Lieutenant Wolfe, 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry

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Lubliner

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I have spent the last couple days researching, beginning with "Harlan's Light Cavalry" in it's formation at Philadelphia in August of '61.
The command was present at Five Forks where Lieut. Wolfe was briefly captured, but reclaimed by his troops, who pursued, driving the enemy forward. Under Sheridan's drive when the U. S. Army swung around and cut off the rebels at Appomattox, the same detail on the last battle of the 8th instant, was led by the 11th. They were mustered out in August after 4 years, 1861-1865.
I begin at Camp Palmer. Can anyone include roster sheets when this regiment was the 108th at Philadelphia and organized by direction of Josiah Harlan with the authority of the Secretary of War in Washington, please?
Lubliner.
 

Lubliner

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OR Series 1, Volume IX, page 15, shows the returns for January 31, 1862 for the Department of Virginia, commanded by Major General John E. Wool. Along with various other regiments I shall name, the 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry was stationed at Camp Hamilton, across Mill Creek near Fort Monroe. These were under the command of Colonel Max Weber of the 20th New York;
1st Delaware.
20th New York.
99th New York, with six companies.
16th Massachusetts.
20th Indiana.
Mounted Rifles, with four companies.

The returns list no artillery present at the Camp.
Present for duty; 164 Officers / Men 4,365.

Lubliner.
 

Lubliner

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This averages up to 1 officer for every 26.6 corporals and privates with the additional 1/3 being the sergeant.
Two Lieutenants and a Captain, with the higher ranks of Major and Lieutenant Colonel, and staff officers.
The cavalry regiment had special order assignments for picketing and scouting while camped near Fort Monroe.
It remained there until May of '62, and so witnessed the fight between the two ironclads.
I would like to return to Philadelphia and fill out the foundation of this regiment, given time to find solid enough resources.
It has been written that later in the war during '64 the extreme marching movements of a distance of 500 miles and returning after a battle north of Richmond were done in record time.

Now is the irony I shall stumble upon a regimental history A-Z with all my work done ahead of me. Oh well! Que sera, sera.

Lubliner.
 
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I have spent the last couple days researching, beginning with "Harlan's Light Cavalry" in it's formation at Philadelphia in August of '61.
The command was present at Five Forks where Lieut. Wolfe was briefly captured, but reclaimed by his troops, who pursued, driving the enemy forward. Under Sheridan's drive when the U. S. Army swung around and cut off the rebels at Appomattox, the same detail on the last battle of the 8th instant, was led by the 11th. They were mustered out in August after 4 years, 1861-1865.
I begin at Camp Palmer. Can anyone include roster sheets when this regiment was the 108th at Philadelphia and organized by direction of Josiah Harlan with the authority of the Secretary of War in Washington, please?
Lubliner.
Report of Lieut. Col. Franklin A. Stratton, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry.

HDQRS. ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY,
Near Richmond, Va., April 29, 1865.
SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of operations of this
regiment during the late campaign:

Breaking up the winter's camp on the north side of the James on the
evening of the 28th of March, the command during the night crossing
the James at Varina and the Appomattox at Point of Rocks, moved to
the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, in the rear of the lines of the
Army of the Potomac. The following day the regiment proceeded to
Reams' Station, at which point it remained, with the division, until 3
o'clock on the morning of the 1st of April, when the march was
resumed. The command proceeded to Dinwiddie Court-House and from
there took the road leading into the White Oak road, the Eleventh
Pennsylvania Cavalry, having the advance. At 1 p.m., about half a mile
from the White Oak road, we struck the enemy's pickets, and pushing
on soon developed a considerable force strongly posted in rifle-pits in
the edge of a wood along the road named, with an open field in their
front. Maj. McFarlan, commanding the advance battalion, deployed
Capt. Menzies' squadron (Companies G and H) on the right and left
of the road, mounted, and Capt. Elliott's squadron (Companies F and
B) farther to the right and left, in the woods, dismounted. The
remaining six companies were then ordered up under Maj. Skelley,
temporarily in command of the regiment, to support the advance
battalion. As soon as formed, about a quarter of a mile from the
enemy's line, Maj. Monroe, with two squadrons (Companies A, E, K
and C), was directed to charge the enemy's position, which was
promptly done, the general commanding the division charging at the
head of the column. The squadrons moved at first on the left of the
road, and then crossing it obliquely struck the left of the enemy's
position, charging over the works into the road and driving the enemy
out in confusion; meantime Lieut. Meekins, with Company I, had dislodged
the left of the enemy's line, and Capt. Ring, with part of his company,
gallantly charged the enemy for a considerable distance along the
White Oak road to the left. Capt. Elliott pushed his dismounted men
rapidly across the road into the wood, driving the enemy for some
distance. Maj. Skelley supported the attack with Capt. Nimmon's
squadron (Companies D and M), moving up at a gallop on the right of
the line. The rebels were completely dispersed at every point. Their
number, as afterward ascertained, was 600, double the number of my regiment.

