Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Cavalier

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@danny Ces't la guerre, I guess. Like Patton, or Ney, or Stuart, he's not everybody's cup of tea but, from what I have read about him, I like him, a lot.

John
 

Scott1967

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Maybe to exchange them as captives against some indians...but I doubt the Sioux may have acted this way.
Unfortunatly some Reno's troopers were taken alive (during the initial attack on the camp), two or three at least, their severed heads were found later on the site of the encampment...

I have not heard about this what source did you get it from?, I know after battle mutilation occurred and I have read lot of accounts but non mention troopers being taken alive even by the Indian sources.
 

MAJOR DUNDEE

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I have read at least two times this story of captured soldiers, in two different books, a US one, and a french (surely "LBH autopsy of a legendary battle")but I don't remember their tittle... I'll have a look at them quickly when I go back home and quote them here.
 

Ole Miss

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Lieutenant James Sturgis, son of General Samuel Sturgis, his body was never found just an article of clothing or 2.
Regards
David
 

MAJOR DUNDEE

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Here, you can see this University of Montana publication : https://scholarworks.umt.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=12198&context=etd wich is very interesting.

About the "severed" heads found later in the abandonned camp, it seems to G.Herendeen cavalry scout account , I found these on the web (and didin't have a look yet on my books but I will soon).
"Seventh Cavalry scout George Herendeen added, "The heads of four white soldiers were found in the Sioux camp that had been severed from their trunks, but the bodies could not be found on the battlefield or in the village."

The link is here :
 

James N.

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Go to the Shenandoah and imagine everything burned and in ruins.
Although I understand your point of view, Custer was scarcely the one solely at fault for what was known as The Burning, which incidentally targeted barns, mills, and crops in the field but not private dwellings. He commanded only half the cavalry assigned to that particular operation, Wesley Merritt leading the other half; both were acting under direct orders from their immediate superior and commander of the Cavalry Corps Alfred Torbert who was in turn carrying out the orders of Army of the Shenandoah commander Phil Sheridan as directed by U.S. Grant in his overall instructions for operations in the Valley.
 

danny

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Although I understand your point of view, Custer was scarcely the one solely at fault for what was known as The Burning, which incidentally targeted barns, mills, and crops in the field but not private dwellings. He commanded only half the cavalry assigned to that particular operation, Wesley Merritt leading the other half; both were acting under direct orders from their immediate superior and commander of the Cavalry Corps Alfred Torbert who was in turn carrying out the orders of Army of the Shenandoah commander Phil Sheridan as directed by U.S. Grant in his overall instructions for operations in the Valley.
Sorry. Custer and Sheridan are my arch villains
 

James N.

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Sorry. Custer and Sheridan are my arch villains
Trust me - I can easily understand. Conversely, from an early age I was fascinated by the career of the "Boy General" - I probably watched Errol Flynn's They Died With Their Boots On too many times on TV! However, even so, it's best not to let our feelings cloud our judgement.
 

danny

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Trust me - I can easily understand. Conversely, from an early age I was fascinated by the career of the "Boy General" - I probably watched Errol Flynn's They Died With Their Boots On too many times on TV! However, even so, it's best not to let our feelings cloud our judgement.
I know I watched it a bunch. Fun movie
 

MAJOR DUNDEE

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Maybe Flynn's/Walsh's team best film.

48.jpg
 

Cavalier

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I am fortunate to have it on DVD so I can watch it frequently. A fun movie is right, in my opinion. Many years ago my friends and I tried to bid on the famous watch used in the movie. Needless to say we were outbid. It would have been cool to own, evan if it was only a movie prop.

John
 

mkyzzzrdet

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I am fortunate to have it on DVD so I can watch it frequently. A fun movie is right, in my opinion. Many years ago my friends and I tried to bid on the famous watch used in the movie. Needless to say we were outbid. It would have been cool to own, evan if it was only a movie prop.

John
I know I have said this elsewhere, but it is always amazing how so many people jump on the "politically correct" bandwagon and point out the inaccuracies in the Errol Flynn movie (yes, there were many) and insist that "Little Big Man" was the epitome of accuracy (NO it wasn't) Part of the problem is that Errol Flynn's Custer comes off as heroic - and after the 1960's era - Custer was just too convenient as a villain for the politically correct crowd. (and not just Leftists). It was "chic" or "fashionable" to dislike Custer.
 

Kurt G

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I know I have said this elsewhere, but it is always amazing how so many people jump on the "politically correct" bandwagon and point out the inaccuracies in the Errol Flynn movie (yes, there were many) and insist that "Little Big Man" was the epitome of accuracy (NO it wasn't) Part of the problem is that Errol Flynn's Custer comes off as heroic - and after the 1960's era - Custer was just too convenient as a villain for the politically correct crowd. (and not just Leftists). It was "chic" or "fashionable" to dislike Custer.
I detest "Little Big man" , but I can't watch "They Died with their Boots On" without cringing. Custer saving the Union army at Gettysburg single handed , etc. I can chalk this up to old Hollywood movies that never let the truth get in the way of a good story. It still beats the worst one I remember called "The Santa Fe Trail" where Stuart and Custer are friends fighting together before the war .
 

mkyzzzrdet

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I detest "Little Big man" , but I can't watch "They Died with their Boots On" without cringing. Custer saving the Union army at Gettysburg single handed , etc. I can chalk this up to old Hollywood movies that never let the truth get in the way of a good story. It still beats the worst one I remember called "The Santa Fe Trail" where Stuart and Custer are friends fighting together before the war .
Yeah - "Santa Fe Trail" with Ronald Reagan as Custer! And Custer wasn't even AT the Harpers Ferry affair. Raymond Massey as John Brown wasn't too bad. Errol Flynn as Jeb Stuart - I have often wondered how good a Stuart he may have made in an actual movie set during the war? I guess we'll never know.
 

Cavalier

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For myself, when it comes to Hollywood movies I am only there for the entertainment. I like as much realism as I can get but I don't expect much from the movie business, and it's entertainment that is their business, or used to be. I know They Died With Their Boots On isn't very historic but I love it. I am a big fan of Errol Flynn movies and he was a great Custer, in my opinion. I also liked him in The Charge Of The Light Brigade.
 

Morrow7x

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I know I have said this elsewhere, but it is always amazing how so many people jump on the "politically correct" bandwagon and point out the inaccuracies in the Errol Flynn movie (yes, there were many) and insist that "Little Big Man" was the epitome of accuracy (NO it wasn't) Part of the problem is that Errol Flynn's Custer comes off as heroic - and after the 1960's era - Custer was just too convenient as a villain for the politically correct crowd. (and not just Leftists). It was "chic" or "fashionable" to dislike Custer.

And as much as I enjoy HBO's 'Deadwood', those writers couldn't resist a little Custer-bashing either...
 

MAJOR DUNDEE

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Custer is often depicted very badly in movies , in "Little Big Man" it's description is a shame, in that film his character is a victim of the time where the movie was made (1970).

Despite a lot of historical inaccuracies, "They died with their boots on" may be the best for portraying the Custer character has he could have been (Raoul Walsh never carred a lot for facts and details, just look at "Distant drums", the year is 1840, they use Springfields trapdoors and Colts 1873...as if WW2 GI's used M16 guns).

W23.jpg
 

Cavalier

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I agree that Flynn's portrayal of Custer might be the best, movie inaccuracies not withstanding. I really get a kick out of Sydney Greenstreet as General Scott too. If I remember correctly, and I didn't sit through the whole movie, Little Big Man portrays Custer as a coward. I thought that was disgusting.

John
 
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