Manassas National Battlefield

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Buckeye Bill

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Bill,
You know how much I always enjoy your photo tours. You don't just show me the locales, you actually manage to evoke a sense of being there in each of your photos. Pretty darned good, I say!

Pat
You are so kind, Pat!

I am looking into a possible opportunity to work for the National Park Service.

I would love to be hired by the NPS and seek a full time position after I retire in the Spring of 2019.

Bill
 

Buckeye Bill

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The First Battle of Bull Run (Battle of Manassas Junction) was fought on July 21, 1861 not far from Washington, D.C. It was the first major battle of the American Civil War. Federal forces were slow in positioning themselves, allowing Confederate reinforcements time to arrive by trains. Each side had about 18,000 poorly trained and poorly led troops in their first battle. It was a Confederate victory followed by a disorganized retreat of Federal forces to Washington, D.C.
 
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In Robert Paul Jordan's National Geographic book The Civil War he has the following interaction with the then superintendant of the Manassas National Battlefield Francis F. Wilshin. As Mr. Wilshin conducted author Jordan over the battlefield he took him to a lot close by the visitor center.

Quoting from page 57.

"And what happened to those who died at Bull Run, I asked. We walked into a silent woodland just south of the park's Visitor Center. Leaves rustled underfoot: the setting sun limned the trees and loaned strange substance to their shadows: a rabbit scampered through the forest litter. "There," spoke my companion. A small mound stood above the woodland floor, brown earth smoothly rounded and laced with leaves. "And there. And there". Several of them. Many.

After the battle of Bull Run, people from Manassas and Warrenton and all around came looking for the bodies of their sons, searching far into the night by lantern light. No one claimed these men. Few people today know they rest there. No one remembers their names.

"Let them lie in peace where their comrades buried them," said Mr. Wilshin. "This is a special kind of hallowed ground."


s-l300.jpg


Just thought I would share this passage about 1st Bull Run/Manassas and ask the question. Has anyone or does anyone know if these soldiers are buried there yet today?
 
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Cavalry Charger

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In Robert Paul Jordan's National Geographic book The Civil War he has the following interaction with the then superintendant of the Manassas National Battlefield Francis F. Wilshin. As Mr. Wilshin conducted author Jordan over the battlefield he took him to a lot close by the visitor center.

Quoting from page 57.

"And what happened to those who died at Bull Run, I asked. We walked into a silent woodland just south of the park's Visitor Center. Leaves rustled underfoot: the setting sun limned the trees and loaned strange substance to their shadows: a rabbit scampered through the forest litter. "There," spoke my companion. A small mound stood above the woodland floor, brown earth smoothly rounded and laced with leaves. "And there. And there". Several of them. Many.

After the battle of Bull Run, people from Manassas and Warrenton and all around came looking for the bodies of their sons, searching far into the night by lantern light. No one claimed these men. Few people today know they rest there. No one remembers their names.

"Let them lie in peace where their comrades buried them," said Mr. Wilshin. "This is a special kind of hallowed ground."


View attachment 149955

Just thought I would share this passage about 1st Bull Run/Manassas and ask the question. Has anyone or does anyone know if these soldiers are buried there yet today?
Exactly a year to the day from this post, I'm wondering about those who died here, and how many there were. From what I have read this area became a Confederate stronghold for a time after this battle, and bodies were not able to be retrieved, though it does seem they were buried. Is there any type of official cemetery here, or were most of the bodies retrieved and moved to official sites?
 
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mofederal

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I enjoyed visiting this park, but I was much more interested in the Second Bull Run sites. The Brawner Farm site and others parts of that battle. I did see the First Bull Run Battlefield as I was there. I was into the Second battle and I still am. I love these photos, and I do remember the traffic. I thought cars drove pretty fast through the area.
 

JPChurch

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Thanks, Civil War Trust!

Thanks for that link!! It shows the exact position of the 11th Mass. Infantry during the peak of the battle on Henry Hill. One of my distant relatives was Colonel in command of the 11th, the "Boston Volunteers." George Clark Jr. was severely wounded that afternoon and was successfully carted off the field and made it back with the skedaddle to Wash D.C. His wounds prevented him from further military service and he returned to Boston and took part in the War Relief Society for the rest of the War. This pic attached of Clark was probably taken in one of Brady's studios prior to First Manassas, either in New York City or Washington DC
img001 (3).jpg
 
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Buckeye Bill

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I enjoyed visiting this park, but I was much more interested in the Second Bull Run sites. The Brawner Farm site and others parts of that battle. I did see the First Bull Run Battlefield as I was there. I was into the Second battle and I still am. I love these photos, and I do remember the traffic. I thought cars drove pretty fast through the area.
I wasn't able to complete a full tour of this battlefield in 2011. When I return, I will definitely hit the Second Battle of Bull Run Creek stops.

Bill
 

JPChurch

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I wasn't able to complete a full tour of this battlefield in 2011. When I return, I will definitely hit the Second Battle of Bull Run Creek stops.

Bill
If you're ever in my area, I'm 10 minutes from the Park. I can show you around. Best on a weekday in between rush hour traffic on 29-211; yes it gets real bad. Better on a weekend like on a Fall Sunday when it's not screaming hot/humid and the insects and deer ticks aren't so bad. Of course something like Deep Woods Off is something you should have on hand. The park is full of deer. Way over populated with them. Lots of turkey too. Last year I was driving on Groveton Rd (part of 2nd Manassas area) and a coyote ran across right in front of me.
 
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Buckeye Bill

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Great photos. Lived in Manassas a couple of years. Spent a lot of time on that battlefield.
Thank you, sir! I have only been to the Manassas National Battlefield once. I will be heading back soon and spend more time photographing the complete venue.

Bill
 
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Buckeye Bill

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Bill,
You know how much I always enjoy your photo tours. You don't just show me the locales, you actually manage to evoke a sense of being there in each of your photos. Pretty darned good, I say!

Pat
@Patrick H,

Your post is almost three years old but it still brings a big smile to my face.

Thanks,
Bill
 

Drew

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The First Battle of Bull Run (Battle of Manassas Junction) was fought on July 21, 1861 not far from Washington, D.C. It was the first major battle of the American Civil War. Federal forces were slow in positioning themselves, allowing Confederate reinforcements time to arrive by trains. Each side had about 18,000 poorly trained and poorly led troops in their first battle. It was a Confederate victory followed by a disorganized retreat of Federal forces to Washington, D.C.
I don't necessarily agree that Confederates were poorly lead. It's true, people from Washington, DC, went out to the battlefield in picnic mode, to 'observe' the battle and cheer for their team.

Thanks for the (great) pictures, but was 'Stonewall' Jackson really a poor leader? That's the first I've heard of this.
 
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