We have to mourn the loss in this charge of Maj. Monroe and
Lieut. Mathews, mortally wounded, and Capt. Lancaster, killed,
all brave and gallant officers, who fell gloriously while leading their
men to the attack. Lieut. Wolfe was taken prisoner, having pushed
out too far on the left. Our loss otherwise was not heavy.

The command during the afternoon took part with the Fifth Corps in its
right flank movement at the Five Forks which resulted so disastrously
to the enemy. A considerable number of prisoners were captured by the
regiment and turned over to the infantry.

The regiment moved with the division on the 2d, 3d, and 4th to the
vicinity of Amelia Court-House. At Deep Creek we attacked the rebel
rear guard, strongly posted, and after half an hour's skirmishing drove
them out with considerable loss, having only one man wounded on our
side. On the 4th, upon nearing the Court-House, Maj. McFarlan,
commanding the advance battalion, met and charged the enemy's cavalry
outposts, driving their skirmish line back upon their infantry support. He
was followed up in the charge by the remainder of the regiment, which
was ordered forward by Col. Evans, commanding the brigade. Only
two or three men were lost. The next day I supported the First
Maryland Cavalry in its attack on the enemy at the railroad, to the left
of the Court-House. Two or three men were slightly wounded in this
affair. Moving thence, via Burkeville, to Prince Edward Court-House,
on the 7th, we there, in conjunction with Maj. Baker's battalion,
captured a considerable number of rebels, including one or two officers.
the following day we marched to the vicinity of Appomattox Station, on
the South Side Railroad, and on the morning of the 9th moved out to the
main road from Appomattox Court-House to Lynchburg, about a mile
westerly from the Court-House, this regiment having the advance.
Capt. Nimmon's squadron was deployed, dismounted, and pushed
across the road to develop the enemy's position. I moved the remainder
of the regiment into the wood on the left, dismounting four companies,
under Maj. Skelley, holding Capt. Nimmon commenced skirmishing
I discovered the enemy pushing out about a brigade of infantry from the
wood on our right and moving down the slope at right angles with our
line. Changing from to the right, I opened fire with some effect, but
receiving orders in a few minutes to fall back retired slowly to deploy
again, about 200 yards in front of the road, to protect the left flank,
which I did. Capt. Ring's squadron and one squadron under
Lieut. Cook were formed in line on the main road to repel the
enemy, who were following closely our dismounted men, retiring under
their orders to fall back. The enemy's cavalry being reported moving to
our left and rear, I sent Maj. McFarlan to move the led horses as his
judgment might direct for their safety. This duty he creditably performed,
and afterward had the horses ready for mounting as soon as wanted by me.

While affairs were in this position Davies' brigade, dismounted, aided
by our dismounted men, repelled the attack of the enemy on this road.
At this moment some of the rebel cavalry dashed in upon our rear, and
were met and checked by such men as could be brought up in time.
Almost at the same time our infantry, a part of the Twenty-fourth
Corps, advanced in line from the woods in our rear, sweeping back the
head of the column of rebel cavalry, and pushing beyond us toward the
Court-House soon left us in the rear. During this cavalry attack Capt.
Ring made a dashing charge on a superior force of cavalry in our rear
with some effect, although I had no men at hand mounted to support
him. Receiving orders to mount the regiment I did so without delay,
and, under orders, moved down the road about a mile westerly to meet
the rebel cavalry, thee posted across the road. Before any decisive
operations were commenced at this point orders to suspend hostilities
were received. Although a portion of the engagement was quite sharp
this morning I lost but one man killed and three or four wounded.

