Lone Star Unionism, Dissent, and Resistance: Other Sides of Civil War Texas

chellers

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lonestar cwt.jpg


Jesine mess this is we are in the mus F. de la Teja (Editor)
University of Oklahoma Press (March 9, 2016)

Most histories of Civil War Texas—some starring the fabled Hood’s Brigade, Terry’s Texas Rangers, or one or another military figure—depict the Lone Star State as having joined the Confederacy as a matter of course and as having later emerged from the war relatively unscathed. Yet as the contributors to this volume amply demonstrate, the often neglected stories of Texas Unionists and dissenters paint a far more complicated picture. Ranging in time from the late 1850s to the end of Reconstruction, Lone Star Unionism, Dissent, and Resistance restores a missing layer of complexity to the history of Civil War Texas.

The authors—all noted scholars of Texas and Civil War history—show that slaves, freedmen and freedwomen, Tejanos, German immigrants, and white women all took part in the struggle, even though some never found themselves on a battlefield. Their stories depict the Civil War as a conflict not only between North and South but also between neighbors, friends, and family members. By framing their stories in the analytical context of the “long Civil War,” Lone Star Unionism, Dissent, and Resistance reveals how friends and neighbors became enemies and how the resulting violence, often at the hands of secessionists, crossed racial and ethnic lines. The chapters also show how ex-Confederates and their descendants, as well as former slaves, sought to give historical meaning to their experiences and find their place as citizens of the newly re-formed nation.

Concluding with an account of the origins of Juneteenth—the nationally celebrated holiday marking June 19, 1865, when emancipation was announced in Texas—Lone Star Unionism, Dissent, and Resistance challenges the collective historical memory of Civil War Texas and its place in both the Confederacy and the United States. It provides material for a fresh narrative, one including people on the margins of history and dispelling the myth of a monolithically Confederate Texas.

http://www.amazon.com/Lone-Star-Uni.../ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Disclaimer: This post is neither a recommendation nor solicitation by CivilWarTalk or Chellers. It is solely for informational purposes.
 

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Pat Young

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About the editor:

Jesine mess this is we are in the mus F. de la Teja is Jerome H. and Catherine E. Supple Professor of Southwestern Studies, Regents’ Professor of History, and Director of the Center for the Study of the Southwest at Texas State University-San Marcos. He has published extensively on Spanish, Mexican, and Republic-era Texas, most recently an edited volume with Timothy Matovina,Recollections of a Tejano Life: Antonio Menchaca in Texas History, and a volume of biographies, Tejano Leadership in Mexican and Revolutionary Texas, and is book review editor for the Southwestern Historical Quarterly. He served as the inaugural Texas State Historian (2007-2009), and has been president of the Texas State Historical Association. Currently he serves on the board of directors of Humanities Texas and the San Jacinto Museum of History. He is a recipient of the Americanism Medal from the Daughters of the American Revolution, a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association and the Texas Catholic Historical Society, and a member of the Philosophical Society of Texas and the Texas Institute of Letters.
 

chellers

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About the editor:

Jesine mess this is we are in the mus F. de la Teja is Jerome H. and Catherine E. Supple Professor of Southwestern Studies, Regents’ Professor of History, and Director of the Center for the Study of the Southwest at Texas State University-San Marcos. He has published extensively on Spanish, Mexican, and Republic-era Texas, most recently an edited volume with Timothy Matovina,Recollections of a Tejano Life: Antonio Menchaca in Texas History, and a volume of biographies, Tejano Leadership in Mexican and Revolutionary Texas, and is book review editor for the Southwestern Historical Quarterly. He served as the inaugural Texas State Historian (2007-2009), and has been president of the Texas State Historical Association. Currently he serves on the board of directors of Humanities Texas and the San Jacinto Museum of History. He is a recipient of the Americanism Medal from the Daughters of the American Revolution, a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association and the Texas Catholic Historical Society, and a member of the Philosophical Society of Texas and the Texas Institute of Letters.
Sounds like he knows his stuff. Thank you,sir.
 

Frito

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That would be a very good book to read. Not all Texans supported the Southern cause, as some remained loyal to the Union and some just wanted to be left alone. During this time of conflict Texas had a dark side and sadly quite a few people were shot and hung because of their convictions. That chapter of Texas History I doubt will be found in any Texas History book.
 

Pat Young

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That would be a very good book to read. Not all Texans supported the Southern cause, as some remained loyal to the Union and some just wanted to be left alone. During this time of conflict Texas had a dark side and sadly quite a few people were shot and hung because of their convictions. That chapter of Texas History I doubt will be found in any Texas History book.
Anyone who went to school in Texas recall learning this in high school.
 

Georgia Sixth

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Anyone who went to school in Texas recall learning this in high school.
Yes. And we learned about how Sam Houston resisted secession and was forced from the governership for it and we learned about the German immigrants who opposed secession and the massacre down in the Hill Country and we learned of the hangings in Gainesville.
 

Pat Young

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Yes. And we learned about how Sam Houston resisted secession and was forced from the governership for it and we learned about the German immigrants who opposed secession and the massacre down in the Hill Country and we learned of the hangings in Gainesville.
Thanks. Very good.
 

Frito

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Well that's very interesting wish they had gone into detail like that when I was in High School in Texas. I knew about Houston from class but nothing was ever said about the Hill country massacre or Gainesville. Found out about that years later on a visit to Fredericksburg Texas.
 
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chellers

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Anyone who went to school in Texas recall learning this in high school.
Yes. And we learned about how Sam Houston resisted secession and was forced from the governership for it and we learned about the German immigrants who opposed secession and the massacre down in the Hill Country and we learned of the hangings in Gainesville.
Well that's very interesting wish they had gone into detail like that when I was in High School in Texas. I knew about Houston from class but nothing was ever said about the Hill country massacre or Gainesville. Found out about that years later on a visit to Fredericksburg Texas.
Georgia Sixth, you must have had an exceptional history teacher, school district, or private school to have had the good fortune to have learned all this in high school. Granted I've forgotten a few things, but all I recall learning about Texas history were the Alamo, San Jacinto, and Goliad.
 

Georgia Sixth

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Georgia Sixth, you must have had an exceptional history teacher, school district, or private school to have had the good fortune to have learned all this in high school. Granted I've forgotten a few things, but all I recall learning about Texas history were the Alamo, San Jacinto, and Goliad.
I grew up in a university town and I a lot of stuff bled over into the schools. In fact, my junior high school was an "laboratory" school right on the college campus. Guess that makes me a lab rat of sorts.
 

DaveBrt

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Anyone who went to school in Texas recall learning this in high school.
My Texas History class covered Hood's Brigade and their battles, but little else. Only learned about the Unionists about 5 years ago. High school was in the early '60's -- a time when the country needed to be strong and unified against the Communist threats; dissenters were not well thought of.
 

Pat Young

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My Texas History class covered Hood's Brigade and their battles, but little else. Only learned about the Unionists about 5 years ago. High school was in the early '60's -- a time when the country needed to be strong and unified against the Communist threats; dissenters were not well thought of.
But weren't the Confederates classic violent dissenters?
 



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