Longstreet Returns to Antietam - 1893


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
5,951
Antietam map 1895edits snip.JPG

In June of 1893, at age 72, General James Longstreet returned to the battlefield at Antietam to assist the "Antietam Board" in determining accurate battle lines. Apparently, Longstreet's return to Antietam is not as well known as his return visit to Gettysburg. Anyway, over the course of the visit, Longstreet wound up sharing a whole lot more than just the location of his troops, as recorded by a correspondent of the Washington Post.

"Recently a party of ex-soldiers composed of General Heth and Colonel Stearns, the government commission for marking the battle lines [Antietam Board]; General Longstreet and Colonel Latrobe, of his staff; Major W. H. Mills; Mr. C. F. Cobb, one of McClellan's scouts in the Antietam campaign, and the subscriber visited the battlefield of Antietam. General Longstreet and Colonel Latrobe went up with the commissioners to definitely settle the positions of some of the general's troops during the battle of September 17, 1862.

Notwithstanding his seventy-two years, General Longstreet is clear and vigorous in mind, with a wonderful memory. Physically, he is not so well off: one arm is almost totally paralyzed from the gunshot wound inflicted by his own men in the Wilderness, and among other infirmities of old age, he is very deaf, making necessary the use of a speaking tube. His eye is clear and his step measurably firm. He still enjoys a good dinner, and is a genial raconteur in conversation.

He talked to our party unreservedly on every conceivable phase of the war. He has long been engaged upon his autobiography, the manuscript of which is now ready for the printer. His visit North was mainly to arrange for its publication and for some map work.....His opinions and criticisms were so important and interesting that I felt warranted in taking them down......"
<Stay tuned for Longstreet's opinions on Early, Ewell, Hill, Jackson, Jeff Davis, and more. Good stuff!>

Sources: Ezra A. Carman papers, Manuscripts and Archives Division, New York Public Library.
Article reprinted from the Washington Post of June 1893, the article appeared in The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, VA.), November 12, 1911, page 3.
Longstreet 1893 trip to Antietam.JPG
 
Last edited:

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
5,951
Longstreet would go on to serve as US Commissioner of Railroads from 1897 until his death in 1904. Most of his post-war years were spent on his farm in Gainesville, GA where he tended his orchards and vineyards. Due to the nature of the ground, some of his neighbors jokingly called the farm "Gettysburg."

During the return visit to the Antietam battlefield in 1893, the correspondent of the Washington Post noted:
"His opinions and criticisms were so important and interesting that I felt warranted in taking them down......"
And thank goodness he invested the time in "taking them down."

<Stay tuned for Longstreet's opinions on Early, Ewell, Hill, Jackson, Joe Johnson, Jeff Davis, and more. Oh yeah. I forgot Bragg. Yep. He even gives his opinion of Bragg. Good stuff!>:D
 

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
5,951
An article clipped from the June 9, 1893, edition of the Cambridge Transcript (Cambridge, Vermont) describing Longstreet's visit.
:thumbsup: Thanks for finding that and posting it @ErnieMac
OMG!!! I can't wait to read that! I love you Laura!!!
I knew you'd love it Ellie. :smile:
@FarawayFriend @War Horse @novushomus @LeesWarhorse you guys will want to see the OP, the clip ErnieMac posted above, and the series of opinions to follow. I'm going to post Longstreet's opinions of the various Generals in separate threads so people can easily find them. I'll start with Bragg. :D
 

Northern Light

Lt. Colonel
Forum Host
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
Messages
10,744

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
5,951

James N.

Lt. Colonel
Forum Host
Civil War Photo Contest
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Messages
11,562
Location
East Texas
Notwithstanding his seventy-two years, General Longstreet is clear and vigorous in mind, with a wonderful memory. Physically, he is not so well off: one arm is almost totally paralyzed from the gunshot wound inflicted by his own men in the Wilderness, and among other infirmities of old age, he is very deaf, making necessary the use of a speaking tube. His eye is clear and his step measurably firm. He still enjoys a good dinner, and is a genial raconteur in conversation...
I don't know what to think about the poor old aged broken-down senile curmudgeon General - especially since I'm the exact same age he was at this time. Obviously people weren't supposed to live this long back then!
 

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Top