Lincoln and Colonization

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Lincoln during this period seemed to personally favor and toy with colonization, Lincoln the politician dropped it when it didn't have support.

Did it have merit? Would assume it would depend on how one views the alternatives and historical outcome. But you see some claiming 150 years of "oppression" that they claim continues even today in the US, if so wouldn't colonization perhaps been a better alternative?

Know some American and Canadian ex slaves did colonize to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Is their any books/studies on the colonies outcomes and how the colonization is viewed by their descendants today?
 

unionblue

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Lincoln during this period seemed to personally favor and toy with colonization, Lincoln the politician dropped it when it didn't have support.

Did it have merit? Would assume it would depend on how one views the alternatives and historical outcome. But you see some claiming 150 years of "oppression" that they claim continues even today in the US, if so wouldn't colonization perhaps been a better alternative?

Know some American and Canadian ex slaves did colonize to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Is their any books/studies on the colonies outcomes and how the colonization is viewed by their descendants today?
Before answering this question, shouldn't it be taken into consideration the logistics of transporting nearly 4 million people back to Africa via the available ships available to the United States? And some of these millions had no desire to make such a trip?
 
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Before answering this question, shouldn't it be taken into consideration the logistics of transporting nearly 4 million people back to Africa via the available ships available to the United States? And some of these millions had no desire to make such a trip?
Well I suppose one would also need to calculate the costs of Freedman's bureau, assistance to ex slaves, and of a decade of military occupation during reconstruction also in comparison, if looking at economic costs of policies to compare.

During the period Lincoln was considering it, the majority of those millions were not US citizens. So realistically how would they be exempt if US had decided on a deportation policy?

But the actual op would be if one seriously believes being free here in the US has been 150 years of oppression that still continues today......how could not colonisation be considered possibly a preferential alternative if it had been carried out, as they suggest the historical course was an utter failure in their opinion, if they honestly believe oppression continues to this day.

Generally doesn't the worse the outcome, lead to revaluating other options that may have lead to better outcomes?
 
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During the period Lincoln was considering it, the majority of those millions were not US citizens. So realistically how would they be exempt if US had decided on a deportation policy?
Just a minor quibble here. All free Blacks in the entire country were considered U.S. citizens as of November 29, 1862 per USAG Edward Bates' written legal opinion, which remained uncontested in the courts.
 
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Just a minor quibble here. All free Blacks in the entire country were considered U.S. citizens as of November 29, 1862 per USAG Edward Bates' written legal opinion, which remained uncontested in the courts.
Generally it's not considered established law from historians I've read till 14th amendment.

But the OP goes to if reconstruction is considered a failure by virtually all historians, to some to the extent they claim of continued oppression to this day, shouldn't it invite serious discussion of what were period alternatives?

Like if one says attacking center day three at Gettysburg was a failure, which means it was a failure of Lee's judgement and policy, it then opens suggestions of possible preferential alternatives from doing nothing to attacking elsewhere.
 
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The treatment of reconstruction has always struck me bizarre in that the general consensus is it was a failure. Yet there's little criticism for implementing what were failed policies or in examining alternatives, it's presented essentially as if it was simply bound to fail....which if the case, implementing policies bound to fail should deserve criticism realistically, as the goal should be and have been realistically sustainable policies.
 
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RobertP

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Lincoln during this period seemed to personally favor and toy with colonization, Lincoln the politician dropped it when it didn't have support.

Did it have merit? Would assume it would depend on how one views the alternatives and historical outcome. But you see some claiming 150 years of "oppression" that they claim continues even today in the US, if so wouldn't colonization perhaps been a better alternative?

Know some American and Canadian ex slaves did colonize to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Is their any books/studies on the colonies outcomes and how the colonization is viewed by their descendants today?
After Muhammad Ali’s 1974 “Rumble in the Jungle” in Zaire vs George Foreman he was quoted as saying “thank God my granddaddy got on that boat.” As bad as life was for negroes in this country most probably thought it could be worse.
 
