Ami's SOA Lincoln Quote of the Day


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" In this age, and in this country, public sentiment is everything. With it, nothing can fail; against it, nothing can succeed. Whoever molds public sentiment goes deeper than he who enacts statutes or pronounces judicial decisions. He makes possible the enforcement of them, else impossible.”– Notes for Speeches, circa October 1858
 

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" I made a point of honor and conscience in all things to stick to my word, especially if others had been inducted to act upon it.”– Letter to Mrs. Eliza Browning, April 1, 1838
 

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" I would save the Union. I would save it the shortest way under the Constitution. The sooner the national authority can be restored; the nearer the Union will be ‘the Union as it was.'”– Letter to Horace Greeley, August 22, 1862
 

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" Truth is generally the best vindication against slander.”– Remark made when requested to dismiss Montgomery Blair, Postmaster-General, September 1864
 

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" Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed. Consequently he who molds public sentiment goes deeper than he who enacts statutes or pronounces decisions.”– Lincoln-Douglas Debate at Ottawa, August 21, 1858
 

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" Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong.”– Speech at Peoria, Illinois, October 16, 1854
 

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" I am rather inclined to silence, and whether that be wise or not, it is at least more unusual nowadays to find a man who can hold his tongue than to find one who cannot.”– Remarks at the Monogahela House, February 14, 1861
 

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" Let us neither express nor cherish any hard feelings toward any citizen who by his vote has differed with us. Let us at all times remember that all American citizens are brothers of a common country, and should dwell together in the bonds of fraternal feeling.”– Remarks at Springfield, November 20, 1860
 

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"Nor is it any argument that we are superior and the negro inferior—that he has but one talent while we have ten. Let the negro possess the little he has in independence ; if he has but one talent, he should be permitted to keep the little he has."

Speech Delivered at the First Republican State Convention of Illinois, Held at Bloomington. May 29, 1856.*

* This is the famous "Lost Speech" of Lincoln which aroused such interest among the auditors that even the news reporters sat spell-bound, and neglected to take notes. However, Henry C, Whitney, a lav/yer of Chicago, who was present, made long-hand notes of
the address
Source: Life and Works of Abraham Lincoln, Vol III, p 282, Henry C. Whitney

Respectfully,
William

One Nation,
Two countries
Confed-American Flag - Thumbnail.jpg
 

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"Nor is it any argument that we are superior and the negro inferior—that he has but one talent while we have ten. Let the negro possess the little he has in independence ; if he has but one talent, he should be permitted to keep the little he has."

Speech Delivered at the First Republican State Convention of Illinois, Held at Bloomington. May 29, 1856.*

* This is the famous "Lost Speech" of Lincoln which aroused such interest among the auditors that even the news reporters sat spell-bound, and neglected to take notes. However, Henry C, Whitney, a lav/yer of Chicago, who was present, made long-hand notes of
the address
Source: Life and Works of Abraham Lincoln, Vol III, p 282, Henry C. Whitney

Respectfully,
William

One Nation,
Two countries
View attachment 313527
The above notes and book of the author mentioned have been debunked.

Search: Lincoln's lost speech for the story.

Unionblue

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