Links for those researching North Carolina Confederates

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Histories of the Several Regiments and Battalions from North Carolina in the Great War, 1861-1865, http://behind.aotw.org/2010/01/04/a-hypertoc-for-histories-of-the-several-regiments-and-battalions/

Moore's Roster of North Carolina troops in the War Between the States, http://behind.aotw.org/2009/12/22/a-hypertoc-for-moores-roster-of-north-carolina-troops/

Recently found this, never knew it was online !!! Thought I'd share, hope this was a good place to put it.

Merry Christmas all & God Bless !!!!
 

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nc11thwwmccall

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What a great link. I've just been looking at these sites and am excited to find them. Thanks for posting it. By the way,I think I saw on another post that you have ancestors from the Wilkes County area of NC. So do I, mostly Wilkes and Caldwell. I was born in Caldwell County and grew up in Burke. Would love to see if we have any connections.
 
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What a great link. I've just been looking at these sites and am excited to find them. Thanks for posting it. By the way,I think I saw on another post that you have ancestors from the Wilkes County area of NC. So do I, mostly Wilkes and Caldwell. I was born in Caldwell County and grew up in Burke. Would love to see if we have any connections.
What a great link. I've just been looking at these sites and am excited to find them. Thanks for posting it. By the way,I think I saw on another post that you have ancestors from the Wilkes County area of NC. So do I, mostly Wilkes and Caldwell. I was born in Caldwell County and grew up in Burke. Would love to see if we have any connections.
I've not been on this site for awhile and had to reset my password. Appreciate your post !!! I bet from your username: nc11th you have ancestors from the " Bethel Regiment." I'm sure you're very proud of them. I had several. Two were a 1st cousin 3 x removed, JOHN LAND and his brother-in-law, JORDAN LIVINGSTON. They were privates in company B. They were both captured while hospitalized in Richmond April 3, 1865. John was only a kid, born in 1846. He'd only been in since Nov.64. He was turned over to the Federal provost on the day of the Lincoln assassination. He never recovered from his wounds and died in Federal custody July 9, 1865, one week after taking the oath. My paternal roots are in Wilkes County with connections in Caldwell and Alexander. I've lived in East Tennessee all my life ( 64 yrs. ) My great-grandfather came here shortly after 1870. Has father was a " conscript " in the 13th NC. He went in Feb.14,1864 at Camp Vance. ( farmed, and had 6 children by the time the war started and was pushing 40 yrs old ) He was captured April 2nd 1865 when the Petersburg lines were broken. Held at Hart Island, New York till mid June 1865. I've got Rebel " TAR-HEELS " in my family tree from the 26th, 39th, 53rd, & 1st Infantry and probably others I can't recall just now !!! Being a native of East Tennessee I've got some " home-grown Yanks " also in my family tree. Look forward to hearing from you and about your ancestors !!!! Thanks again !!!!
 

dvrmte

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South Carolina
I highly recommend: " Covered With Glory : The 26th North Carolina Infantry at the Battle of Gettysburg " by Rod Gragg. A great read !!!!
I had two relatives in the 26th, Co. H, Bradly Brady and Henry Yow, that were wounded July 1st and captured. There two brother in laws in the same company were killed that day.
Too many books to read, not enough time!

PS- I have an East Tennessee Torie that was an ancestor. He served in the notoriously undisciplined 13th Tennessee Cavalry, Union.
 

dvrmte

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Had soldiers in the 48th and 15th NC from Union County
Small world ain't it?