From this place, on the evening of the 9th, I detached Capt. Elliott's
squadron to search for artillery supposed to be abandoned by the enemy
in the vicinity of Red Oak Church. A copy of his report has already
been forwarded, from which it will be seen that he captured 60 prisoners,
54 pieces of field artillery, 36 gun carriages and caissons, and 1 battle-flag.

On the 12th the command marched to Lynchburg and occupied the town
about 4 p.m. Upon entering the place I received orders to take command
of the troops in the place, consisting of the Eleventh Pennsylvania
Cavalry and Maj. Baker's battalion, and to take possession of and
destroy all public property. These orders were carried out as far as
possible during the evening. The next day I turned over the command
and the captured property to Lieut.-Col. Potter, of Gen.
Turner's division, of the Twenty-fourth Corps. Very large amounts of
military stores were found here, comprising ordnance and ordnance
stores of every kind, quartermaster's property, a large amount of
subsistence stores, 25 locomotives, many cars, and much other railroad
property, and much property of a miscellaneous nature. This property
was all turned over by me to Lieut.-Col. Potter as stated. I
found here 56 field pieces, 6 heavy guns, 41 mortars, 7 forges, 75
caissons and gun carriages, 15,000 muskets, several hundred sabers, and
a large quantity of ammunition.

Including the guns, &c., captured on the 9th, at Red Oak Church, the
Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry has captured and taken possession of and
delivered to the proper officers 110 field pieces, 41 mortars, 6 heavy
guns, 111 caissons and carriages, a large amount of ordnance stores, 1
battle-flag, and many prisoners.

Leaving Lynchburg on the 16th the regiment marched with the brigade
to Burkeville, and thence, via Goode's Bridge, to Richmond, at which
place it arrived on the 24th instant.

I cannot speak too highly of the soldierly conduct of both officers and
men of the regiment during this brief campaign. I have heretofore
recommended several officers for promotion and others as deserving
honorable mention, but their service, under the eye of the commanding
general, has enabled him to judge of their merits.

FRANKLIN A. STRATTON,
Lieut. Col. Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, Cmdg. Regt.

Maj. AUGUSTUS H. FENN,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Mackenzie's Cav. Brig., Army of the James.

--------------------------------------
 

Lubliner

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@east tennessee roots, I took an interest in these affairs when Petersburg fell and Richmond evacuated. I followed out the details to the South Side Station, where soon the road split, one toward the Namozine Church, where confederate general (?) Ballinger was captured. Deep Creek was at least 5 miles westerly where the confederates dug in for their holding action. I think Humphries was following behind Sheridan on this approach, and Grant was close behind when Jefferson Davis slipped through along the rails via Wilson's or Williams Depot. I believe Meade was on the main road. All this is before High Bridge, and I google mapped the area on ground level, and almost feel as though I walked it. It is that clear.

Being familiar with Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, etc. and Fort Monroe, I happened to dig a bit deeper, and follow a regiment from the beginning to the end. Harlan's Light Brigade seemed to fit this desire, and I have a personal fondness for the Wolfe clan. I know the Lieutenant was captured but maybe in a wishful process, I had read he was reclaimed, possibly when Ewell's Division was captured.
Thanks. I know Rooney Lee was captured and exchanged later with a lesser rank in the trade.

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Eric Wittenberg

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After the war, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hired historian Samuel P. Bates to document Pennsylvania's contribution to the war. The result was a multi-volume set titled History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers. Each regiment is included in the set, with a brief regimental history and a full regimental roster. Where it gets tricky is the fact that each Pennsylvania cavalry regiment had two numbers: its number in the line, and then its designation in the cavalry. For example, the 6th PA Cavalry is also the 70th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers. These units are in numeric order, so you will have to figure out what the number of the Pennsylvania line is, as that's the order in which they appear in the Bates volumes.

The 11th PA Cavalry was part of the Army of the James in 1864, and as I have done some research into the Wilson-Kautz Raid, in which the 11th PA participated, I am familiar with them.

