Recent Find M1850 officer's sword metal scabbard

Taji04

Private
Joined
Jan 18, 2013
Location
The Great White North (brrrr)
Pards,

I just picked up an imported and unmarked (likely French) M1850 officer's sword with a metal scabbard made of sheet iron/"steel" with brass top and middle mounts, and drag. The etched blade and ray skin grip are in fantastic shape and everything is tight. But, I cannot tell if the scabbard was originally a dark color, that is "browned" (there is some evidence that it may have been dark at the brass mounts) or if it was painted silver (after the war?) as most of what was there is now what seems to be bare or light color on the metal. There is little patina on the brass and iron/steel. It has not been recently polished or cleaned.

The scabbard has no dents and is in great shape. I have done quite a bit of looking and cannot find similar imported or domestic common M1850 metal scabbard that is a silver/metal color. They all seem to have been browned or blackened. The question is, what was used to "brown" the metal and is there a way to restore the scabbard to its former glory to match the condition of the blade without painting it? Or someone who does restoration work?

Thanks in advance.
 

ucvrelics

Colonel
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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
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Looking forward to see some photos.
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Pards,

I just picked up an imported and unmarked (likely French) M1850 officer's sword with a metal scabbard made of sheet iron/"steel" with brass top and middle mounts, and drag. The etched blade and ray skin grip are in fantastic shape and everything is tight. But, I cannot tell if the scabbard was originally a dark color, that is "browned" (there is some evidence that it may have been dark at the brass mounts) or if it was painted silver (after the war?) as most of what was there is now what seems to be bare or light color on the metal. There is little patina on the brass and iron/steel. It has not been recently polished or cleaned.

The scabbard has no dents and is in great shape. I have done quite a bit of looking and cannot find similar imported or domestic common M1850 metal scabbard that is a silver/metal color. They all seem to have been browned or blackened. The question is, what was used to "brown" the metal and is there a way to restore the scabbard to its former glory to match the condition of the blade without painting it? Or someone who does restoration work?

Thanks in advance.
Pictures, pictures, pictures...
 

Taji04

Private
Joined
Jan 18, 2013
Location
The Great White North (brrrr)
Pictures as requested:

What do you all think about the scabbard?

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Taji04

Private
Joined
Jan 18, 2013
Location
The Great White North (brrrr)
I do not believe that this is a French piece.
Hmmmm.... I was under the impression that unmarked swords were likely imported. Did American makers also produce unmarked swords? How do you tell who made it, if it is possible? Or maybe German?

Also, it seems that it is unusual to have a metal scabbard that has this finish. Is this a clue also to who might have made it?
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Hmmmm.... I was under the impression that unmarked swords were likely imported. Did American makers also produce unmarked swords? How do you tell who made it, if it is possible? Or maybe German?

Also, it seems that it is unusual to have a metal scabbard that has this finish. Is this a clue also to who might have made it?
Generally the French foot officer swords have two unstopped fullers, one large and the other very small. The metal scabbard is not that unusual.

Would you provide close ups of the blade/guard area?
 

James N.

Colonel
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Feb 23, 2013
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Looks right as rain to me; the various squiggles, etc. on the mounts are typical of what might be termed a low-grade presentation piece, simply meaning it's slightly above average since it's got a tiny bit more embellishment than regulation. And according to regulations, Foot Officers' swords like this are supposed to have leather scabbards, but this one has a steel scabbard like a Staff & Field Officer's, not all that unusual for a wartime piece.
 
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