons Hodes's book won:

Gilder Lehrman Institute President James G. Basker is one of the six Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize Board members who decided this year’s winner. In addition to Richard Gilder and Lewis Lehrman, principals of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in New York and co-creators of the Gilder Lehrman Collection, other board members include Gettysburg College President Janet Morgan Riggs, and Trustees Emeritus David LeVan and H. Scott Higgins.

Hodes and the other finalists were recommended to the board by a three-person jury, which consisted of Harold Holzer, Jonathan F. Fanton Director of The Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College in New York City; James Oakes, Distinguished Professor of History and Graduate School Humanities Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; and Susannah Ural, Charles W. Moorman Distinguished Alumni Professor of the Humanities and co-director of the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society in the history department at the University of Southern Mississippi. The jury read a total of 132 books submitted for the 2016 Prize.

In their report to the board, Holzer, Oakes, and Ural wrote, “Mourning Lincoln is a stunning and enlightening work that underscores the rage that Lincoln’s assassination fueled, the outpouring of grief that resulted, and how the anger and confusion that boiled across the country that summer influenced the failures of Reconstruction.”

The thoughtful scholarship that the jury commended is one of the many aspects of the work that Riggs was quick to recognize, as well.

“Gettysburg College is once again honored to partner with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in recognizing a truly extraordinary piece of scholarship,” said Riggs. “Mourning Lincoln provides an intimate portrait of the immediate reactions of blacks and whites, northerners and southerners, to Lincoln’s assassination—reactions that ranged from grief to delight. Martha Hodes weaves together her thorough research into a fascinating read that illuminates this tumultuous time in America’s history.”

Likewise, Basker appreciates how Hodes’s narrative brings to life a defining moment in our nation’s history.

“It is books like Mourning Lincoln that make colossal historic events seem real, give them a human dimension with which we can all connect,” said Basker. “Professor Hodes writes beautifully, the many stories she tells are by turns illuminating, touching, and shocking, and the overall impact of her book is very powerful. It is a compelling read for specialists and general readers alike."

In the end, though, Hodes stresses that what readers can take away from her book extends beyond the immediate reaction to a national tragedy.

“Personal responses to Lincoln’s assassination tell a larger story about American history,” Hodes said. “The assassination provoked responses that were deeply intertwined with irreconcilable visions. Black freedom, the fate of former Confederates, and the future of the nation were at stake for all Americans, whether they grieved or rejoiced when they heard the news. Because the meaning of the Civil War remains unresolved, we continue to ponder Lincoln’s legacies into the 21st century.”
 
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The press release gives some info on the jury that selected the books nominated for the prize as well as the selection process and the reasons Hodes's book won:

Gilder Lehrman Institute President James G. Basker is one of the six Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize Board members who decided this year’s winner. In addition to Richard Gilder and Lewis Lehrman, principals of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in New York and co-creators of the Gilder Lehrman Collection, other board members include Gettysburg College President Janet Morgan Riggs, and Trustees Emeritus David LeVan and H. Scott Higgins.

Hodes and the other finalists were recommended to the board by a three-person jury, which consisted of Harold Holzer, Jonathan F. Fanton Director of The Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College in New York City; James Oakes, Distinguished Professor of History and Graduate School Humanities Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; and Susannah Ural, Charles W. Moorman Distinguished Alumni Professor of the Humanities and co-director of the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society in the history department at the University of Southern Mississippi. The jury read a total of 132 books submitted for the 2016 Prize.

In their report to the board, Holzer, Oakes, and Ural wrote, “Mourning Lincoln is a stunning and enlightening work that underscores the rage that Lincoln’s assassination fueled, the outpouring of grief that resulted, and how the anger and confusion that boiled across the country that summer influenced the failures of Reconstruction.”

The thoughtful scholarship that the jury commended is one of the many aspects of the work that Riggs was quick to recognize, as well.

