Major Charles W. Anderson, N.B. Forrest’s inspector general, his adjutant and friend

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Forrest’s farewell address speech, and many other of General Forrest's speeches, were written Major Charles W. Anderson. This man served with General Forrest as his inspector general and his adjutant from 1861 to 1865. He was also a close friend and confidant of General Forrest for the remainder of the General's life.
 

diane

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Good picture of Anderson! Major Anderson was originally signed up with the transportation department but requested a transfer to Forrest's command. He replaced Col Strange, who was consumptive, and was always by Forrest's side throughout the war. He even gets into the Ft Pillow controversy - his company was sent down to the bluffs to prevent the Union boats from landing and it's thought he could have or should have done more to prevent the killing there. He was indeed the closest to Forrest. He rode with him after the battle of Selma and convinced him not to go to Mexico, but to remain in Tennessee. He told the general that many young men had followed him to war and now needed his guidance in the aftermath of it. It's hard to find out much about him but after his death in 1908 his daughter sued the government for some type of reimbursements. Not sure what that was about, but it would be interesting to find out!
 

Rebforever

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"Major Charles W. Anderson, General Forrest's aide, wrote this eloquent farewell speech that the General delivered to his troops:
SOLDIERS:

By an agreement made between Liet. Gen. Taylor, commanding the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, and Major Gen. Canby, commanding United States forces, the troops of this department have been surrendered.

I do not think it proper or necessary at this time to refer to causes which have reduced us to this extremity; nor is it now a matter of material consequence to us how such results were brought about. That we are beaten is a self-evident fact, and any further resistance on our part would justly be regarded as the very height of folly and rashness.

The armies of Generals Lee and Johnson having surrendered, you are the last of all the troops of the Confederate States Army east of the Mississippi River to lay down your arms.

The Cause for which you have so long and so manfully struggled, and for which you have braved dangers, endured privations, and sufferings, and made so many sacrifices, is today hopeless. The government which we sought to establish and perpetuate, is at an end. Reason dictates and humanity demands that no more blood be shed. Fully realizing and feeling that such is the case, it is your duty and mine to lay down our arms - submit to the "powers that be" - and to aid in restoring peace and establishing law and order throughout the land.

The terms upon which you were surrendered are favorable, and should be satisfactory and acceptable to all. They manifest a spirit of magnanimity and liberality, on the part of the Federal authorities, which should be met, on our part, by a faithful compliance with all the stipulations and conditions therein expressed. As your Commander, I sincerely hope that every officer and soldier of my command will cheerfully obey the orders given, and carry out in good faith all the terms of the cartel.

Those who neglect the terms and refuse to be paroled may assuredly expect, when arrested, to be sent North and imprisoned. Let those who are absent from their commands, from whatever cause, report at once to this place, or to Jackson, Miss.; or, if too remote from either, to the nearest United States post or garrison, for parole.

Civil war, such as you have just passed through naturally engenders feelings of animosity, hatred, and revenge. It is our duty to divest ourselves of all such feelings; and as far as it is in our power to do so, to cultivate friendly feelings towards those with whom we have so long contended, and heretofore so widely, but honestly, differed. Neighborhood feuds, personal animosities, and private differences should be blotted out; and, when you return home, a manly, straightforward course of conduct will secure the respect of your enemies. Whatever your responsibilities may be to Government, to society, or to individuals, meet them like men.

The attempt made to establish a separate and independent Confederation has failed; but the consciousness of having done your duty faithfully, and to the end, will, in some measure, repay for the hardships you have undergone.

In bidding you farewell, rest assured that you carry with you my best wishes for your future welfare and happiness. Without, in any way, referring to the merits of the Cause in which we have been engaged, your courage and determination, as exhibited on many hard-fought fields, has elicited the respect and admiration of friend and foe. And I now cheerfully and gratefully acknowledge my indebtedness to the officers and men of my command whose zeal, fidelity and unflinching bravery have been the great source of my past success in arms.


I have never, on the field of battle, sent you where I was unwilling to go myself; nor would I now advise you to a course which I felt myself unwilling to pursue. You have been good soldiers, you can be good citizens. Obey the laws, preserve your honor, and the Government to which you have surrendered can afford to be, and will be, magnanimous."

AMEN!!

N.B. Forrest, Lieut. General
Headquarters, Forrest's Cavalry Corps
Gainesville, Alabama
May 9, 1865
 
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diane

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Anderson got the job of writer for Forrest when he filled out the battle report for Sacramento. Forrest wasn't much for proper speech although he could be eloquent, but Anderson was able to capture what Forrest wanted to say and his manner of saying it but with the polish Richmond required of its officers. So, we have Anderson being to Forrest what Hamilton was to Washington - a good secretary who could put his boss's character into buffed up words.
 

diane

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Another little bit on Anderson and why he was so helpful to Forrest. He very much knew his commander and could take the edge off his temper. In one battle, a soldier made the mistake of bolting from his post and racing to the rear, right past Forrest and Anderson. Forrest yelled at him to stop, but he was pickin' 'em up and layin' 'em down! Forrest then drew his pistol, aiming it at the fleeing soldier. Anderson said, "Oh, General! Think!" He did, and put his gun back in his belt. Anderson remarked later that he knew if he had said "Stop! Don't shoot!" Forrest would most certainly have killed the soldier. Appealing to his mind, though, did the trick!
 
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diane

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It never ceases to amaze me what you know about the GUY Col. diane. I don't know how the Yurok feel about reincarnation but as my wife sometimes says about me: "I think you were there."
:thumbsup:
Lol! No reincarnation - just another path! :wink: Anderson and other aides to Forrest are pretty interesting, because without them there wouldn't be a famous cavalryman!

