Lone Star Confederates: Hat Pins and Badges

AUG

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Civil War Texas Star Pin.jpg

A star pinned or sewn to the hat is, of course, best associated with troops from the Lone Star State; however, it was also very popular with Mississippians and was worn by some Confederate troops from other states as well.

The lone star was widely viewed as a symbol of secession and independence at the time. Different variations of lone star flags were flown in the Texas Revolution and adopted as the official flag of the Republic of Texas, the final design becoming the state flag. It also appears on many early secessionist banners and Southern state flags of the Civil War.

One of the most famous, the Bonnie Blue Flag, was presented to the Mississippi Secession Convention amid cheers after the Ordinance of Secession was passed on January 9, 1861. It was soon after applied to the state flag. That might explain why the lone star was also worn by so many Mississippi troops. It is believed that the Bonnie Blue and possibly other flags were inspired by the banner of the Republic of West Florida (as explained Here), one of the first to bear a single star after the province declared itself independent from Spain in 1810.

Secessionists may have also seen the lone star as symbolic of the removal of their state's star from the American flag, thence their state from the Union.

Whatever inspired them, many Southerners heading off to war pinned or sewed stars to their hat or uniform. If not only to make a political statement, if any, it certainly gave some of them a jaunty, audacious look that expressed the attitude of the typical young volunteer. Obviously, for Texans it was also a symbol of state pride and many continued to wear the lone star throughout the war.

This thread is for compiling any photos of Confederates troops wearing a star on their hat or uniform (other than rank insignia). I'll post a few from Texas first, then Mississippi and other states.
 
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AUG

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Star Rifles, 1st Texas Infantry.jpg

Members of the Star Rifles, Company D of the 1st Texas Infantry, from Jefferson, Marion County, Texas.

Standing L-R: Lt. Cornelius R. Curtright, Absalom Carter "A.C." Oliver, Henry P. Oliver
Seated L-R: John A. Oliver, William H. Oliver, Francis Thomas "Frank" Oliver

Lt. Curtright later resigned in 1862; Henry and John Oliver died of pneumonia early that year. William died of wounds received at Chickamauga. Only Absalom and Francis made it to Appomattox.

John B. Henderson, Co. D, 1st Texas Infantry.jpg

Another member of the Star Rifles, Pvt. John Beverly Henderson.

Val C. Giles 4.jpg

Pvt. Val C. Giles, Co. B "Tom Green Rifles," 4th Texas Infantry. Though you can't see it, Giles says in his memoirs, Rags and Hope, that while having his photo taken at William Bridgers' gallery in Austin he pinned the side of his hat up with a star: "While Bridges was placing me in position for this ambrotype, he suggested that I would look more fierce and military if I would pin one side of my hat back with a star. He had a supply of stars on hand, which he sold for a dollar apiece. The idea pleased the old gentleman, the star was bought, and one side of the hat pinned back."

1st-Texas-Camp-Quantico-1.jpg

1st Texas Infantry in winter quarters at Camp Quantico, Va., 1861-62. This is one of a series of four photos taken by Pvt. Solomon Thomas "Tom" Blessing, a member of Company L and photographer in Galveston and Houston in civilian life. You can see the stars and unit designation on their forage caps best in this image.

Terry's Texas Rangers.jpg

Members of the 8th Texas Cavalry "Terry's Texas Rangers."

Jesse Rice, Co. B, 8th Texas Cavalry.jpg

Pvt. Jesse Rice, Co. B, 8th Texas Cavalry.

J. Lew Compton, Co. B, 8th Texas Cavalry.jpg

Pvt. J. Lew Compton, Co. B, 8th Texas Cavalry.
 

AUG

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Cpl. John Powers Offield, Co. A, 12th Texas Cavalry.jpg

Cpl. John Powers Offield, Co. A, 12th Texas Cavalry.

George W. Woodall.jpg

George W. Woodall, Co. G, 14th Texas Cavalry.

James Box.jpg

Sgt. James Robert Box, Co. D, 14th Texas Cavalry. Box served in the regiment from Jan. 1, 1861 to May 11, 1865. This photo was made in Mobile shortly before the end of the war, prior to the Siege of Spanish Fort where Box was captured on April 8, 1865. He has his hat pinned up on the left side with what appears to be a star. More on him here: http://cemeteryworks.com/boxjr_cwss.html

James Phillip Craver, Co. D, 32nd Texas Cavalry.jpg

Pvt. James Phillip Craver, Co. D, 32nd Texas Cavalry. Craver enlisted at Jefferson, Texas, in Dec. 1862, just short of 18 years of age. The 32nd Texas Cav. permanently dismounted and fighting as infantry in Ector's Brigade, Army of Tennessee, Craver was severely wounded at Kennesaw Mountain through the right lung. The wound was pronounced fatal, though he proved the surgeons wrong and recovered. He returned home to marry, raise a large family and lived until 1906.