“Gettysburg College is once again honored to partner with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in recognizing a truly extraordinary piece of scholarship,” said Riggs. “Mourning Lincoln provides an intimate portrait of the immediate reactions of blacks and whites, northerners and southerners, to Lincoln’s assassination—reactions that ranged from grief to delight. Martha Hodes weaves together her thorough research into a fascinating read that illuminates this tumultuous time in America’s history.”

Likewise, Basker appreciates how Hodes’s narrative brings to life a defining moment in our nation’s history.

“It is books like Mourning Lincoln that make colossal historic events seem real, give them a human dimension with which we can all connect,” said Basker. “Professor Hodes writes beautifully, the many stories she tells are by turns illuminating, touching, and shocking, and the overall impact of her book is very powerful. It is a compelling read for specialists and general readers alike."

In the end, though, Hodes stresses that what readers can take away from her book extends beyond the immediate reaction to a national tragedy.

“Personal responses to Lincoln’s assassination tell a larger story about American history,” Hodes said. “The assassination provoked responses that were deeply intertwined with irreconcilable visions. Black freedom, the fate of former Confederates, and the future of the nation were at stake for all Americans, whether they grieved or rejoiced when they heard the news. Because the meaning of the Civil War remains unresolved, we continue to ponder Lincoln’s legacies into the 21st century.”
 

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Here are the other books nominated for the Lincoln Prize:

In addition to citing Hodes’s book, the jury recommended six additional finalists, whose books will also be acknowledged at the April 21 Lincoln Prize award dinner. They are: Michael Anderegg for Lincoln and Shakespeare (University of Kansas Press0; Eric Foner for Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad (W. W. Norton); Richard Wightman Fox for Lincoln’s Body: A Cultural History (W. W. Norton); Earl J. Hess for Civil War Infantry Tactics: Training, Command, and Small-Unit Effectiveness (LSU Press); Jonathan D. Sarna and Benjamin Shapell for Lincoln and the Jews (St. Martin’s); NS John Stauffer, Zoe Trodd, and Celeste-Marie Bernier for Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century’s Most Photographed American (W. W. Norton).
 

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I read four of the nominated books. Here are my thoughts:
1. Eric Foner for Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad This was a fascinating examination of a recently uncovered primary source documenting Underground Railroad operations in New York.
2. Richard Wightman Fox for Lincoln’s Body: A Cultural History There have been several books on the Lincoln Funeral Train and many books that at least discuss the funerals and burials of Lincoln. This one seems to be the definitive version. I read this and Hodes back to back which was a bit grim.
 
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3. Jonathan D. Sarna and Benjamin Shapell for Lincoln and the Jews This is a collection of reproduction of documents relating to Lincoln's relationships with Jews. It was published in conjunction with the exhibit of the same name at the New-York Historical Society.
4. Earl J. Hess for Civil War Infantry Tactics: Training, Command, and Small-Unit Effectiveness This traces American military tactics from the American Revolution through the Civil War. The search for simple tactics that could be used by amateur officers to move civilians in uniform is a dominant theme.
 

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Past Winners and Finalists:

2015
First Place:

Harold Holzer, Lincoln and the Power of the Press: The War for Public Opinion

Finalists:
William Blair – With Malice Toward Some: Treason and Loyalty in the Civil War Era
Richard Brookhiser – Founders’ Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln
James B. Conroy – Our One Common Country: Abraham Lincoln and the Hampton Roads Peace Conference of 1865
Joshua Zeitz – Lincoln’s Boys: John Hay, John Nicolay, and the War for Lincoln’s Image

2014
First Place:

Allen C. Guelzo, Gettysburg: The Last Invasion
Martin P. Johnson, Writing the Gettysburg Address

Special Achievement Award:
Steven Spielberg, "Lincoln"

Finalists:
Christopher Hager, Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing
Margaret Humphreys, Marrow of Tragedy: The Health Crisis of the American Civil War
Robert E. May, Slavery, Race, and Conquest in the Tropics: Lincoln, Douglas, and the Future of Latin America
John Stauffer and Benjamin Soskis, The Battle Hymn of the Republic: A Biography of the Song That Marches On