Here's a link to a fully digitized version of Bates' History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers. I would start with the 70th Regiment, simply because there's almost no chance of the 11th PA Cavalry having been formed before the 6th, which was raised in the summer of 1861. You will probably have to go through them one at a time, but you should be able to find what you're looking for here.

http://www.pacivilwar.com/bates.html
 
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Eric Wittenberg

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@east tennessee rootsI know Rooney Lee was captured and exchanged later with a lesser rank in the trade.
That's technically true, but not really. When Rooney was captured in June 1864, he was a brigadier general. He was promoted to major general in September 1863 while still a POW, but he likely didn't know it, and the US Army certainly didn't. He was exchanged for Brig. Gen. Neal Dow as an even exchange because everyone thought he was still a brigadier.
 

Lubliner

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That's technically true, but not really. When Rooney was captured in June 1864, he was a brigadier general. He was promoted to major general in September 1863 while still a POW, but he likely didn't know it, and the US Army certainly didn't. He was exchanged for Brig. Gen. Neal Dow as an even exchange because everyone thought he was still a brigadier.
Thank you for clearing up my mistaken call. I had scratched my head wondering about the exchange and even had the date wrong. Nothing but the keyboard is at my fingertips, and adept maneuvering to a fact can be near impossible; I did mark your link on my favorite bar so I can find my way back again. I had November, 1861 at first with the "108th". I am interested in the Camp Palmer and Hamilton rosters, and Max Weber. The rest of the war is entirely open after MacClellan's Campaign. I made some headway into Suffolk, and early patrols, and the end game I had reviewed. It takes some time to figure how to proceed, so I end up where I wish to be. It is too easy to come up MIA, WIA, KIA, just from a wrong approach. It's the order of the day.
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Lubliner

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There had been a Union spy that had spent 3 months with the rebels, and returned to Casey's Command (?) on the Peninsula. I was trying to backtrack this individual when I started the thread. Of a fact, I am still looking. See how easy it is to get pu;;ed off into a new direction!! Makes me think the powers of command at hand still require the necessity to know for what purpose to come. "Birds of a feather".
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157 years ago, March 17 of 1862, Hamilton's Division was to be loaded onto a transport boat and taken to Fort Monroe for the beginning of the Peninsula Campaign. At that time the 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry had been stationed already at Camp Hamilton since January under General Wool. In case of any attack made against Fort Monroe, General Wool was given permission to use this advance division until General MacLellan arrived. Meantime, due to enemy activity in his front which could not be penetrated as to its design, General Wool sent out a reconnaissance to ascertain what the enemy was up to.
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Lubliner

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OR Series 1, Volume IX, page 15, shows the returns for January 31, 1862 for the Department of Virginia, commanded by Major General John E. Wool. Along with various other regiments I shall name, the 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry was stationed at Camp Hamilton, across Mill Creek near Fort Monroe. These were under the command of Colonel Max Weber of the 20th New York;
1st Delaware.
20th New York.
99th New York, with six companies.
16th Massachusetts.
20th Indiana.
Mounted Rifles, with four companies.

The returns list no artillery present at the Camp.
Present for duty; 164 Officers / Men 4,365.

Lubliner.
Turning to the Official Records, Series 1, Volume 11, Part 3, page 54 the returns for March 31, 1862 at Camp Hamilton are as follows:

1st Delaware.
20th New York.
99th New York (six companies).
16th Massachusetts.
11th Pennsylvania Cavalry.
Mounted Rifles (four companies).
Added to the these was;
1st Michigan.
which replaced the 20th Indiana.
Also added were these two batteries of artillery;
58th Massachusetts Light Artillery, Battery B.
4th U. S. Artillery, Battery D.

The returns reflect only 6 pieces of artillery present at Camp Hamilton.
Officers\--240
Men\--5,492
Aggregate Present\--6,351
Present and Absent\--6,845.

This shows an increase of 76 officers and 2,480 men toward the coming movement with McClellan.

Thanks for your patience,
Lubliner.
 

Lubliner

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There had been a Union spy that had spent 3 months with the rebels, and returned to Casey's Command (?) on the Peninsula. I was trying to backtrack this individual when I started the thread. Of a fact, I am still looking. See how easy it is to get pu;;ed off into a new direction!! Makes me think the powers of command at hand still require the necessity to know for what purpose to come. "Birds of a feather".
Lubliner.
Turning to the Official Records, Series 1 Volume 11, Part 3 again; on page 22;
Lieutenant-Colonel D. P. Woodbury reported to General McClellan while he was still at the Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia on March 19, 1862 a full report. This excerpt is in reference to the above;

"A pretended deserter from our ranks, sent out by General Wool several months ago, has recently returned, a real deserter from the enemy, with precise information on the rebel works between York and James Rivers."