Two of my relatives were killed by the same shot in the 48th.

http://www.sandersweb.net/CivilWar/48thNC.htm
From here we were on the memorable march to Richmond, and exposed to an awful heavy shelling on 25 May, near Hanover. The solid shot were falling and bouncing thick on the ground. The only casualties I remember were Sergeant C. Lawhon and Corporal M. C. Yow, Company D, Forty-eighth North Carolina, both killed with the same shot. Our next engagement was at a place called Turkey Bend, or Turkey Hill. Wilcox's Division was fighting in front of us, and a heavy body of Federals were moving on his left flank. We were preparing to meet them, throwing up some temporary breastworks under a sharp skirmish fire. Lieutenant W. C. Howard, of Company F, Forty-eighth, was killed. Some four or five men wounded, were, I think, all of those lost by the Forty-eighth in this engagement. The enemy was moving in-line of battle to our right. We were ordered to move in time and make no noise. While on this rapid march an amusing incident occurred, which I will relate: We were passing through a ravine where some Yankee prisoners were under guard. A very large, gruff looking Yankee was standing up slurring the rebels. He asked: "Why do you rebels wear such dirty, ragged clothes?" An Irishman by the name of Forrest, belonging to Company D, Forty-eighth Regiment, and as good a soldier as was in the regiment, answered: "Faith and be jabbers, we Southerners always put on our sorriest clothes when we kill hogs, and it is hog killing day with us now," pointing to a dead Yankee near by. This wit of the Irishman caused a laugh, and forgetting the order to be quiet, some two or three men raised a yell, which was taken up along the line a regular rebel yell. The enemy's lines halted, broke and fell back, so we did not get into any further engagement. Whether it was this yell that caused them to fall back, I cannot say, but I don't suppose they knew we were near them until the yell betrayed our whereabouts.
 
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I had two relatives in the 26th, Co. H, Bradly Brady and Henry Yow, that were wounded July 1st and captured. There two brother in laws in the same company were killed that day.
Too many books to read, not enough time!

PS- I have an East Tennessee Torie that was an ancestor. He served in the notoriously undisciplined 13th Tennessee Cavalry, Union.
In east Tennessee they were " home-grown yanks " I had several in the 1st Tenn.Cav., 8th Tenn. Cav. 3rd Tenn. mtd.Inf. In some counties there was more Union sentiment then Confederate. The area is still solid Republican on election day !!!
Probably always will be. My paternal grandmaw's grandfathers were Yankee pow's in Virginia. Neither came home alive. She was to the " far-right " of Barry Goldwater !!! LOL !!!
 

shanniereb

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Small world ain't it?

Two of my relatives were killed by the same shot in the 48th.

http://www.sandersweb.net/CivilWar/48thNC.htm
From here we were on the memorable march to Richmond, and exposed to an awful heavy shelling on 25 May, near Hanover. The solid shot were falling and bouncing thick on the ground. The only casualties I remember were Sergeant C. Lawhon and Corporal M. C. Yow, Company D, Forty-eighth North Carolina, both killed with the same shot. Our next engagement was at a place called Turkey Bend, or Turkey Hill. Wilcox's Division was fighting in front of us, and a heavy body of Federals were moving on his left flank. We were preparing to meet them, throwing up some temporary breastworks under a sharp skirmish fire. Lieutenant W. C. Howard, of Company F, Forty-eighth, was killed. Some four or five men wounded, were, I think, all of those lost by the Forty-eighth in this engagement. The enemy was moving in-line of battle to our right. We were ordered to move in time and make no noise. While on this rapid march an amusing incident occurred, which I will relate: We were passing through a ravine where some Yankee prisoners were under guard. A very large, gruff looking Yankee was standing up slurring the rebels. He asked: "Why do you rebels wear such dirty, ragged clothes?" An Irishman by the name of Forrest, belonging to Company D, Forty-eighth Regiment, and as good a soldier as was in the regiment, answered: "Faith and be jabbers, we Southerners always put on our sorriest clothes when we kill hogs, and it is hog killing day with us now," pointing to a dead Yankee near by. This wit of the Irishman caused a laugh, and forgetting the order to be quiet, some two or three men raised a yell, which was taken up along the line a regular rebel yell. The enemy's lines halted, broke and fell back, so we did not get into any further engagement. Whether it was this yell that caused them to fall back, I cannot say, but I don't suppose they knew we were near them until the yell betrayed our whereabouts.[/quote



