Authentic Lemonade

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
29,232
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
#1
lemonade.jpg


Many of the earliest Southern cookbooks included recipes for lemonade. One was the 1824 cookbook, "The Virginia Housewife" by Mary Randolph. She simply advised mixing freshly pressed lemon juice with water and sugar to taste. That wasn't much of a recipe but lemonade became very popular in the South.

The key is a basic balance and smooth texture, and simple syrup made with regular granulated white cane sugar. Using a one-to-one ratio, simmer your sugar and water in a saucepan over low heat until the sugar is dissolved and the syrup is clear. Make sure the mixture does not boil. Allow the syrup to cool. and keep it refrigerated. Now that you have your syrup, juice a dozen very fresh, springy-feeling lemons, removing the seeds but keeping the pulp for texture and bursts of flavor. Mix in seven cups of filtered water and three cups of the syrup.

You will find this so refreshing and certainly authentic Dixie lemonade.

From: "The Southerner's Handbook", by David DiBenedetto and the editors of Garden & Gun.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

WJC

Brigadier General
Moderator
Thread Medic
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
10,731
#5
View attachment 150215

Many of the earliest Southern cookbooks included recipes for lemonade. One was the 1824 cookbook, "The Virginia Housewife" by Mary Randolph. She simply advised mixing freshly pressed lemon juice with water and sugar to taste. That wasn't much of a recipe but lemonade became very popular in the South.

The key is a basic balance and smooth texture, and simple syrup made with regular granulated white cane sugar. Using a one-to-one ratio, simmer your sugar and water in a saucepan over low heat until the sugar is dissolved and the syrup is clear. Make sure the mixture does not boil. Allow the syrup to cool. and keep it refrigerated. Now that you have your syrup, juice a dozen very fresh, springy-feeling lemons, removing the seeds but keeping the pulp for texture and bursts of flavor. Mix in seven cups of filtered water and three cups of the syrup.

You will find this so refreshing and certainly authentic Dixie lemonade.

From: "The Southerner's Handbook", by David DiBenedetto and the editors of Garden & Gun.
Thanks for posting.
Interesting twist: we'll have to try this....
 

Cavalry Charger

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Messages
5,588
#9
View attachment 150215

Many of the earliest Southern cookbooks included recipes for lemonade. One was the 1824 cookbook, "The Virginia Housewife" by Mary Randolph. She simply advised mixing freshly pressed lemon juice with water and sugar to taste. That wasn't much of a recipe but lemonade became very popular in the South.

The key is a basic balance and smooth texture, and simple syrup made with regular granulated white cane sugar. Using a one-to-one ratio, simmer your sugar and water in a saucepan over low heat until the sugar is dissolved and the syrup is clear. Make sure the mixture does not boil. Allow the syrup to cool. and keep it refrigerated. Now that you have your syrup, juice a dozen very fresh, springy-feeling lemons, removing the seeds but keeping the pulp for texture and bursts of flavor. Mix in seven cups of filtered water and three cups of the syrup.

You will find this so refreshing and certainly authentic Dixie lemonade.

From: "The Southerner's Handbook", by David DiBenedetto and the editors of Garden & Gun.
YAY! You posted me a recipe for authentic Dixie lemonade :smile: So excited to try this, @donna ! So easy, too.
 
Joined
May 20, 2018
Messages
396
Location
Silver run Md carroll county
#13
View attachment 150215

Many of the earliest Southern cookbooks included recipes for lemonade. One was the 1824 cookbook, "The Virginia Housewife" by Mary Randolph. She simply advised mixing freshly pressed lemon juice with water and sugar to taste. That wasn't much of a recipe but lemonade became very popular in the South.

The key is a basic balance and smooth texture, and simple syrup made with regular granulated white cane sugar. Using a one-to-one ratio, simmer your sugar and water in a saucepan over low heat until the sugar is dissolved and the syrup is clear. Make sure the mixture does not boil. Allow the syrup to cool. and keep it refrigerated. Now that you have your syrup, juice a dozen very fresh, springy-feeling lemons, removing the seeds but keeping the pulp for texture and bursts of flavor. Mix in seven cups of filtered water and three cups of the syrup.

You will find this so refreshing and certainly authentic Dixie lemonade.

From: "The Southerner's Handbook", by David DiBenedetto and the editors of Garden & Gun.
Sounds good
 
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
Messages
186
#17
View attachment 150215
She simply advised mixing freshly pressed lemon juice with water and sugar to taste.
My brother used to make lemonade with Mrs. Randolph's recipe -- sort of. He'd get a bottle of lemon juice and used that instead of pressing lemons. He'd always end up with a sugar sludge in the bottom of his glass, because his sugar preference was much too high to mix in cold water! Told him about simple syrups, but, as with pressing fresh lemons, that was too much work for him. Why he didn't just give up and keep some of the powdered stuff on hand (which he'd drink just fine), I have never understood.
 

Similar threads




(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top