Lubliner.
 
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Camp Hamilton
Built in May of 1861, making claim as being the first Federal camp on Virginia soil.
When soldiers began arriving in large numbers, Lt. Col. Justin Dimick moved men from the 4th Massachusetts Infantry across Mill Creek Bridge and to the Segar and Clark Farms. The confederates with 820 men, armed with 300 flintlock muskets, retreated. Their commander was Lt. Col. Richard S. Ewell.
The camp upon first being constructed, was known as Camp Troy, being renamed Camp Hamilton in honor of Lt. Col. Schuyler Hamilton, the military secretary to General Winfield Scott.
When the 2nd New York and 1st Vermont troops arrived on the Peninsula they were billeted on the Segar Farm, and the camp was no more than tents and other temporary structures formed on Company streets. No extensive fortifications were built at first due to the protection from Fort Monroe’s guns.
“The soldiers drilled, stood guard, attended Bible classes, and became entrepreneurs. Pvt. Alfred Bond made a tidy profit selling cigars to other volunteers and brooded in his diary;

“In Camp Hamilton. Weather cloudy with rain at night and windy. The day is past and gone. The evening shades appear; oh may we all remember well, The night of Death draws near.” "

For pictures of Historical Markers placed at the site follow this link;
https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=10479
 

Lubliner

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The formation of Company M of the 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry originated in Ohio.

Harlan's Light Cavalry.
Capts., Noah M. Runyan, Gerard Reynolds, Samuel N. Titus, Irvin Bacon; First Lt.., William H. Kilmer, Hiram H. Eggleston, J. Samuel Weaver; Second Lieut, Isaac A. Smallwood.
This company was organized at Camp Chase, by Capt. Noah M. Runyan, under an order from the secretary of war, Simon Cameron, authorizing Col. Josiah Harlan to raise an independent regiment of cavalry, the intention being to have companies from twelve different states. It was subsequently found, however, that the laws of Congress did not authorize the recruiting of single companies in a state. This company was therefore attached to the 11th Pa. cavalry and designated as Co. M.
The company was mustered into the U. S. service Sept. 1, 1861, at Camp Chase, for three years, and proceeded at once to join the 11th Pa. at Hesterville, a suburb of Philadelphia. From Philadelphia the company was sent with its regiment to Ball's cross-roads, Va., where it went into camp. Its active campaigning commenced in the spring of 1863.
It was at the siege of Suffolk, Co. M being stationed at South mills as an outpost, guarding the approach in that direction. It participated in the attack on the enemy's works, near Hanover Court House, which resulted in the capture of 125 Confederate prisoners, among them Brig.-Gen. W. H. F. Lee, 700 horses and mules, 80 wagons, and other property.
After reenlisting the company, in May, 1864, accompanied Brig.-Gen. A. V. Kautz in his operations against the Weldon railroad, Danville railroad, etc. At Jarratt's station the company lost 1 man killed and 11 wounded. At Reams' station the regiment engaged the enemy for three days, almost without intermission, with some loss.
In March, 1865, it crossed the James and Appomattox rivers, and followed the fortunes of Sheridan's command until the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. It was mustered out on Aug. 13, 1865.
https://civilwarindex.com/armyoh/harlans_light_cavalry.html
 

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www.pacivilwar.com/regiment/108th.html

This site carries the full breakdown of each company and the regimental history for the Pennsylvania Volunteers of the 108th.

I shall have a time locating Lt. Wolfe, and whether he served under Harlan at any point during the war.
It appears that this regiment carried troops from New York, Iowa, and Ohio, as well as Pennsylvania.
I guess first things first may not apply?

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On the site I posted in #15, for the regimental history, it shows that Company M was mustered on August 19th, 1861 at Columbus, Ohio by Captain Stransberry, U. S. A.
It also shows its first engagement came at Newport News, Virginia on March 9th, when it scouted forward to Lee's Mills, about 10 miles up the Peninsula toward Yorktown.
This discrepancy with post #14 is a mystery to be solved.
Lubliner.
 

Lubliner

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Of course with a mystery involved, I had to dig deeper. And I was successful in finally tracking down a good source.

