Lillard's Mill

larry_cockerham

Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
10,198
Location
Nashville
#1
After a very enjoyable visit to the 2006 Forrest Boyhood Home fundraiser, I ventured south a few miles down TN highway 272 in search of the Duck River. After asking for directions to any access to the river (that was painful, the part about asking directions) I was guided to an eroded earthen ramp down the hill to the mighty Duck. This river was a very formidable obstacle for both Thomas' and Hood's armies in middle Tennessee, particulary in the winter months and specifically after the battle of Nashville. I walked down to the riverside and missed an opportunity to photograph a herron on a sand bar in front of me. I finally noticed a roaring sound and looked back to my right behind a tree line and saw the mill remnant and dam, still being warmed by the Tennessee sun after 141 years! Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest and some 3,500 men and animals tried to cross the ran swollen Duck at this point on December 18, 1864. My wounded great great grandfather was in the group. For an instant I could feel the spirit. This crossing on the Duck is mentioned in the OR and in many officer's reports. Thanks to topozone and a kind neighbor I was able to get some photographs and a very good memory. Any of you know about this place?
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

larry_cockerham

Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
10,198
Location
Nashville
#2
more milling around

Lillard's flour mill and general store are mentioned in the 1886 Goodspeed's History of Tennessee. The remant dwellings from a small milltown sit near the south bank of the river. The Lillard family cemetery is on a small knoll just south of that. I wrote the following:

Forrest’s wagon train at Triune included 400 prisoners, 100 head of cattle, 400 hogs along with sick and wounded soldiers. I suspect the recovering Pvt. Whitfield Monroe Parker owed his life to Forrest. Whit must have been at Lillard’s Mill on December 17, 1864 where half the train was able to cross the quickly rising Duck River. In Goodspeeds’ 1886 History of Tennessee, was found the following:

Rich Creek, located between Chapel Hill and Farmington, has two merchants--J. W. Boren and D. A. Reavis. There are several country stores in the county known by the following names: Robinson Fork, New Hope, Lunn's Store, Beasley, Delina, Lillard's Mills and Cochran's Mill. The mill at the last mentioned place was built by Levi Cochran. It is a saw and grist-mill. Lillard's is a flouring-mill. [Lillard’s Mill is now on the national register of historic places, but for the hydro-electric mill built in the 1920s, the remnant of which still stands.] The river bends and widens at this site and is relatively low terrain for easy access. Forrest knew where he was, having grown to man-hood just a few miles north.
 
Joined
Mar 29, 2006
Messages
108
Location
Houston, Tx
#3
Larry,
I'll be doing my greater Nashville trip in the next few weeks and I was hoping to get a little guidance from you as it relates to my intended CW trek SE from there for a couple days. Is the region bordering say Triune and Murfreesboro to the north working say southeast through the Highland Rim and the Barrens to Tullahoma still well preserved for CW touring and NPS parks? I think time will allow only for going as far south as Tullahoma. Anything further south through the Cumberland Plateau will have to wait for another trip I'am afraid. Thus:
1. What are must see spots in the region with say a span of two days?
2. Do the old AOT Tullahoma works still exist or have they not been
adequately preserved?
Any insight from you or others would be very much appreciated.

Respectfully,
Spartan
 
Joined
Mar 29, 2006
Messages
108
Location
Houston, Tx
#4
Subsequent to my last message, I did stumble on the detailed work in last year's TENNESSEE CIVIL WAR SITES thread which obviously contains a wealth of knowledge. Belated thanks to Scone in particular,and to Larry and others who contributed during that period. Should there be anything new to update and advise on, I welcome your comments. Now just have to narrow things down to the area of operations I am limited by time to visit.
Respectfully,
Spartan
 
Joined
May 24, 2006
Messages
78
Location
Murfreesboro, TN
#5
Tullahoma Campaign

Here is a we site that gives details on the driving tour of the Tullahoma Campaign,

http://www.tennesseebackroads.org/civil_war.htm

However, if your time is limited I would start out at Stones River NB or at Franklin. Either of these should have the good driving map that you can get. But many of the sites are just roadside markers. Wartrace is building a park, but that is basically it.

What I would do is stay around Murfreesboro, Franklin and Nashville if you haven't done these before. Then branch out from there.

If you have anymore questions just email me.
 

larry_cockerham

Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
10,198
Location
Nashville
#6
Jason is quite correct. The major sites are Franklin, Nashville, and Murfreesboro all thirty minutes drive in a triangle. Next in priority and perhaps both better presented are Chattanooga (Chickamauga) and Shiloh. Problem with those two is their distance from Nashville. Couple of hours or more each.
 


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top