2013
First Place
:
James Oakes, Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States,1861-1865

Finalists:
Stephen Kantrowitz, More Than Freedom: Fighting for Black Citizenship in a White Republic, 1829-1889
Yael A. Sternhell, Routes of War: The World of Movement in the Confederate South

2012
First Place:
William C. Harris, Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union and Elizabeth D. Leonard,Lincoln’s Forgotten Ally: Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt of Kentucky.
Honorable Mention:
Barbara A. Gannon, The Won Cause: Black and White Comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic

2011
First Place:
Eric Foner, The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery.
Honorable Mention: Robert Bray, Reading with Lincoln. Lorien Foote, The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Violence, Honor and Manhood in the Union Army. Mark W. Geiger, Financial Fraud and the Guerilla Violence in Missouri's Civil War, 1861-1865 Stanley Harrold, Border War: Fighting Over Slavery Before the Civil War. Kate Masur, An Example of All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle over Equality in Washington D.C.Howard Jones, Blue and Gray Diplomacy: A History of Union and Confederate Foreign Relations.

2010
First Place:
Michael Burlingame, Abraham Lincoln: A Life.
Finalists: Robert McGlone, John Brown's War Against Slavery. Mark Wahlgren Summers, A Dangerous Stir: Fear, Paranoia, and the Making of Reconstruction.

2009
First Place:
James McPherson, Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief and Craig Symonds,Lincoln and His Admirals: Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Navy, and the Civil War
Honorable Mention: Jacqueline Jones, Saving Savannah: The City and the Civil War. Fred Kaplan, Lincoln: The Biography of a Writer and William Lee Miller, President Lincoln: The Duty of a Statesman.

2008
First Place:
James Oakes, The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics (W. W. Norton)
Elizabeth Brown Pryor, Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through His Private Letters (Viking)
Finalist: Robert Cooke, Troubled Commemoration: The American Civil War Centennial, 1961-1965
Honorable Mention: Chandra Manning, What This Cruel War Was Over: Soldiers, Slavery, and the Civil War(Alfred A. Knopf)

2007
First Place:
Douglas L. Wilson, Lincoln's Sword: The Presidency and the Power of Words (Vintage)
Finalists: Martha Hodes, The Sea Captain's Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century (W. W. Norton); Harry S. Stout, Upon the Alter of the Nation: A Moral History of the Civil War (Viking Adult).

2006
First Place:
Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (Simon & Schuster)
Finalists: Ronald White, The Eloquent President: A Portrait of Lincoln Through his Words,Steven Woodworth,Nothing But Victory: The Army of Tennessee 1961-1865, Sean Wilentz, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln
Honorable Mentions: Carol Bundy, The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-1864 (Farrar, Straus & Giroux); Margaret Creighton, The Colors of Courage: Gettysburg's Forgotten History - Immigrants, Women, and African Americans in the Civil War's Defining Battle (Basic Books); and Richard F. Miller, Harvard's Civil War: A History of the Twentieth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (University Press of New England).

2005
First Place:
Allen C. Guelzo, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation (Simon & Schuster)
Second Place: Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President(Simon & Schuster)
Finalists: Jonathan D. Martin, Divided Mastery: Slave Hiring in the American South (Harvard University Press); Jane A. Schultz, Women at the Front: Hospital Workers in Civil War America (University of North Carolina Press).

2004
First Place:
Richard J. Carwardine, Lincoln (Pearson Education Ltd.)
Special Achievement Award: John Y. Simon for editing 26 volumes--to date--of The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant (Southern Illinois University Press)
Finalist: Steven Hahn, A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration (Belknap Press/Harvard University Press)

2003
First Place:
George C. Rable, Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg! (University of North Carolina Press)
Second Place: John Stauffer, The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race(Harvard University Press)
Honorable Mention: Michael Fitzgerald, Urban Emancipation: Popular Politics in Reconstruction Mobile, 1860-1890 (Louisiana State University Press)
E-Lincoln Prize: John Adler for HarpWeek Presents Lincoln and the Civil War.com (website)

2002
First Place:
David Blight, Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, (Harvard University Press).Honorable Mention: Alice Fahs, The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North & South, 1861-1865(University of North Carolina Press)
Honorable Mention: Kenneth J. Winkle, The Young Eagle: The Rise of Abraham Lincoln (Taylor Trade Publishing, Dallas).

