Legislation passed during Civil War and other issues than slavery causing war

jgoodguy

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There's been hundreds of pages of alternatives offered on many subjects. The same folks usually poo poo those alternatives. So, not really sure what you're referring to here. Check out Anderson's award winning thread. Even my lazy self made some contributions to that thread.
for this poor soul, please list some of those alternatives.
 

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jgoodguy

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Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.”
~ Stephen R. Covey
“Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”
― Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

One of those is that one day I will log on here and see that list.
 

Potomac Pride

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@Potomac Pride ,

What historical facts concerning the American Civil War require "interpretation?"

Here on this very thread we have tried to see "other issues than slavery causing the Civil War" but what has been presented as "other causes" that are not intertwined or simply dominated by slavery? Has not every other issue presented as "another" cause been lifted from a source that contained, to some degree, the issue of slavery? Has there been one documented source completely free of that issue?

Unionblue
There have been other issues discussed on this thread besides slavery that were involved in the war. Some of these issues are even contained in the Articles of Secession. However, if they are unrelated to slavery, nobody wants to pay any attention to them. Unfortunately, that is an oversimplistic attitude when studying history. Instead of considering any other issues, it is easier for some people just to blame it all on slavery.
 
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WJC

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In the past generations, there have been different schools of thought regarding the reasons for the war. Some of these schools of thought maintain that slavery wasn't a significant cause of the war and were put forth by noted historians and scholars.
Can you provide some examples?
 

WJC

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There have been other issues discussed on this thread besides slavery that were involved in the war. Some of these issues are even contained in the Articles of Secession. However, if they are unrelated to slavery, nobody wants to pay any attention to them. Unfortunately, that is an oversimplistic attitude when studying history. Instead of considering any other issues, it is easier for some people just to blame it all on slavery.
Are you suggesting that every factor mentioned was equally important? If not, how often does a factor need to be identified to show it was more important than others?
 

unionblue

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Are you suggesting that every factor mentioned was equally important? If not, how often does a factor need to be identified to show it was more important than others?
@jgoodguy ,

I will make a prediction.

That any other legislation passed during the civil war will not be free, in word or intent, free from the influence of slavery.

I invite all of my fellow forum members to prove me wrong by posting such legislation/period documentation/sources, IN FULL CONTEXT or with a source/link showing that full context, showing slavery had no impact on such.

I await answers and examples.

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 

jgoodguy

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unionblue

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Slavery was the sole reason why the South seceded we have pages of quotes from @CW Watch Collector about that. No body is going to stop through bullets to save Ellie Mae a few cents on an imported dress.
Leftyhunter
@Potomac Pride ,

And the above post#185 proves what?

How does this answer my own recent post# 311?

Unionblue
 

WJC

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Yes, they have in fact. Please see Post #185.
Thanks for your response.
So thus far, at least in this thread of over 300 posts, two members have indicated that they believe slavery was the only factor that led to secession. I wonder how that compares with the number of members who have posted in this thread that slavery was not a factor....
 

unionblue

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Thanks for your response.
So thus far, at least in this thread of over 300 posts, two members have indicated that they believe slavery was the only factor that led to secession. I wonder how that compares with the number of members who have posted in this thread that slavery was not a factor....
@WJC ,

Perhaps a past poll on what primary factor/issue caused the Civil War could answer your question or perhaps a new poll could give such numbers.

Unionblue
 

jgoodguy

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Thanks for your response.
So thus far, at least in this thread of over 300 posts, two members have indicated that they believe slavery was the only factor that led to secession. I wonder how that compares with the number of members who have posted in this thread that slavery was not a factor....
My position is that I can find no reason unrelated to slavery. Everything is entangled.
 

Potomac Pride

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Are you suggesting that every factor mentioned was equally important? If not, how often does a factor need to be identified to show it was more important than others?
No, I never said that every factor mentioned was equally important and I don't really know how often a factor needs to be identified to show it was more important than others.
 

jgoodguy

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Crittenden Compromise

Another compromise suggested. Can we find something in the way of objection to Northern legislation in existence as of December 1860? I do not see any.

Amendments to the Constitution
  1. Slavery would be prohibited in any territory of the United States "now held, or hereafter acquired," north of latitude 36 degrees, 30 minutes line. In territories south of this line, slavery of the African race was "hereby recognized" and could not be interfered with by Congress. Furthermore, property in African slaves was to be "protected by all the departments of the territorial government during its continuance." States would be admitted to the Union from any territory with or without slavery as their constitutions provided.
  2. Congress was forbidden to abolish slavery in places under its jurisdiction within a slave state such as a military post.
  3. Congress could not abolish slavery in the District of Columbia so long as it existed in the adjoining states of Virginia and Maryland and without the consent of the District's inhabitants. Compensation would be given to owners who refused consent to abolition.
  4. Congress could not prohibit or interfere with the interstate slave trade.
  5. Congress would provide full compensation to owners of rescued fugitive slaves. Congress was empowered to sue the county in which obstruction to the fugitive slave laws took place to recover payment; the county, in turn, could sue "the wrong doers or rescuers" who prevented the return of the fugitive.
  6. No future amendment of the Constitution could change these amendments or authorize or empower Congress to interfere with slavery within any slave state.[5]
Congressional resolutions
  1. That fugitive slave laws were constitutional and should be faithfully observed and executed.
  2. That all state laws which impeded the operation of fugitive slave laws, the so-called "Personal liberty laws," were unconstitutional and should be repealed.
  3. That the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 should be amended (and rendered less objectionable to the North) by equalizing the fee schedule for returning or releasing alleged fugitives and limiting the powers of marshals to summon citizens to aid in their capture.
  4. That laws for the suppression of the African slave trade should be effectively and thoroughly executed.[5]
 
People like to bring up the Articles of Secessions of the southern states but some of those don't even mention slavery. Furthermore, some of the Articles of Secession that do mention slavery also bring up additional issues of concern.
Only four states issued articles or declarations of causes and slavery was mentioned in all four documents. For whatever reason, Virginia's Ordinance of Secession is listed on many websites among the other four state's Declaration of Causes of Secession and of course slavery is not mentioned in her ordinance. An ordinance is a law or decree issued by a state legislature or a local body of government and as such, does not normally list the reasons in the ordinance that led to its enactment.
 
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