M1841 Mississippi Rifle

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johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
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The M1841 was one of the better arms available to soldiers in the early days of the Civil War. With a reputation gained in the Mexican War and on the frontier the M1841 was well known and well regarded.

It is a fine looking rifle with trigger guard, barrel bands and a large patch box made of brass on a dark walnut stock with a color case hardened lock and action and rust blued barrel made an extremely handsom long arm tha served both Union and Confederate soldiers very well.

Originally produced by Harper Ferry; famous manufacturers such as Eli Whitney and Remington manufactured large numbers as well. First issued in .54 caliber well over 75,000 were manufactured. In the late 1840's a large portion were rebored to the standard .58 minnie bullet. Twelve different versions were available to the soldier of the Civil War with the Colt Contract model being one of the most plentiful and certainly one of the most popular. With a suitable rear sight the weapon had a well earned reputation as a deadly arm in the hands of a man who knew how to shoot.

In 1852 South Carolina contracted with William Glaze to provide approximately 1000 copies of the M1841. They were every bit the equal of any made in the North and provided excellent service to SC volunteers in the Civil War.
Perhaps most widely used by the Union in the western theatre is was a favorite arm and there are no known instances of this arm being traded for Enfields or Springfields.
 

memphis

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May 31, 2005
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Rockland County, NY
johan_steele said:
The M1841 was one of the better arms available to soldiers in the early days of the Civil War. With a reputation gained in the Mexican War and on the frontier the M1841 was well known and well regarded.

It is a fine looking rifle with trigger guard, barrel bands and a large patch box made of brass on a dark walnut stock with a color case hardened lock and action and rust blued barrel made an extremely handsom long arm tha served both Union and Confederate soldiers very well.

Originally produced by Harper Ferry; famous manufacturers such as Eli Whitney and Remington manufactured large numbers as well. First issued in .54 caliber well over 75,000 were manufactured. In the late 1840's a large portion were rebored to the standard .58 minnie bullet. Twelve different versions were available to the soldier of the Civil War with the Colt Contract model being one of the most plentiful and certainly one of the most popular. With a suitable rear sight the weapon had a well earned reputation as a deadly arm in the hands of a man who knew how to shoot.

In 1852 South Carolina contracted with William Glaze to provide approximately 1000 copies of the M1841. They were every bit the equal of any made in the North and provided excellent service to SC volunteers in the Civil War.
Perhaps most widely used by the Union in the western theatre is was a favorite arm and there are no known instances of this arm being traded for Enfields or Springfields.
An interesting story to which I will add a short addendum. My favorite company, Fincastle Rifles Co. D 11th Virginia infantry were issued Mississippi Rifles. According to Captain John James of Co. D, his men were normally a little peeved about having them because they were always called out to perform skirmish duty in a battle. However they were on the far right flank of the PPT charge. James says that their assignment of being the skirmish line at Gettysburg on Day 3 saved most of the company because the shots went over them to the main body of troops. They still had casualties but not as bad as it could have been,

Bill
 
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