Lt. Thomas L. Feamster, 14th Va. Cav., his service and terrible wounding

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16thVA

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 8, 2008
Location
Philadelphia
I came across this story by accident, I was somewhat familiar with his brother S.W.N. Feamster, but had not read of his experiences. He lived to 1906. This is from the History of Greenbrier County.



Lieutenant Feamster was born in the Meadows, Greenbrier
county, November 12, 1829. He was a son of William and Patsy
(Alderson) Feamster and spent his entire life, save when in the
army, here in his native county.

When the great war between the States broke out, in 1861,
he was among the first to volunteer in defense of his native State,
joining Company A, afterwards the Fourteenth Virginia Cav-
alry, of which his brother-in-law, Moorman White, was captain,
himself first lieutenant and his brother, S. W. N. Feamster, second
lieutenant. As such officer, and for much of the time the com-
pany's commander, Lieutenant Feamster served through the four
years of that great struggle and made for himself a record of
which he was always justly proud. The Fourteenth regiment be-
longed to McCausland's brigade and was a part of Gen. J. E. B.
Stuart's famous cavalry, which won immortal fame on many a
hard-fought field.

A few incidents in the military service of the old veteran
whose death we mourn today are noteworthy and may be recalled
here with interest, particularly to his surviving comrades. Just
after the battle of Gettysburg, at Big Stone Church, Md., Lieuten-
ant Feamster alone captured an officer and three men, taking the
officer's sabre and a pair of pistols from each of the men, while
his own pistol was out of commission and useless. The sabre and
one pistol are yet in the possesssion of his family.

When scouting alone near Lewisburg, this county, within
the enemy's lines, he, all at once, saw ahead of him, on either side
of the road, a company or two of Federal soldiers. Drawing his
coat tightly around him and spurring his horse into a fast run, he
shouted at the top of his voice — 'the Rebels are coming !' and so
passed through the camp, causing consternation among the Yan-
kees, until he was beyond the danger of capture.

In Maryland, Lieutenant Feamster was one day riding in ad-
vance of his detachment chasing a squad of the enemy when he
passed through a cut in the top of a hill and was at once in close
quarters with the foe, who rose from both sides of the road and
fired upon him. One ball passed through his hat, one through his
necktie, one struck the pommel of his saddle and another cut the
skin of his horse's knee ; but the rider was untouched.

When General Early made his advance on Washington, in
the summer of 1864, and had gotten within the District of Columbia,
Lieutenant Feamster and his company, on duty on Rock creek,
were nearly surrounded by the enemy. Here he was badly wound-
ed, July 13, 1864., being shot through the neck and lower jaw, the
ball cutting the muscles of his tongue so badly that thereafter his
speech was much impaired. In his command were six physicians,
including Dr. Roe, the regimental surgeon. These ordered that he
be left on the field since there was no hope of his recovery. Be-
ing unable to talk he motioned for paper and pencil, and thus
wrote for his brother, Lieut. S. W. N. Feamster, who directed that
he be carried back. He was taken from the field on a blanket by
his brother and Dr. Bee, now of Mercer county, after which Capt.
John Hawver, of the Fourteenth, brought him off before him on
his horse. From the wound Lieutenant Feamster suffered more
or less until 1876. For some time after it was received he was
unable to eat, and drank only by putting his entire head in a bucket
and thus forcing the fluid into his throat.

Thus it appears that Lieutenant Feamster bore a conspicu-
ous and honorable part among the brave men who went out from
Greenbrier to fight for a cause they all held dear and believed to
be just.

As a citizen Mr. Feamster took an active interest in public af-
fairs. He read much and was fond of discussing public questions.
As a neighbor he was kind and obliging and as a husband and
father tender and affectionate.

On Sunday, December 16th, he suffered a stroke of paralysis
just as he was starting for church. From this he never recovered,
but continually grew weaker until the end came. With him, from
Tuesday after he was stricken, were his sons, William Cary and
Roy K., and his daughter, Miss Daisy, from Salisbury, N. C, his
sons, Lieut. Claude Newman, of the United States Army, O. Turk,
of St. Louis, and his daughters, Miss Ophelia, from Richmond,
Va., and Miss Zoe L., who has been at home with her parents.

The funeral service was held at the Presbyterian church on
Tuesday afternoon, the 1st inst., after which all that was mortal
of the old veteran was tenderly consigned to earth in the town
cemetery. Acting as honorary pallbearers were a number of his
old Confederate comrades."

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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
I came across this story by accident, I was somewhat familiar with his brother S.W.N. Feamster, but had not read of his experiences. He lived to 1906. This is from the History of Greenbrier County.