2001
First Place:
Russell F. Weigley, A Great Civil War: A Military and Political History, 1861-1865 (Indiana University Press).
Second Place:
Leonard L. Richards, The Slave Power: The Free North and Southern Domination, 1780-1860(Louisiana State University Press).
Finalist: Mark L. Bradley, This Astounding Close Road to Bennett Place, (University of North Carolina Press)
E-Lincoln Prize Winner: Edward L. Ayers, Anne S. Rubin, and William G. Thomas for Valley of the Shadow: The Eve of War (CD-ROM)
Second Place: Stephen Railton for Uncle Tom's Cabin and American Culture (web site).

2000 First Place: John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger, Runaway Slaves: Rebels in the Plantation (Oxford University Press) and Allen C. Guelzo, Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.).
Second Place: Michael Holt, The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War (Oxford University Press).
Lifetime Achievement Award: Richard N. Current, University Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

1999
First Place: Douglas L. Wilson, Honor's Voice: The Transformation of Abraham Lincoln (Alfred A. Knopf).
Second Place: J. Tracy Power, Lee's Miserables: Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, from the Wilderness to Appomattox (Univ. of North Carolina Press).

1998
First Place: Jim McPherson, For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War (Oxford University Press)
Second Place: William C. Harris, With Charity For All: Lincoln and the Restoration of the Union (University Press of Kentucky)
Honorable Mention: Gary Gallagher, The Confederate War: How Popular Will, Nationalism, and Military Strategy Could Not Stave off Defeat (Harvard University Press).
Honorable Mention: James Robertson, Jr., Stonewall Jackson: The Man, the Soldier, the Legend (MacMillan Publishing Co).

1997
First Place: Don Fehrenbacher, Lifetime Achievement with special recognition of Prelude to Greatness: Lincoln in the 1850s and The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics (Stanford University Press).

1996
First Place: David Donald, Lincoln (Touchstone Books).
Second Place: Mark Grimsley, The Hard Hand of War: Union Military Policy Toward Southern Civilians 1861-1865 (Cambridge University Press).
Finalist: Michael Fellman, Citizen Sherman: A Life of William Tecumseh Sherman (Random House).

1995
First Place: Phillip Shaw Paludan, The Presidency of Abraham Lincoln (University Press of Kansas).
Second Place: William Marvel, Andersonville: The Last Depot (University of North Carolina Press).
Finalist: Charles B. Dew, Bond of Iron: Master and Slave at Buffalo Forge (W.W. Norton & Company).

1994
First Place: (co-winners) Ira Berlin, Barbara Fields, Steven Miller, Joseph Reidy, Leslie Rowland, eds., Free at Last: A Documentary History of Slavery, Freedom, and the Civil War (New Press).
Second Place: Reid Mitchell, The Vacant Chair: The Northern Soldier Leaves Home (Oxford University Press).
Finalist: Winthrop D. Jordan, Tumult and Silence at Second Creek: An Inquiry into a Civil War Slave Conspiracy(Louisiana State University Press).
Finalist: John Evangelist Walsh, The Shadows Rise: Abraham Lincoln and the Anne Rutledge Legend(University of Illinois Press).

1993
First Place: Kenneth Stampp, Lifetime Achievement with special recognition of The Peculiar Institution (Vintage Books).
Second Place: Albert Castel, Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864 (University Press of Kansas).
Finalist: John F. Marszalek, Sherman: A Soldier's Passion for Order (Vintage Books).
Finalist: Craig L. Symonds Joseph E. Johnston, A Civil War Biography (W.W. Norton & Company).

