Lincoln and the Thirteenth Amendment by Christian G. Samito Tells the Real Story Behind the Movie

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The New Jersey debates reveals other aspects: for Northern Democrats, dumping slavery by supporting the amendment was a way to get right with Union victory, despite their criticism of the Republicans. Slavery was a "dead carcass" anyway, and cutting themselves free of it was politically advantageous.

One anti amendment politician grumbled about how Lincoln started with saying "n-gger" like everyone(white) else, then eventually moved by stages to talking about "American citizens of African descent." A bad thing in the politician's mind, but of course, not for us. Actually he had a pretty good description of Lincoln's thinking.
 

Pat Young

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Close analysis of the very concept of using the amendment process in the 19th century. Lincoln was reluctant to make any permanent change in the Constitution at all, on any issue, at first.

That was the part of the book I had the least prior familiarity with.
 

Pat Young

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Ratification sailed into the seas of conflicting versions of Reconstruction: did the rebel states "commit suicide" and have to be reconstituted by the Congress, or, in Lincoln's view, had they never left the Union, and therefore had to be part of ratification?
Yes, the legal questions concerning ratification were interesting. Considering there were only two amendments ratified over the previous seven decades, there was not a lot of precedent for unusual situations.
 

War Horse

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