Lieutenant Feamster was born in the Meadows, Greenbrier
county, November 12, 1829. He was a son of William and Patsy
(Alderson) Feamster and spent his entire life, save when in the
army, here in his native county.

When the great war between the States broke out, in 1861,
he was among the first to volunteer in defense of his native State,
joining Company A, afterwards the Fourteenth Virginia Cav-
alry, of which his brother-in-law, Moorman White, was captain,
himself first lieutenant and his brother, S. W. N. Feamster, second
lieutenant. As such officer, and for much of the time the com-
pany's commander, Lieutenant Feamster served through the four
years of that great struggle and made for himself a record of
which he was always justly proud. The Fourteenth regiment be-
longed to McCausland's brigade and was a part of Gen. J. E. B.
Stuart's famous cavalry, which won immortal fame on many a
hard-fought field.

A few incidents in the military service of the old veteran
whose death we mourn today are noteworthy and may be recalled
here with interest, particularly to his surviving comrades. Just
after the battle of Gettysburg, at Big Stone Church, Md., Lieuten-
ant Feamster alone captured an officer and three men, taking the
officer's sabre and a pair of pistols from each of the men, while
his own pistol was out of commission and useless. The sabre and
one pistol are yet in the possesssion of his family.

When scouting alone near Lewisburg, this county, within
the enemy's lines, he, all at once, saw ahead of him, on either side
of the road, a company or two of Federal soldiers. Drawing his
coat tightly around him and spurring his horse into a fast run, he
shouted at the top of his voice — 'the Rebels are coming !' and so
passed through the camp, causing consternation among the Yan-
kees, until he was beyond the danger of capture.

In Maryland, Lieutenant Feamster was one day riding in ad-
vance of his detachment chasing a squad of the enemy when he
passed through a cut in the top of a hill and was at once in close
quarters with the foe, who rose from both sides of the road and
fired upon him. One ball passed through his hat, one through his
necktie, one struck the pommel of his saddle and another cut the
skin of his horse's knee ; but the rider was untouched.

When General Early made his advance on Washington, in
the summer of 1864, and had gotten within the District of Columbia,
Lieutenant Feamster and his company, on duty on Rock creek,
were nearly surrounded by the enemy. Here he was badly wound-
ed, July 13, 1864., being shot through the neck and lower jaw, the
ball cutting the muscles of his tongue so badly that thereafter his
speech was much impaired. In his command were six physicians,
including Dr. Roe, the regimental surgeon. These ordered that he
be left on the field since there was no hope of his recovery. Be-
ing unable to talk he motioned for paper and pencil, and thus
wrote for his brother, Lieut. S. W. N. Feamster, who directed that
he be carried back. He was taken from the field on a blanket by
his brother and Dr. Bee, now of Mercer county, after which Capt.
John Hawver, of the Fourteenth, brought him off before him on
his horse. From the wound Lieutenant Feamster suffered more
or less until 1876. For some time after it was received he was
unable to eat, and drank only by putting his entire head in a bucket
and thus forcing the fluid into his throat.

Thus it appears that Lieutenant Feamster bore a conspicu-
ous and honorable part among the brave men who went out from
Greenbrier to fight for a cause they all held dear and believed to
be just.

As a citizen Mr. Feamster took an active interest in public af-
fairs. He read much and was fond of discussing public questions.
As a neighbor he was kind and obliging and as a husband and
father tender and affectionate.

On Sunday, December 16th, he suffered a stroke of paralysis
just as he was starting for church. From this he never recovered,
but continually grew weaker until the end came. With him, from
Tuesday after he was stricken, were his sons, William Cary and
Roy K., and his daughter, Miss Daisy, from Salisbury, N. C, his
sons, Lieut. Claude Newman, of the United States Army, O. Turk,
of St. Louis, and his daughters, Miss Ophelia, from Richmond,
Va., and Miss Zoe L., who has been at home with her parents.

The funeral service was held at the Presbyterian church on
Tuesday afternoon, the 1st inst., after which all that was mortal
of the old veteran was tenderly consigned to earth in the town
cemetery. Acting as honorary pallbearers were a number of his
old Confederate comrades."

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Tom Elmore

2nd Lieutenant
Member of the Year
Joined
Jan 16, 2015
The regimental surgeon's name was Rowe, not Roe: Elhanon Winchester Rowe, born 8 November 1833 in Orange County, Virginia. Rowe graduated from the University of Pennsylvania's Medical Department in 1858. After the war, Rowe served as a senator in the Virginia legislature.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
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