1992
First Place (split equally): William S. McFeely, Frederick Douglass (W.W. Norton & Company) and Charles Royster, The Destructive War: William Tecumseh Sherman, Stonewall Jackson, and the Americans (Vintage Books).
Finalist: Ira Berlin, et al., Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation 1861-1867: Series I, Volume III, The Wartime Genesis of Free Labor: The Lower South (New Press)

1991
First Place: Ken Burns, The Civil War (Howell Press)
Finalist: Mark E. Neely, Jr., The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties (Oxford University Press).
Finalist: Warren Wilkinson, Mother May You Never See The Sights I Have Seen: The Fifty-Seventh Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers in the Last Year of the Civil War (HarperCollins).
 
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More about Martha Hodes:

Martha Hodes is Professor of History at New York University. She is the author of two previous prizewinning books, The Sea Captain’s Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century and White Women, Black Men: Illicit Sex in the NineteenthCentury South. Hodes has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Charles Warren Center at Harvard, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the Whiting Foundation. Hodes has been interviewed by, or written for, media outlets including The New York Times, WHYY’s “Radio Times,” WOR’s “The Joey Reynolds Show,” and more. In 2011, she was elected to the Society of American Historians. She lives in New York City and Swarthmore, PA.
 

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Past Winners and Finalists:

2015
First Place:

Harold Holzer, Lincoln and the Power of the Press: The War for Public Opinion

Finalists:
William Blair – With Malice Toward Some: Treason and Loyalty in the Civil War Era
Richard Brookhiser – Founders’ Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln
James B. Conroy – Our One Common Country: Abraham Lincoln and the Hampton Roads Peace Conference of 1865
Joshua Zeitz – Lincoln’s Boys: John Hay, John Nicolay, and the War for Lincoln’s Image

2014
First Place:

Allen C. Guelzo, Gettysburg: The Last Invasion
Martin P. Johnson, Writing the Gettysburg Address

Special Achievement Award:
Steven Spielberg, "Lincoln"

Finalists:
Christopher Hager, Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing
Margaret Humphreys, Marrow of Tragedy: The Health Crisis of the American Civil War
Robert E. May, Slavery, Race, and Conquest in the Tropics: Lincoln, Douglas, and the Future of Latin America
John Stauffer and Benjamin Soskis, The Battle Hymn of the Republic: A Biography of the Song That Marches On

2013
First Place
:
James Oakes, Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States,1861-1865

Finalists:
Stephen Kantrowitz, More Than Freedom: Fighting for Black Citizenship in a White Republic, 1829-1889
Yael A. Sternhell, Routes of War: The World of Movement in the Confederate South

2012
First Place:
William C. Harris, Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union and Elizabeth D. Leonard,Lincoln’s Forgotten Ally: Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt of Kentucky.
Honorable Mention:
Barbara A. Gannon, The Won Cause: Black and White Comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic

2011
First Place:
Eric Foner, The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery.
Honorable Mention: Robert Bray, Reading with Lincoln. Lorien Foote, The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Violence, Honor and Manhood in the Union Army. Mark W. Geiger, Financial Fraud and the Guerilla Violence in Missouri's Civil War, 1861-1865 Stanley Harrold, Border War: Fighting Over Slavery Before the Civil War. Kate Masur, An Example of All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle over Equality in Washington D.C.Howard Jones, Blue and Gray Diplomacy: A History of Union and Confederate Foreign Relations.

2010
First Place:
Michael Burlingame, Abraham Lincoln: A Life.
Finalists: Robert McGlone, John Brown's War Against Slavery. Mark Wahlgren Summers, A Dangerous Stir: Fear, Paranoia, and the Making of Reconstruction.

2009
First Place:
James McPherson, Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief and Craig Symonds,Lincoln and His Admirals: Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Navy, and the Civil War
Honorable Mention: Jacqueline Jones, Saving Savannah: The City and the Civil War. Fred Kaplan, Lincoln: The Biography of a Writer and William Lee Miller, President Lincoln: The Duty of a Statesman.