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Indeed would say the claim of oppression, especially to this day isn't a universal view.

I certainly believe everyone today and through history, regardless of race has encountered discrimination and profiling, but that doesn't equate oppression. For example there's been videos showing the difference sending "traditionally attractive" people into stores or interviews, then sending in overweight people. Treatment is not universally the same.

Just as a teenager I got pulled over sometimes on fri or sat nite for little more then being a teenager out on fri or sat, even as I got older experienced being pulled over when I suspect if I hadn't been in a sports car I wouldn't been.......would seem I have been profiled as well.

Oppression would be official policy by business or an agency which I doubt exists to any degree......however certainly individual officers, store managers, ect certainly have their own views based on age/race/appearance/ect and experiences.
 
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jackt62

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Lincoln and many others of his time, believed that colonization and emancipation went hand in hand. That belief was rooted in the fact that because enslaved Blacks had been forcibly transported to America, the natural condition would be to "repatriate" them to Africa (or Central America) after release from bondage. But Lincoln came to revise his mindset about colonization after realizing that the enormous contribution made by Black enlistees in the Union ranks showed that the enslaved population were just as "American" as any white person, and that any bygone relationship to Africa was just as distant as that of a white person to the land their ancestors emigrated from. That's not to overlook the influence of Frederick Douglass on Lincoln's thinking, and the resistance to any colonization plan from almost everyone, white or black, that were contributing factors in Lincoln's view.
 

tcox009

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Know some American and Canadian ex slaves did colonize to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Is their any books/studies on the colonies outcomes and how the colonization is viewed by their descendants today?

The descendants of the American slaves, Americo-Liberians, ruled Liberia from 1848, as a small minority of the total population up until a military coup in 1980. Followed by on again off again civil war until 2003. The result was many Americo-Liberians fled the country and their political control of the country ceased.
 

lurid

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Thomas Jefferson thought colonization was a practical alternative. He thought free blacks would lead to a race war. Quite plausible.
 
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According to Ben Butler Lincoln was still promoting colonization in the days leading up to his assassination.
As I said one thing Lincoln was is a rather consummate politician, and certainly capable of subordinating his personal beliefs to fit the climate as he gauged it, or for political gain.
 

RobertP

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Know some American and Canadian ex slaves did colonize to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Is their any books/studies on the colonies outcomes and how the colonization is viewed by their descendants today?

The descendants of the American slaves, Americo-Liberians, ruled Liberia from 1848, as a small minority of the total population up until a military coup in 1980. Followed by on again off again civil war until 2003. The result was many Americo-Liberians fled the country and their political control of the country ceased.
Sounds like Jackson, Mississippi today.
 

19thGeorgia

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Just a minor quibble here. All free Blacks in the entire country were considered U.S. citizens as of November 29, 1862 per USAG Edward Bates' written legal opinion, which remained uncontested in the courts.
-Though not given much credence. Northern states still had black codes and slavery still existed within the Union. A newspaper which supported Bates' opinion stated "it should be borne in mind that the Dred Scott decision has never been reversed" (Free South, Beaufort, SC, August 29, 1863).
 
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The topic is more of a "what if," or "I only wish," theory, instead of facing what is now history.
Again odd, that other policy that is deemed a colossal failure, alternatives are usually examined. Its what is generally done in probably the majority of threads here........as to criticize something a failure, generally suggests perhaps other courses or policy could led to more favorable results.
 

unionblue

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The topic is more of a "what if," or "I only wish," theory, instead of facing what is now history.
Again odd, that other policy that is deemed a colossal failure, alternatives are usually examined. Its what is generally done in probably the majority of threads here........as to criticize something a failure, generally suggests perhaps other courses or policy could led to more favorable results.
To some it may seem such.

To others, Monday night quarterbacking.
 
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