Looking for woman disguised as Union soldier; died April 6, 1864 in Georgia or Alabama

Bloody7th

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It looks like author Shelby Harriel investigated grave 13607 for their book, Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in Civil War Mississippi. Shelby says the bodies interred at that time came from locations in Georgia and North Florida, and that when headboards were replaced in 1878, The "unkown lady" designation was changed to "Unknown US Soldier."
 

lupaglupa

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One article I cam across said that two other women had shown up at Andersonville, revealed their gender, and been sent away. But @Gary Morgan I'm assuming that anything I can find easily you have long ago seen. The source here I think would be a record NOT linked to the Andersonville camp. That's kind of the red herring in our search. If this unknown woman exists it sounds like she died in service, was buried somewhere in south Georgia or north Florida and was then reinterred at the cemetery that also holds the dead from Andersonville. I think using Andersonville in searches is pushing us towards stories about the camp, which likely don't concern this woman.
 
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The source here I think would be a record NOT linked to the Andersonville camp. That's kind of the red herring in our search. If this unknown woman exists it sounds like she died in service, was buried somewhere in south Georgia or north Florida and was then reinterred at the cemetery that also holds the dead from Andersonville. I think using Andersonville in searches is pushing us towards stories about the camp, which likely don't concern this woman.
Good point. Okay, let's regroup.

If she "died a soldier," she probably died of sickness, but in battle is also a possibility. Were there any battles in Western Georgia on or shortly before April 4, 1864? Or possibly in Western Alabama? I think North Florida would be too far away from a reinterrment - it's over 100 miles away from Andersonville.

Found a Congressional document that lists the places that those reinterred were moved from: "Macon, in Bibb County; Columbus, Muscogee County; Americus, Sumter County; Louisville, Jefferson County; from the line of the Central Railroad; and in Alabama, Eufala, Barbour County. The greatest distance being 125 miles. Some 10 or 12 bodies are yet to be removed." Unfortunately, this account says that there were presently Thirteen thousand, seven hundred and five internments in the cemetery, so it looks like the Unknown Lady was the first of these "ten or twelve" to be buried. Even so, this gives us some idea of where to look, and she likely died within or just beyond a 125 mile radius of Andersonville. Here's the link, if anyone is curious.

https://books.google.com/books?id=K...ge&q="andersonville cemetery" "13705"&f=false
She's listed at the top of the page, so I can't see who's buried just before her on the cemetery register, but the rest of the burials on her page are one unknown, but two of the others are listed as dying in August, 1864 and one died in just "1864." I can't make out the names of most of them, so I'll wait until I can get a clearer copy. One of them looks to be "Arthur Ford" who died in "1864."

I'll post more as I find more.
 
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I can't help but wonder that buried somewhere in the National Archives are some kind of interment records, or at least some record of where bodies had been exhumed, from where and by whom and where they were reinterred. Maybe in the Quartermaster's records?
A brilliant idea, Glen, but, unfortunately, not an option that's available to us at the moment. I can try submitting it in the form of a question and see what they say. They still aren't pulling records, but seem to be answering general questions, like what they have in their records and what number that item might be.

#SIGH#

Miss the National Archives.....
 
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There's a second cemetery register with the note "See 410 and 411" in the comments section. Going to see if anyone knows what that refers to.




Unknown Lady PG1.jpg
 

lupaglupa

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My first thought would be to go back in the register to number 410 or that number as the final three of another - for instance this page they all start with 13 so I'd try 13410. You could check it by doing a similar refer back with T S Everett, just below the Unknown Lady. Since you have some info on him he might serve as the key to what "see" means.
 
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The 13 is the first part of their grave numbers. They are more or less synchronous, with some gaps, like the raiders don't have numbers and about a dozen bodies were dug up and brought home after the war. and a few of the names on the grave markers turned out to belong to people who were not actually dead. So there were roughly 13,705 soldiers, sailors and marines (plus a few "citizens") buried in the cemetery before the Unknown Lady. Grave number 13410 would belong to a different reinterned soldier, since the last sequential prisoners grave is 12,848.
 