2008
First Place:
James Oakes, The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics (W. W. Norton)
Elizabeth Brown Pryor, Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through His Private Letters (Viking)
Finalist: Robert Cooke, Troubled Commemoration: The American Civil War Centennial, 1961-1965
Honorable Mention: Chandra Manning, What This Cruel War Was Over: Soldiers, Slavery, and the Civil War(Alfred A. Knopf)

2007
First Place:
Douglas L. Wilson, Lincoln's Sword: The Presidency and the Power of Words (Vintage)
Finalists: Martha Hodes, The Sea Captain's Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century (W. W. Norton); Harry S. Stout, Upon the Alter of the Nation: A Moral History of the Civil War (Viking Adult).

2006
First Place:
Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (Simon & Schuster)
Finalists: Ronald White, The Eloquent President: A Portrait of Lincoln Through his Words,Steven Woodworth,Nothing But Victory: The Army of Tennessee 1961-1865, Sean Wilentz, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln
Honorable Mentions: Carol Bundy, The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-1864 (Farrar, Straus & Giroux); Margaret Creighton, The Colors of Courage: Gettysburg's Forgotten History - Immigrants, Women, and African Americans in the Civil War's Defining Battle (Basic Books); and Richard F. Miller, Harvard's Civil War: A History of the Twentieth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (University Press of New England).

2005
First Place:
Allen C. Guelzo, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation (Simon & Schuster)
Second Place: Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President(Simon & Schuster)
Finalists: Jonathan D. Martin, Divided Mastery: Slave Hiring in the American South (Harvard University Press); Jane A. Schultz, Women at the Front: Hospital Workers in Civil War America (University of North Carolina Press).

2004
First Place:
Richard J. Carwardine, Lincoln (Pearson Education Ltd.)
Special Achievement Award: John Y. Simon for editing 26 volumes--to date--of The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant (Southern Illinois University Press)
Finalist: Steven Hahn, A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration (Belknap Press/Harvard University Press)

2003
First Place:
George C. Rable, Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg! (University of North Carolina Press)
Second Place: John Stauffer, The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race(Harvard University Press)
Honorable Mention: Michael Fitzgerald, Urban Emancipation: Popular Politics in Reconstruction Mobile, 1860-1890 (Louisiana State University Press)
E-Lincoln Prize: John Adler for HarpWeek Presents Lincoln and the Civil War.com (website)

2002
First Place:
David Blight, Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, (Harvard University Press).Honorable Mention: Alice Fahs, The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North & South, 1861-1865(University of North Carolina Press)
Honorable Mention: Kenneth J. Winkle, The Young Eagle: The Rise of Abraham Lincoln (Taylor Trade Publishing, Dallas).

2001
First Place:
Russell F. Weigley, A Great Civil War: A Military and Political History, 1861-1865 (Indiana University Press).
Second Place: Leonard L. Richards, The Slave Power: The Free North and Southern Domination, 1780-1860(Louisiana State University Press).
Finalist: Mark L. Bradley, This Astounding Close Road to Bennett Place, (University of North Carolina Press)
E-Lincoln Prize Winner: Edward L. Ayers, Anne S. Rubin, and William G. Thomas for Valley of the Shadow: The Eve of War (CD-ROM)
Second Place: Stephen Railton for Uncle Tom's Cabin and American Culture (web site).

2000 First Place: John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger, Runaway Slaves: Rebels in the Plantation (Oxford University Press) and Allen C. Guelzo, Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.).
Second Place: Michael Holt, The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War (Oxford University Press).
Lifetime Achievement Award: Richard N. Current, University Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

1999
First Place:
Douglas L. Wilson, Honor's Voice: The Transformation of Abraham Lincoln (Alfred A. Knopf).
Second Place: J. Tracy Power, Lee's Miserables: Life in the Army of Northern Virginia, from the Wilderness to Appomattox (Univ. of North Carolina Press).