Cristobal Benavidas.jpg

Capt. Cristobal Benavides, commanding a company in his brother Santos' regiment, the 33rd Texas Cavalry.

Col. Richard B. Hubbard, 22nd Texas Infantry.jpg

Col. Richard B. Hubbard, 22nd Texas Infantry.

Douglas' Texas Battery.jpg

Two unidentified members of Good's/Douglas's Texas Battery.

Alf Davis, Douglas' Texas Battery 2.jpg

2nd Lt. Alf Davis, first served in Good's Texas Battery, later in the 27th Texas Cavalry.

William David Swann, Douglas' Texas Battery.jpg

Pvt. William David Swann, Good's/Douglas's Texas Battery.
 

AUG

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#4
Now for Mississippi....

W. S. Featherston.jpg

Winfield Scott Featherson, holding a hat pinned up on the side with a star. Colonel of the 17th Mississippi Infantry, Featherston was later promoted to brigadier general in March 1862, commanding a Mississippi brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia and later in the Army of Tennessee.

Lt. William P. Smith, Co. K, 21st Mississippi Infantry.jpg

3rd Lt. William P. Smith, Co. K "New Albany Greys," 21st Mississippi Infantry. A 35-year-old merchant from Pontotoc, Mississippi, he fought throughout the Peninsula Campaign and Seven Days before resigning due to disability in August 1862.

Thomas P. Buford.jpg

Cpl. Thomas P. Buford, Co. G "Lamar Rifles," 11th Mississippi Infantry. A farmer originally from Tennessee, Buford enlisted in April 1861 at 28 and served throughout the war.

Walter Scott Buford.jpg

Pvt. Walter Scott Buford, also in Co. G of the 11th Mississippi. He was a 19-year-old student from College Hill, MS, when he enlisted in August 1861, serving until mortally wounded at Second Manassas on August 30, 1862.

William Penn Ellis, Co. E, 2nd Mississippi Infantry.jpg

Pvt. William Penn Ellis, Co. E "Calhoun Rifles," 2nd Mississippi Infantry. Enlisted May 1, 1861 at 17 years old. Captured at Gettysburg on July 1, probably in the Railroad Cut, and sent to Fort Delaware. Released after taking the Oath of Allegiance, June 6, 1865.

Thomas P. Gooch, Co. C, 20th Mississippi Infantry.jpg

Pvt. Thomas P. Gooch, Co. C "Carroll Guards," 20th Mississippi Infantry. Enlisted at 19 in Carrollton, MS, June 1861. Gooch was first taken prisoner when Fort Donelson fell, exchanged, then captured again at Edwards Ferry, MS, June 10, 1863. He was paroled from Fort Delaware in June 1865.

John D. Jones, Co. I, 39th Mississippi Infantry.jpg

Pvt. John D. Jones, Co. I "Burt Avengers," 39th Mississippi Infantry. Enlisted at Dry Creek, MS, on May 1, 1862. Jones served with the regiment until killed in the battle of Franklin, Nov. 30, 1864, and is buried in the McGavock Cemetery there.

Charles C. Frierson, Co. F, 15th Mississippi Infantry.jpg

Pvt. Charles C. Frierson, Co. F "Water Valley Rifles," 15th Mississippi Infantry. Enlisting in May 1861 at 23, Frierson fought through most of the regiment's battles, rising to sergeant. Appointed 1st lieutenant and ensign in September 1864, he was wounded while carrying the 15th's colors at Franklin. Later taken prisoner during the Confederate retreat and sent to Camp Chase. Exchanged in March 1865.
More on him here: http://www.oocities.org/pentagon/quarters/1864/frierson_letters.htm

Pvt. James Monroe Callaway, Co. G, 20th Mississippi Infantry.jpg

Pvt. James Monroe Callaway, Company G, "Barksdale Greys," 20th Mississippi Infantry.

Pvt. James R. Wallace, Co. D, 35th Mississippi Infantry.jpg

Pvt. James R. Wallace, Company D, "Fort Donelson Avengers," 35th Mississippi Infantry. He was mortally wounded at Vicksburg and died June 15, 1863.

Uniform and weapons could be photographer's props in the above two images, since they are in different units but uniformed and armed exactly alike. Found both images on Pinterest; couldn't find any other personal info on them. Some of the other photos I'm posting are from the Portraits of Conflict books.
 
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AUG

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Alabama....

2nd Lt. Benjamin Hudson Russell, Co. H, 16th Alabama Infantry.jpg

2nd Lt. Benjamin Hudson Russell, Co. H "Russell Valley War Hornets," 16th Alabama Infantry. Killed at Murfreesboro, Dec. 31, 1862.

Thomas Marion Hays, Co. K, 14th Alabama Infantry.jpg

Pvt. Thomas Marion Hays, Co. K "Louina Guards," 14th Alabama Infantry.