Major Anderson was the officer D H Hill spoke to at Chickamauga. Hill was watching Forrest's troops in action and asked Anderson what infantry was he looking at? Anderson replied it was cavalry. Hill then wanted to meet their officer. Anderson rode off and fetched back 'a swarthy giant of a commander' as Hill recollected later. He took off his hat and said, "General Forrest, I wish to congratulate you and these brave men moving across that field like veteran infantry upon their magnificent behavior. In Virginia I made myself extremely unpopular with the cavalry because I said that, so far, I had not seen a dead man with spurs on. No one can speak disparagingly of such troops as yours." (From Morton's Artillery)
 

nitrofd

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Lol! No reincarnation - just another path! :wink: Anderson and other aides to Forrest are pretty interesting, because without them there wouldn't be a famous cavalryman!

Major Anderson was the officer D H Hill spoke to at Chickamauga. Hill was watching Forrest's troops in action and asked Anderson what infantry was he looking at? Anderson replied it was cavalry. Hill then wanted to meet their officer. Anderson rode off and fetched back 'a swarthy giant of a commander' as Hill recollected later. He took off his hat and said, "General Forrest, I wish to congratulate you and these brave men moving across that field like veteran infantry upon their magnificent behavior. In Virginia I made myself extremely unpopular with the cavalry because I said that, so far, I had not seen a dead man with spurs on. No one can speak disparagingly of such troops as yours." (From Morton's Artillery)
Diane, you are truly remarkable, I wish I had 10% of your knowledge on ol bedford
 
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diane

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Very interesting fellow. Liked to know more of his life before and after the war. I have tried some searching but haven't found much.

Should this be in Forrest Forum? Just seemed like it would be good there.
Oh, yes, it should be. Nate will be along presently! (I didn't get the lamp with the genie in it...:laugh:)
 

diane

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Major Charles W Anderson also has the interesting distinction of having been given Jack Hinson's famous sniper rifle, with which he plugged over 100 (some say 120) Yankees. When the war ended, Hinson gave it to Forrest, who passed it on to Anderson - for a variety of reasons! Anderson's descendants still have it.

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Very interesting fellow. Liked to know more of his life before and after the war. I have tried some searching but haven't found much.
Anderson immigrated to Tennessee in from Franklin, Kentucky. He attended school in Nashville and eventually settled in Rutherford County. He was a unionist at the start of the war and intended to remain neutral. He changed his mind when Federal soldiers ransacked and looted his home while he was away aiding casualties at a local hospital. He was especially angry that they had slashed portraits of his grandparents with a saber. He became a Confederate and as noted eventually served with Forrest.

After the war he returned to Rutherford County where he and his wife raised seven children and he worked as a railroad agent. He was cited as a source for several contemporary biographies including Wyeth and Jordan. He also was published in his own right and wrote a long article on Fort Pillow which appeared in the Confederate Veteran. He was active in veteran organizations and attended several reunions. He spoke to various CW interest groups and lived to age 82. He died in 1908.
 

diane

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Anderson immigrated to Tennessee in from Franklin, Kentucky. He attended school in Nashville and eventually settled in Rutherford County. He was a unionist at the start of the war and intended to remain neutral. He changed his mind when Federal soldiers ransacked and looted his home while he was away aiding casualties at a local hospital. He was especially angry that they had slashed portraits of his grandparents with a saber. He became a Confederate and as noted eventually served with Forrest.

After the war he returned to Rutherford County where he and his wife raised seven children and he worked as a railroad agent. He was cited as a source for several contemporary biographies including Wyeth and Jordan. He also was published in his own right and wrote a long article on Fort Pillow which appeared in the Confederate Veteran. He was active in veteran organizations and attended several reunions. He spoke to various CW interest groups and lived to age 82. He died in 1908.
This is very similar to what happened to Jack Hinson, whose gun Anderson inherited! He was neutral and quietly Unionist. He had even had Grant staying at his house when the general first moved on Fts Henry and Donelson. Then a Union captain - Lawes, I think - came upon two of the Hinson sons coming back from hunting and gave them a seriously nasty end for bushwhackers. Over 100 Yankees paid for those two boys, and Hinson was a rebel for the rest of his life.

Anderson's account of what happened at the bluffs at Ft Pillow are usually missing from the many discussions about that matter. He and Tyree Bell were present and might have done more, or might not. The upshot is Anderson blamed the arrival of the gunboat and lousy Union command.
 
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gjpratt

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This is one of my most cherished possessions. It is an order in Maj. Anderson’s hand to Col. James Edmondon, who was sweeping up after Forrest’s pursuit and capture of Streight. Here is the translation:

Col Edmondson
We have been ordered back to Tenneβee
You will move to Decatur with your command. Wagon trains
artillery etc immediately.
By order Brig Genl Forrest
Moulton May 12th 1863. C.W. Anderson
A A Genl

Some 30 years ago I was lucky enough to stumble upon a small archive of documents from Col. Edmondson’s heirs. They all are from the Spring of 1863. I am in the process (still) of compiling them into a story for NSCWT.

As ucv relics said in another thread, stay tuned.
 

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gjpratt

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Here is another one from the Edmondson archive. A May 6, 1863 order to Forrest. The second image is the reverse, forwarding to Col. Edmondson and signed by another Forrest AAG, Maj. John P. Strange. The content of the order is mundane. The date is significant.

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