1998
First Place:
Jim McPherson, For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War (Oxford University Press)
Second Place: William C. Harris, With Charity For All: Lincoln and the Restoration of the Union (University Press of Kentucky)
Honorable Mention: Gary Gallagher, The Confederate War: How Popular Will, Nationalism, and Military Strategy Could Not Stave off Defeat (Harvard University Press).
Honorable Mention: James Robertson, Jr., Stonewall Jackson: The Man, the Soldier, the Legend (MacMillan Publishing Co).

1997
First Place:
Don Fehrenbacher, Lifetime Achievement with special recognition of Prelude to Greatness: Lincoln in the 1850s and The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics (Stanford University Press).

1996
First Place:
David Donald, Lincoln (Touchstone Books).
Second Place: Mark Grimsley, The Hard Hand of War: Union Military Policy Toward Southern Civilians 1861-1865 (Cambridge University Press).
Finalist: Michael Fellman, Citizen Sherman: A Life of William Tecumseh Sherman (Random House).

1995
First Place:
Phillip Shaw Paludan, The Presidency of Abraham Lincoln (University Press of Kansas).
Second Place: William Marvel, Andersonville: The Last Depot (University of North Carolina Press).
Finalist: Charles B. Dew, Bond of Iron: Master and Slave at Buffalo Forge (W.W. Norton & Company).

1994
First Place:
(co-winners) Ira Berlin, Barbara Fields, Steven Miller, Joseph Reidy, Leslie Rowland, eds., Free at Last: A Documentary History of Slavery, Freedom, and the Civil War (New Press).
Second Place: Reid Mitchell, The Vacant Chair: The Northern Soldier Leaves Home (Oxford University Press).
Finalist: Winthrop D. Jordan, Tumult and Silence at Second Creek: An Inquiry into a Civil War Slave Conspiracy(Louisiana State University Press).
Finalist: John Evangelist Walsh, The Shadows Rise: Abraham Lincoln and the Anne Rutledge Legend(University of Illinois Press).

1993
First Place:
Kenneth Stampp, Lifetime Achievement with special recognition of The Peculiar Institution (Vintage Books).
Second Place: Albert Castel, Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864 (University Press of Kansas).
Finalist: John F. Marszalek, Sherman: A Soldier's Passion for Order (Vintage Books).
Finalist: Craig L. Symonds Joseph E. Johnston, A Civil War Biography (W.W. Norton & Company).

1992
First Place
(split equally): William S. McFeely, Frederick Douglass (W.W. Norton & Company) and Charles Royster, The Destructive War: William Tecumseh Sherman, Stonewall Jackson, and the Americans (Vintage Books).
Finalist: Ira Berlin, et al., Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation 1861-1867: Series I, Volume III, The Wartime Genesis of Free Labor: The Lower South (New Press)

1991
First Place:
Ken Burns, The Civil War (Howell Press)
Finalist: Mark E. Neely, Jr., The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties (Oxford University Press).
Finalist: Warren Wilkinson, Mother May You Never See The Sights I Have Seen: The Fifty-Seventh Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers in the Last Year of the Civil War (HarperCollins).
As a book list junkie, special thanks for this list, Mr. Young. @Bee may be interested in this.
 
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Pat Young

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White Women, Black Men: Illicit Sex in the NineteenthCentury South sounds interesting. When I brought up a related subject a while back, I got a bit of a tanning. I will be interested to see what Hodes has to say.
 
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Bee

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White Women, Black Men: Illicit Sex in the NineteenthCentury South sounds interesting. When I brought up a related subject a while back, I got a bit of a tanning. I will be interested to see what Hodes has to say.
I, uh, was going to say something about the title piquing my interest....but, it did not translate in a dignified manner so I kept it in the bubble over my head :smile:
 

chellers

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I, uh, was going to say something about the title piquing my interest....but, it did not translate in a dignified manner so I kept it in the bubble over my head :smile:
Bee, you have a bubble over you head?!! Cool, where can I find one? Never mind, I know the bubble fairies left it on your pillow one magical evening. I've maxed out the space in my brain and could use the extra space. :biggrin:
 
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