Martha Ellen Young Truman (mother of president Harry S. Truman)

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#1
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"Mrs.Truman never forgot the burning, looting and thorough destruction of western Missouri by Union forces. After the War, when her son, Harry Truman was invited to dinner by a prominent family in Kansas City, a family who had profited handsomely by the war, Mrs. Truman made the following remark: “When you go there, turn the silverware over and check the hallmark, it’s probably ours!

Martha Ellen Young was born in Jackson County, Missouri, on November 25, 1852, to Solomon Young, a successful farmer who also had a business running Conestoga wagon trains along the Overland Trail, and his wife Harriet Louisa Gregg. The family were Southern loyalists during the War and several relatives served in the Confederate Army.

In later life, Martha told of how a band of Union-supporting Jayhawkers destroyed her family's farm one day in 1861, then came again in 1863 when the family was ordered to vacate their home within 15 days by General Ewing’s General Order 11 and forced to move to Platte County, Missouri until after the war. This harsh treatment left Martha with a lifelong resentment for the winning Union side in the war, and she was well-known for her Confederate sympathies, so much so, that it was reported that when she first visited the White House in 1945, she refused to sleep in the Lincoln Bedroom."
 

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donna

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#2
I just read about her last week. It took her awhile to come to White House. I read also that she wouldn't sleep in the Lincoln bedroom. Don't know if that just a story or truth.
 
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I'm in the wrong state--I was told so.
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She sure was pretty! Interesting story. I frequently wonder how I would respond if in ladies like her's shoes. It's so easy, 150+ years later to think, "Well, I would have been easier to get along with and shouldn't have harbored grudges" but is that realistic? I doubt it. Just thinking about being forced from home with enemy soldiers about starts rankling me and puts my Scots-Irish blood up.

@7th Mississippi Infantry That is an interesting story, no matter who it belongs to.
 

Patrick H

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#8
Was Mrs. Truman the lady that wouldn't let her son into the party because he was wearing his U.S Army "Dress Blue" uniform during the World War One era, or am I thinking of another famous American officer's Mother ?
That was Harry's grandmother, I believe. Harry had been to a Sunday afternoon National Guard meeting and was wearing his blue uniform. He then went to visit his grandmother, who nearly fell out when she saw him. When she recovered, she told him: "Never wear that color in this house again."
 
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#9
That was Harry's grandmother, I believe. Harry had been to a Sunday afternoon National Guard meeting and was wearing his blue uniform. He then went to visit his grandmother, who nearly fell out when she saw him. When she recovered, she told him: "Never wear that color in this house again."
@Patrick H,Thanks !

I thought it was a Harry Truman story.
 

Booner

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#13
Mr. Truman attended several of their reunions.
http://www.rulen.com/partisan/truman.htm
As did Harry.

Oops. I thought you said Mrs. Truman.
As far as politions attending the Quantrill reunions, several did, and gave speeches too. You know, trying to turn out the vote.

I'm sure the politicians were democrats, as I doubt republicans would have been welcomed.
 
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