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Okay, here's one for those of you who are techno-whizzes. I asked to see the page before the Unknown Lady's listing, and got this instead. It shows the burial before hers in ink; the rest of the page is in very faded pencil. I can make out the words "Unknown Lady" (she's at the top of the list) and "Apr. 4, 1864" as well as the name under hers (T S Everett - although I may be off on the S). It looks like there's something written for her under "locality," but it's partly covered by the reference to the drowning in along the river in Hawkinsville on Jan 1, 1866. Can anyone make out what it says?

And at least we can pinpoint her second burial to after Jan 1, 1866. That helps, too, a little.

And the last 6 names on the page are the raiders, who died at Andersonville, Ga. I think they're included here at the end of the Civil War burials because the list in numerical and the raiders' graves are not numbered. I can't get away from these guys....


Unknown Lady Page Before Downsized.jpg
 

lupaglupa

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Hawkinsville in Pulaski County Georgia is on the west bank of the Ocmulgee River, just as that reads. It's about 45 miles south/south-east of Macon. I don't know what battles took place in that area.
 
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I think pretty soon we'll probably hit the wall where we can go no further, but for now we're still going.

Yes, @lelliott19, that does help. It looks like the penciled in word under the ink entry is probably "County" or maybe "Country." The question now is what it the penciled word partially peeking out from under the ink entry. Maybe someone from Georgia can recognize it. I don't know enough about the counties in Georgia to decipher it.

@lupaglupa, my gut is that she died of illness or accident rather than in battle. It's much more statistically probable, but I could be wrong. None of the others buried near her have anything close to her date of death.
 

Bloody7th

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I suspect the Hawkinsville connection is a red herring and only associated with the drowning victim. That part of Georgia, from what I understand, was largely untouched by the war until 1865 with Wilson's cavalry raid (I may be wrong here). I'm not able to make out the pencil smudges that might be related to the unknown lady, though.
 

lupaglupa

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Certainly dying from illness was common enough that it is at least if not more likely than dying in battle. So - who was there? As @Bloody7th points out, this wasn't a hotspot area. Of course, if Unknown Lade wasn't associated with that note we know even less.

I came across several references to a book, They Fought Like Demons, about female soldiers. The authors work at the National Archives and are said to have looked at every reference to female soldiers in archive records. Maybe one of them would know of something?
 
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Certainly dying from illness was common enough that it is at least if not more likely than dying in battle. So - who was there? As @Bloody7th points out, this wasn't a hotspot area. Of course, if Unknown Lade wasn't associated with that note we know even less.

I came across several references to a book, They Fought Like Demons, about female soldiers. The authors work at the National Archives and are said to have looked at every reference to female soldiers in archive records. Maybe one of them would know of something?
I've already been in touch with Shelby Harriell, who wrote Behind the Rifle. She agreed with my idea that 13706 is a woman and 101 is a man, and that they got mixed up because of a misinterpretation of the 1867 newspaper account (a "row" can be verticle or horizontal). I'll have to see if I can find the author of They Fought Like Demons. I already have a post into the NARA looking for records that might list original reinternments. My Millen Prison friend thinks that the pencil notation might say Bibb or Tift County. I think I can see one of those in the shape of it, but what do you folks think?
 

lupaglupa

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Here is the page with inverted colors. It looks more to me like the faint writing is what we see from a page behind.


Unknown Lady Page Reverse.jpg
 

lelliott19

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My Millen Prison friend thinks that the pencil notation might say Bibb or Tift County. I think I can see one of those in the shape of it, but what do you folks think?
The first pencil word looks like "Well" or "Webb" or "Wall" or "Hobb." I actually think the second pencil word might be something other than "County." It ends in "y" but to me it looks like it ends in "stny" our "lny" Here is an enlargement of the section of the page; increased contrast +40% and decreased brightness -40%. Maybe it will help?
1614299768629.png
 
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