Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Buckeye Bill

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On this day in 1876, Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer in a bloody battle near southern Montana's Little Bighorn River.

Entrance to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Museum

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Last Stand Hill Marker

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Last Stand Hill Monument

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Last Stand Hill Monument Plaque

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Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer's Grave Site (Body moved to the West Point Academy Cemetery)

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Grave Sites of the 7th U.S. Army Cavalry

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Grave Site of 7th U.S. Cavalry Horses

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Indian Encampment Site

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Delhi Rangers

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Joined
Nov 1, 2011
Location
Alabama
On this day in 1876, Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer in a bloody battle near southern Montana's Little Bighorn River.

Entrance to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Museum

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Last Stand Hill Marker

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Last Stand Hill Monument

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Last Stand Hill Monument Plaque

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Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer's Grave Site (Body moved to the West Point Academy Cemetery)

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Grave Sites of the 7th U.S. Army Cavalry

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Grave Site of 7th U.S. Cavalry Horses

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Indian Encampment Site

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William,
I have been there once. The landscape is so different than my native Alabama I thought that I had landed on an entirely different planet. Planning a trip now to go back out there and to Yellowstone again next summer God willing. Great pictures as usual!
 

Buckeye Bill

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Why does the site refer to Custer as General when his rank at the time he died was a Lt. Colonel?

After the American Civil War, Custer reverted back to the rank of captain and briefly considered leaving the military. He was offered the position of adjutant general in the Mexican army of Benito Juárez, who was then battling Emperor Maximilian, but was blocked from accepting it by the State Department. An advocate of President Andrew Johnson's reconstruction policy, he was criticized by hardliners who believed he was attempting to curry favor with the goal of receiving a promotion. In 1866, he turned down the colonelcy of the all-black 10th Cavalry (Buffalo Soldiers) in favor of the lieutenant colonelcy of the 7th Cavalry. History tends to mix-up facts about this infamous man.
 

dlofting

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Aug 13, 2013
Location
Vancouver, BC, Canada
Why does the site refer to Custer as General when his rank at the time he died was a Lt. Colonel?

The stone refers to him as a Brevet Major General, which he was, although he was a Lt. Colonel in the regular army. As an aside officers were often referred to by their brevet rank......sort of an honor thing......even though they were officially acting in a lesser capacity.
 
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