Makes me feel as if I was there! :smile:
 

dvrmte

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In east Tennessee they were " home-grown yanks " I had several in the 1st Tenn.Cav., 8th Tenn. Cav. 3rd Tenn. mtd.Inf. In some counties there was more Union sentiment then Confederate. The area is still solid Republican on election day !!!
Probably always will be. My paternal grandmaw's grandfathers were Yankee pow's in Virginia. Neither came home alive. She was to the " far-right " of Barry Goldwater !!! LOL !!!
My ancestor from Tennessee was William Howard of Johnson County. My father said his father couldn't stand his in-laws, which were Howards. My father didn't know about his ancestor serving in the Union army until recently. He wondered if that had anything to do with the Howard's being so uppity and critical of everything outside of East Tennessee. The thing is that all of the people on my father's side were mountain people and all poor sustenance farmers. My research has shown no slaves in either group either. I guess each was isolated in their own way. They were from North Georgia, East Tennessee and Western North Carolina. In miles not that far apart. Every able bodied man of each of the other families joined the Confederate army between the summer of 61 and spring of 62. William Howard didn't sign up for the Union until 1863.

Another weird thing is that the 13th Tennessee US, which William Howard was a member of, came through the area where I now live in the spring of 1865. They sacked quite a few communities around here and performed some outrages, burned and pillaged, etc. It was a poorly disciplined unit.
 
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My ancestor from Tennessee was William Howard of Johnson County. My father said his father couldn't stand his in-laws, which were Howards. My father didn't know about his ancestor serving in the Union army until recently. He wondered if that had anything to do with the Howard's being so uppity and critical of everything outside of East Tennessee. The thing is that all of the people on my father's side were mountain people and all poor sustenance farmers. My research has shown no slaves in either group either. I guess each was isolated in their own way. They were from North Georgia, East Tennessee and Western North Carolina. In miles not that far apart. Every able bodied man of each of the other families joined the Confederate army between the summer of 61 and spring of 62. William Howard didn't sign up for the Union until 1863.

Another weird thing is that the 13th Tennessee US, which William Howard was a member of, came through the area where I now live in the spring of 1865. They sacked quite a few communities around here and performed some outrages, burned and pillaged, etc. It was a poorly disciplined unit.
I own a very old " History of the Union 13th Tenn. Cav. " I'm currently reading " Stoneman's Raid 1865 " bet that's what you're referring to ? My great-grandfather was the oldest of 6 siblings in Wilkes County at that time. Every bit 9-10 years old and " the man of the house " while his father was off fighting with the 13th NC. Terrible times in a dangerous place !!!! I bet he grew up fast !!!!
 

dvrmte

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I own a very old " History of the Union 13th Tenn. Cav. " I'm currently reading " Stoneman's Raid 1865 " bet that's what you're referring to ? My great-grandfather was the oldest of 6 siblings in Wilkes County at that time. Every bit 9-10 years old and " the man of the house " while his father was off fighting with the 13th NC. Terrible times in a dangerous place !!!! I bet he grew up fast !!!!
This paragraph is about all it says about the entire event.

On the 30th we crossed the Blue Ridge stopping on the summit at Caesar's Head to muster for pay. We were now in the Palmetto State, the first to secede from the Union and fire the first shot at the old flag and we did not at that time have many scruples about despoiling the country. We reached Anderson, S. C., May 1st, where we remained in camp all day the 2d; marched at dark that night, and stopped to feed at daylight on the morning of the 3d. At this place Gen. Palmer joined us with his brigade and the Thirteenth was detached and sent on in the direction of Athens, Ga.; marched until late in the afternoon, when we stopped and rested a few hours. Resuming the march we traveled all night, arriving at Athens early next morning, capturing 30o prisoners. That day Col. Stacy and staff took dinner with Gen. Reynolds, of the Confederate army. We marched at 2 P. M., reaching Lexington, Ga., where we camped for the night. Some of our men had done some looting at Athens, and after going into camp at Lexington the Regiment was called out, formed and every man searched; twenty-two watches were found, which were placed in the hands of Lieut. Honycutt, who was sent to Athens to deliver them to Gen. Palmer, to be returned to their owners. It is to be regretted that in every large number of troops, in time of war and the suspension of civil law, there are always some men who do dishonorable acts that bring discredit. upon the organization to which they belong.
These links give a better explanation of what went on from the South Carolinian's point of view.