Pennsylvania Cavalry Source


https://archive.org/details/historyofelevent00penn/page/n6
History of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry
Together with a Complete Roster of the Regiment and
Regimental Officers
© Franklin Printing Company, Philadelphia, 1902

This History was prepared and signed in the Preface by:
John L. Roper, Norfolk, Va.
Henry C. Archibald, M. D., Phila, Pa.
G. W. Coles, Camden, N. J.
History Committee, Philadelphia, Pa., 1902

Page 11: “Soon after the battle of Bull Run, Josiah Harlan, a citizen of Chester County, Pa., was authorized by the Secretary of War to recruit an independent cavalry brigade.”

“Colonel Harlan wrote to Samuel Wetherill at Bethlehem, Pa., who raised the first squadron of the regiment, which was mustered in by General Ruff, their Colonel, at Philadelphia, August 19th, 1861.

Page 12: “The recruiting camp of ‘Harlan’s Light Cavalry’, as it was then designated, was established at Hestenville, a suburb of Philadelphia, about the 15th of August….Companies with full ranks, arriving at Philadelphia, were mustered in by Captain Starr, of the regular army, and were sent at once to Camp Harlan, near Washington.”
“Camp Harlan was located in a grove on Seventh Street, half a mile north of the Park Hotel….Lieutenant-Colonel Spear was placed in command of the camp….”

Page 12-13: “The Eleventh then consisted of Company A, of Iowa; Company B, of Chester County, Pa.; Company C, of Philadelphia, Pa.; Company D, of Franklin County, Pa.; Company E, of Philadelphia, Pa.; Company F, of Tioga, Pa.; Company G, of Cambria County, Pa.; Company H, of Northampton County, Pa.; Company I, of Lancaster County, Pa., and New Jersey; Company K, of Luzerne County, Pa., and Company M, of Ohio.”

Lubliner.
 

Lubliner

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Continuing into the source per investigation.

Pennsylvania Cavalry Source 2

Page 13: The regiment bore the title of Harlan’s Volunteer United States Cavalry until Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania, insisted upon the whole regiment being accredited to the State and issued its commission to Josiah Harlan, Pa., colonel, July 23rd, 1861;
S. P. Spear, Pa., lieutenant-colonel, September 25th, 1861;
George Stetzel, Pa., first major, October 9th, 1861;
Samuel Wetherill, Pa. second major, October 1st, 1861;
N. M. Runyan, Ohio, third major, October 9th, 1861.”

Page 15: “Water for cooking and drinking purposes was obtained from wells in the immediate vicinity of the camp, and at these springs guards were placed to preserve order.”
“The sanitary conditions of Camp Harlan soon became bad; change of climate, of water, of diet, of habits were soon felt.”
“During the afternoon of the 13th of October, orders were received to march next morning. At the three o’clock the men were routed out, and from that time until 8 A. M., there was all the hustle and bustle and excitement natural to a first change of camp….The following afternoon another short march was made, and the regiment went into what was supposed to be a permanent camp for the winter near Ball’s Cross Roads.”

Page 16: “Here it was attached to a cavalry brigade commanded by Brigadier-General James N. Palmer.”
“While stationed at Camp Palmer, it was necessary to dig in the ravine at the foot of Upton’s Hill and sink barrels to collect water for watering the horses.’
“On November 2d Major Wetherill reported with his battalion to Major-General O. O. Howard, at Bladensburg Md.; for duty at the Maryland elections on the western shores.. As General Howard’s body escort, he was sent forward with the battalion cavalry to St. Leonards….”

Page 18: “The associations at Camp Palmer were pleasant, though the weather was inclement; yet by this time the regiment had become accustomed to the rudiments of soldiering. There was considerable foot and mounted drill, also any amount of camp and stable guard duty to perform….But the sanitary conditions soon became worse than at Camp Harlan….”
 
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Pennsylvania Cavalry Source 3

Chapter I. Organization.
Chapter II. On the March and Camp Hamilton.