William M. Robertson, Co. K, 14th Alabama Infantry.jpg

Pvt. William M. Robertson, also in Co. K of the 14th Alabama.

Pvt. John Washington Parish, Co. C, 37th Alabama Infantry.jpg

Pvt. John Washington Parish, Company C, 37th Alabama Infantry.

Bartley Pace Bynum, 55th Alabama Infantry.jpg

Bartley Pace Bynum, entered service in March 1862 as 3rd lieutenant in Co. K, 31st Alabama Infantry. Later acted as chaplain. Served til May 1, 1865.
 

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Other Southern states....

Gen. William Mahone.jpg

Gen. William Mahone, a native Virginian who commanded the 6th Virginia Infantry and later a Virginia brigade in the ANV before rising to division command.

John Poole Schermerhorn.jpg

John Pool Schermerhorn, Co. K, 1st Cavalry Regiment, Wise Legion; later designated the 10th Virginia Cavalry.

James Henry Woodson, Co. H, 2nd Virginia Cavalry.jpg

James Henry Woodson, Co. H "Appomattox Rangers," 2nd Virginia Cavalry.

D. A. Dickert.jpg

D. Augustus "Gus" Dickert, Co. H, 3rd South Carolina Infantry. Enlisted at 16 in 1861 as a sergeant. Was wounded four times: Savage Station, Fredericksburg, Knoxville, and the Wilderness. Rose through the ranks until promoted to captain in April 1864. Later authored "History of Kershaw's Brigade."

Peterson Borrum Ramage, Co. L, 1st South Carolina Infantry.jpg

Peterson Borrum Ramage, Co. L "Rhett Guard," Gregg's 1st South Carolina Infantry.

Pvt. Thomas Holman, Co. C, 13th Tennessee Infantry.jpg

Pvt. Thomas Holman, Co. C "Secession Guards," 13th Tennessee Infantry. Company C contained men from both Tennessee and Mississippi, so that might explain the star.

Pvt. Samuel H. Wells, Co. H, 31st Tennessee Infantry.jpg

Pvt. Samuel H. Wells, Co. H, 31st Tennessee Infantry.

William T. Anderson.jpg

Missouri bushwhacker, William T. "Bloody Bill" Anderson.
 
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#8
Here's an unidentified one that I find particularly fascinating. This man has a slouch hat with a star badge on it but also appears to be wearing a Federal frock. He's brandishing a civilian shotgun and powder horn. It's possible he's a Reb in captured duds. My understanding is that a lot of Federal clothing and equipment captured from US depots in Texas were issued out to TX Confeds early in the war. Many members of Sibley's New Mexico Brigade, for example, likely rode off to war looking like this fellow.
tumblr_ol4ryh7XnJ1rm9yhio1_1280.jpg
 

AUG

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Nice group portrait of three Mississippians. Found on Tennessee State Library & Archives' digital collection.

Mississippi portrait.jpg

Description:

Reprint of a daguerreotype of two enlisted soldiers and officer, Nicholas Blackwell. James Blackwell was an ensign and flag bearer for Co. K, 21st Miss. Inf. Regt. Nicholas was a captain and doctor. Courtesy of the Bartlett Historical Society.

1862
http://teva.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15138coll6/id/4017/rec/3
According to Remembering Mississippi's Confederates by Jeff T. Giambrone, James Blackwell is at center and his brother Nicholas is on the right. The soldier on the left is not identified but may be John Calvin Pruitt, stepbrother of James and Nicholas. All members of the New Albany Grays, Co. K, 21st Mississppi Infantry.
 

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da5e6cd116125cac05613b5acb585675--badge-maker-king-kong.jpg

Couldn't find a better version than this one on Pinterest, but here's a photo of Eric Erson.

Short bio from his Find A Grave memorial:

When it was learned that war was inevitable, this 21-year old native of Sweden left his livelihood as a merchant in Lincolnton, North Carolina to enlist in the defense of the southern cause. On April 25, 1861 he became a member of North Carolina's Bloody Bethel Regiment, or 1st North Carolina Volunteer Infantry. His time with this famed regiment ended with his mustering out in November 1861. On April 28, 1862, he was commissioned a Captain and given the responsibility to lead Company H of the 52nd Regiment North Carolina Troops. It was his fortune to have a finger of his right hand amputated after the blood letting at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, a place where his regiment suffered terribly during "Pickett's Charge" on July 3, 1863. On April 15, 1864, he was elevated to the rank of Major. Then came a moment during an August 25, 1864 action known in history as the Battle of Ream's Station, Virginia. It was here where he was once again wounded. More serious than his Gettysburg wound, this second battle wound was to his thigh. Hospitalization, then a required furlough to convalesce followed. His promotion to Lieutenant Colonel is dated August 30, 1864. On April 9, 1865, his four years of war drew to an end at Appomattox.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/26350687/eric-erson
 



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