http://mwyckoff.tripod.com/last.html

http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=8395

http://books.google.com/books?id=j2UbAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA83&lpg=PA83&dq=skirmish+cadets+williamston&source=bl&ots=66zMlsUmPi&sig=eqC9yKC3z62D6vVik-rNrZiWKcI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Bh68T6XZHISk8ATz3agz&ved=0CFQQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=skirmish cadets williamston&f=false page 88 briefly mentions it.
 

nc11thwwmccall

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I've not been on this site for awhile and had to reset my password. Appreciate your post !!! I bet from your username: nc11th you have ancestors from the " Bethel Regiment." I'm sure you're very proud of them. I had several. Two were a 1st cousin 3 x removed, JOHN LAND and his brother-in-law, JORDAN LIVINGSTON. They were privates in company B. They were both captured while hospitalized in Richmond April 3, 1865. John was only a kid, born in 1846. He'd only been in since Nov.64. He was turned over to the Federal provost on the day of the Lincoln assassination. He never recovered from his wounds and died in Federal custody July 9, 1865, one week after taking the oath. My paternal roots are in Wilkes County with connections in Caldwell and Alexander. I've lived in East Tennessee all my life ( 64 yrs. ) My great-grandfather came here shortly after 1870. Has father was a " conscript " in the 13th NC. He went in Feb.14,1864 at Camp Vance. ( farmed, and had 6 children by the time the war started and was pushing 40 yrs old ) He was captured April 2nd 1865 when the Petersburg lines were broken. Held at Hart Island, New York till mid June 1865. I've got Rebel " TAR-HEELS " in my family tree from the 26th, 39th, 53rd, & 1st Infantry and probably others I can't recall just now !!! Being a native of East Tennessee I've got some " home-grown Yanks " also in my family tree. Look forward to hearing from you and about your ancestors !!!! Thanks again !!!!
I've not been on in a while either! So glad to hear your response. Yes, my ancestor W.W. McCall, fought in Company B of the 11th. He volunteered in the spring of '62 and was discharged in the spring of '64 due to illness. I'm amazed that he didn't die of it since so many did. I also have ancestors in other regiments, including the 26th. I've also got a couple of direct ancestors from Wilkes and Caldwell who died as prisoners up North and are buried there. I live in eastern NC presently, but the hills of western NC will always be home to me.
 
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I've not been on in a while either! So glad to hear your response. Yes, my ancestor W.W. McCall, fought in Company B of the 11th. He volunteered in the spring of '62 and was discharged in the spring of '64 due to illness. I'm amazed that he didn't die of it since so many did. I also have ancestors in other regiments, including the 26th. I've also got a couple of direct ancestors from Wilkes and Caldwell who died as prisoners up North and are buried there. I live in eastern NC presently, but the hills of western NC will always be home to me.
Sounds like we have much in common !!! The mountains are beautiful !!! God's country indeed !!! I can recall making weekend family trips to Grandfather Mountain as a little kid in the 50's. Everyone was long-gone by that time who had any knowledge of our roots in the " Old North State. " I've been researching my Civil War ancestors since the late 1980's. I just made a post you might want to see on the first Confederate casualty of the war. Private Henry Lawson Wyatt of Co. A 1st NC. volunteers. Killed at Big Bethel, Va. The 1st eventually became the 11th ( Bethel ) regiment. I've some east Tennessee veterans on both sides that died as pow's. Like I said, a lot in common.
 


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