Page 20: “On the 17th of November the regiment broke camp and recrossed the Potomac. The Long Bridge was undergoing repairs and the men were compelled to ride by file over planks temporarily laid down, which caused a long delay….All the convalescents from the regimental hospitals had been ordered to join their companies when the regiment broke camp…the exposure caused them to contract colds, so that many were discharged before the winter was over.”
“When the river had been crossed the regiment marched down Pennsylvania Avenue to the dilapidated village of Bladensburg where the night was spent.’
“The regiment broke camp on the morning of the 18th, continuing its march….Towards evening the regiment went into camp near an old convent, the sole occupants of which appeared to be two sisters. An aged priest dwelt in a house near by.”

Page 21: “After a pleasant march of twelve miles, Annapolis was reached in the afternoon….Camp was pitched near St. John’s Hospital, the only new building in the place….Owing to the non-arrival of transports, the regiment remained in Annapolis several days. During which there was daily drill on the college campus.”
“The stay at Annapolis was a pleasant one. The men were given considerable freedom; whoever desired could explore the old town to their heart’s content. Fish and oysters were abundant and cheap; those with money could buy; those without---beg, catch, or steal----“
“The regiment was then transferred to Fortress Monroe and encamped on the road to Hampton. Camp Hamilton was destined to be the home of the regiment for several months.”

Page22: “The change from the vicinity of Washington to Fortress Monroe was a good one for the Eleventh….The first thing done was the building of stables for the horses. The regiment had several carpenters in its ranks, most of whom were detailed, and under the superintendence of Lieutenant Rice, six double stables were built, each of which had room for two hundred and six horses. The wedge tents which had previously been used were turned over to the quartermasters, and Sibley tents were issued in their place---a tent which greatly added to comfort. While the building was going on the men took enough lumber to floor their tents and to build doorways.’
“Soon after the arrival of the regiment at Fortress Monroe it was fully armed with sabers and pistols, also ten carbines to each company. All the companies except Company A were uniformed before leaving Camp Harlan….”
“The equipment by the volunteer army by the Government was rather grotesque, since a lot of useless equipments were issued. Each cavalryman received a lariat rope and pin….Each artilleryman had a saber of no use whatever, except on occasions of ceremony….”

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Pennsylvania Cavalry Source 4


Page 23: “The commanding officer of Camp Hamilton was Colonel Max Weber, of the Twentieth New York Volunteers. Colonel Weber was a native German and received a military education in his native country. The other infantry regiments at Camp Hamilton were the First Delaware, Colonel Andrews; the Sixteenth Massachusetts, Colonel Wyman; and the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Jones….”
“There was also another infantry organization at Camp Hamilton, the Ninety-ninth New York, Colonel Wardrope, recruited for coast service, and it was frequently called the ‘Naval Brigade’ and ‘Coast Guard’. During the war a large number of the officers and men of the Ninety-ninth served on the army gunboats in the tidewater region of Virginia and North Carolina. The crew of the [U. S. S.] ‘Congress’ at the time of the naval battle in Hampton Roads were from the Ninety-ninth.”
“The mounted troops nesies the Eleventh at Camp Hamilton, was the battalion of New York Mounted Riflemen, Major Dodge, which was afterwards increased to a regiment, with the major as its colonel. The light artillery was batteries D and L, of the Fourth United States, commanded by Captains Fallett and Howard."

Page24: “….an abundance of supplies was received for man and beast; vegetables and milk could be obtained from the farmers living in the vicinity of the camp, and soon a new status of affairs was felt in the entire camp. The horses were soon in good condition and mounted drill was the order of the day.”
“A regimental band was organized at Camp Hamilton….The band was involuntarily disbanded on the 29th of June, 1864, at Ream’s Station [Va.].”
“The first picket duty done by the Eleventh was after the middle of January, 1862, and the nearest rebel picket was at Big bethel (about eight miles from Camp Hamilton) with cavalry videttes abou two miles nearer, on the Black River and Sawyer swamp Roads. The Union picket line was on the west side of the village of Hampton with a vidette at the forks of the New Market Bridge, and New Bridge Roads.”
“The only use made of the cavalry for picket duty was to send, four times every twenty-four hours, a sergeant with a squad of men to the New Market Bridge, a duty was relieving to the men, as it broke the monotony of camp life. [But] few of the enemy were seen during the winter.”
“The village of Hampton was the western limit of the camp, and is located on both sides of Hampton Creek. All the town on the west side of the creek was burned in August ’61…to prevent the Northern troops using the place for quarters the ensuing winter.”
[Those orders came from Confederate General Magruder].

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