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Authentic Lima Beans

Discussion in 'Foods of the Civil War' started by donna, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    lima.jpg

    My husband loves Lima Beans so thought find old recipe for them. This recipe from "The Kentucky Housewife" by Lettice Bryan, 1839.

    Lima Beans., removed from shells. These beans are very fine, and should be full grown, but quite tender. Having shelled them, rinse them in cold water and boil them till soft, throwing in a small handful of salt; drain and serve them, and pat over them pepper and melted butter.
     
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  3. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Lima beans are so good - succotash and soup! And, you've reminded me of butter beans - those are so good. Had a grocer try to tell me a butter bean and a lima bean were the same but I strongly disagree. (Don't believe a sweet tater and a yam are the same, either!)
     
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  4. truthckr

    truthckr 2nd Lieutenant

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    Whew, another childhood memory; cubed steak in mushroom soup gravy with mashed taters and lima beans. Except for pan fried chicken on Sundays, it didn't get much better than that.
     
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  5. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    My SC granny put stewed tomatoes and okra with the lima beans. I remember her making this a couple times. She made creamed butter beans that had ham bits in it and went especially well with pork chops. Granny never wrote any of these recipes down, though! Remember the lima beans and okra was a little hot. Sure wish I'd been old enough to pay more attention to how she made stuff. :cry:
     
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  6. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Ever since diane brought up what is difference in Lima Beans and Butter Beans, have been reading all kinds of material on the subject.

    It seems from all I have read that all foods have multiple names. Butter Beans is the other name for Lima Beans. There are two common varieties of lima beans, the baby lima bean and the Fordhook lima bean. Although often confused, they are the same bean in different stages of development.

    Fordhook lima beans are commonly called butter beans.

    It is interesting that these large beans are called butter beans or Madagascar beans in Europe. Most limas sold in Europe come from Madagascar (or Mauritius).
     
  7. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    One of our favorite vegetable dishes is Succotash. Here is recipe my grandmother liked from her favorite cookbook, "The American Woman's Cook Book", edited by Ruth Berolzheimer, 1946.

    Succotash

    2 cups green corn or 1 cup dried corn
    2 cups fresh Lima, string or butter beans or 1 cup dried Lima beans
    Salt and pepper
    1 cup milk
    4 tablespoons butter

    If fresh vegetables are used, cut the corn from the cob. Cover the beans with the least possible amount of boiling water, to prevent scorching, and cook until tender. Drain off the water, add the corn and the milk and cook slowly until the corn is tender. Add the butter and other seasoning.

    When dried corn and beans are used, soak both separately over night. In the morning, cover the beans with fresh water, and boil them very gently until tender. Do not drain the water from the corn, but reduce heat so it will cook slowly. When the beans are tender, drain and add them to the corn, allowing only water enough to cover. cook slowly until tender and drain off the water to save for soup. Add the milk and seasoning.
     
  8. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    From the Cookbook, "The Frugal Gourmet" by Jeff Smith:

    Misaquatash (American Indian)

    This is the original dish from which we get the term succotash.

    Here is Smith's recreated recipe:

    1 16 ounce can kidney beans, drained
    1 10 ounce package frozen corn
    butter
    salt and pepper to taste

    Cook the kidney beans and corn together. Smith states, "originally bear grease was added to this dish, but I suggest a little butter, salt, and pepper".

    From" "The Frugal Gourmet" by Jeff Smith, Ballantine Books, New York, 1984, page 333.
     
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  9. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    The first post on recipe for Lima Beans is authentic. It from 1839 cookbook.

    The others mentioned in the thread are recreated or modern
     
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  10. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Lima Beans were mentioned, so thought bring this thread up . We love lima beans in this family.
     
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  11. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    The only good Lima bean is one that is NOT on my plate!:dance:
     
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  12. TinCan

    TinCan Captain Forum Host

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    Sad to say but of all the great things donna and diane have brought to these pages that make your mouth water, for me, I have to draw the line at lima beans. Never did like em, probably because they were a staple at my grandmothers table. They are the only beans I never did care for.
     
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  13. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    Same with me. If I'm alone and to lazy to cook, I will sometimes open a can of mixed beans, dump some sauce on it and heat it up, devour the whole thing. But Lima's? I pick them out.
     
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  14. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    I know several of you hate Lima Beans but like bacon. Try this recipe:

    "Special Lima Beans"

    4 slices of bacon
    1/2 cup water
    1 clove garlic, chopped or crushed
    1 inch sprig fresh or 1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
    1 quart fresh or frozen lima beans
    1/4 cup grated cheese

    Fry bacon in a small skillet. Remove when crisp and drain on paper towel. Put the bacon fat, water, garlic, oregano, salt, and pepper in a 1 1/2 quart saucepan with a lid and bring to a boil. Simmer one minute. Add the lima beans. Cover and cook on medium heat approximately 6 minutes. if fresh, 5 minutes if frozen, until tender. Do not overcook. Serve in heated dish, topped with the grated cheese.

    From: "Betty Groff's Country Goodness Cookbook".
     
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  15. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    That would probably be really good, without the Lima beans (and the water) Ppttooie!:giggle:
     
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  16. OldGreyMare

    OldGreyMare Corporal

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    That sounds delicious. Will have to try.
     
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  17. JerseyBart

    JerseyBart Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    I love Lima beans: steamed or boiled and sprinkled with butter or salt and pepper. I could eat an entire bag full.
     
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  18. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    :sick::eek:
     
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  19. OldGreyMare

    OldGreyMare Corporal

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    Just try one little bite NL -- just one bite and you can have dessert!
     
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  20. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Found another lima bean recipe to try. This one is Tomatoes and Lima Beans.

    4 tomatoes
    1 1/2 cups lima beans, cooked
    1 tablespoon parsley
    2 tablespoons onions, grated
    1/2 cup nuts. chopped fine
    2 tablespoons celery, minced
    salt and pepper to taste
    French dressing

    Cut a slice from the top of the tomato and remove pulp with a spoon. Mix beans, parsley, onion, nuts and celery with the French Dressing to moisten. Fill tomatoes with the mixture and chill. Serve with more dressing. If you prefer, you can just slice the tomatoes thickly and pile mixture on top.

    Recipe from my aunt.
     
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  21. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Homemade French Dressing for the Tomatoes and Lima Bean Salad

    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon paprika
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1 teaspoon prepared mustard
    4 tablespoons olive oil
    1 1/2 tablespoons vinegar

    In a shallow dish, mix, salt, pepper and paprika. Add mustard and oil. Stir well to mix. Add the vinegar a little at a time, beating the mixture with a fork. Serve as soon as it mixed well.
     

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