Handguns Lefaucheux pinfire revolver

Bama Mike

Private
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Section, Alabama
I am seeking info on a revolver that was excavated in Scottsboro, Al. The weapon is a Lefaucheux 7mm pinfire revolver in good condition. It has a folding trigger, engraving and bone handles with serial #16596. I have photos of it if I can post them on this site. Any help concerning this weapon would be appreciated. All the people present at time of excavation are deceased. Weapon had to have been in some type of watertight storage container since there is no rust has a nice patina finish.
 

Bama Mike

Private
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Section, Alabama
Photo of weapon excavated in Scottsboro, Al.

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ucvrelics

Colonel
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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
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Yes they had 9mm which were civilian models, but I was referring to the 12000 purchased by the US Army, they were in 12mm. Gen Jackson carried this Beaumont-Adams revolver.
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Bama Mike

Private
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Section, Alabama
Yes they had 9mm which were civilian models, but I was referring to the 12000 purchased by the US Army, they were in 12mm. Gen Jackson carried this Beaumont-Adams revolver.
View attachment 346205
The trigger folds up making it ideal for a “belly” gun and unfolds when you cock the hammer. My research indicates the Lefaucheux was the 4th most popular handgun after Colt, Remington and Star. Never heard of Star or Lefaucheux until I came across this revolver and began trying to discover its identity. Found a YouTube video where you can make ammo that fires in it out of modern cartridges. My son reloads and we may experiment. I don’t intend to fire it but would be interesting to make some cartridges for it to show others the evolution of ammo.
 

Mark A

Corporal
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Location
Jefferson County TN
Yes they had 9mm which were civilian models, but I was referring to the 12000 purchased by the US Army, they were in 12mm. Gen Jackson carried this Beaumont-Adams revolver.
View attachment 346205

Something about this revolver bothers me as for it being attributed to Jackson. This looks like a John Adams' Army Revolver, Mark 1 cartridge conversion. These guns were short lived being made somewhere between 1867-69. I can't reconcile Jackson, who died in May 1864 ever having this revolver.

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Photo of page 127, THE REVOLVER, 1865-1888 by Taylerson.

Kind Regards,
Mark A
Jefferson County, TN
 

ucvrelics

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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
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That is because Adam's produced his own version in the post CW years.The Beaumont-Adams revolvers found themselves in some very interesting hands both during and after the Civil War. One cased example was engraved and presented to Confederate General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson as a gift from the inventor, Robert Adams and is in the collection of the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond.

In 1854, Lt. Frederick Beaumont developed an improvement for Adams’ lockwork, which produced what would be called a traditional “double action” revolver today. The new lockwork allowed the revolver to operate in the fashion of Adams’ original design, but also added the facility to cock the revolver manually and fire it with a lighter “single action” trigger pull. This refinement allowed for more accurate shooting. In 1854, Adams also patented refinements to his original frame design by adding a sliding frame mounted safety on the right side of the revolver, and an improved cylinder arbor retaining mechanism as well. The resultant combination of design improvements were manufactured as the Model 1854 revolver, known to most as the Beaumont-Adams revolver. The revolvers were produced directly by Adams as part of his partnership with the London based Deane, Adams & Deane, as well under license by Birmingham makers like Joseph Brazier and Isaac Hollis & Sons. The revolver was also licensed for production in America by the Massachusetts Arms Company, as well as in Belgium and some of the German states. William Tranter also employed Adams solid frame in the production of his revolvers. Upon the dissolution of the Deane, Adams & Deane firm, Adams went to work for the London Armoury Company, and his revolvers were produced there as well from circa 1857-1859.

It is difficult to ascertain exactly how many Adams patent revolvers were imported for use during the American Civil War. At least 1,075 were purchased directly by the US government. It is known that some military outfitters like Schuyler, Hartley & Graham purchased quantities of these revolvers for private sale to officers and those volunteer groups who looked to their state and local governments, rather than the US government, to purchase arms. About 300 of the Schuyler, Hartley & Graham guns are reported to have been purchased by the state of Alabama prior to the war. Virginia and Georgia are reported to have made pre-war purchases of these revolvers as well. While the Confederate central government never directly contracted to purchase Adams patent revolvers (they concentrated on purchasing Kerr’s Patent revolvers from the London Armoury Company), Confederate speculators and individual states did purchase these fine English revolvers in some quantity. A number of Confederate identified and presented Adams revolvers exist in public and private collections, including #40,537 in the Museum of the Confederacy. This revolver is cased with an engraved presentation plaque from Robert Adams to Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. Two other Adams revolvers in the low 41,XXX range are attributed to Confederate naval use aboard the CSS Shenandoah. Most Confederate war time purchases are believed to have fallen within the 32,000 to 42,000 serial number range, although it is quite likely that guns produced prior to that range (and imported to America) were used, and in some cases old stock was sold to Confederate speculators, resulting in pistols that were several years old passing through the blockade. Civil War regiments that are known to have carried or been issued Adams Patent revolvers include the 8th PA and 2nd MI cavalry on the US side and the 1st & 5th VA and 5th GA cavalry on the CS side. It is generally assumed that the majority of these guns were 54-bore (.442 caliber) Beaumont Adams M1854 pattern revolvers.






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Mark A

Corporal
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Location
Jefferson County TN
That is because Adam's produced his own version in the post CW years.The Beaumont-Adams revolvers found themselves in some very interesting hands both during and after the Civil War. One cased example was engraved and presented to Confederate General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson as a gift from the inventor, Robert Adams and is in the collection of the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond.

In 1854, Lt. Frederick Beaumont developed an improvement for Adams’ lockwork, which produced what would be called a traditional “double action” revolver today. The new lockwork allowed the revolver to operate in the fashion of Adams’ original design, but also added the facility to cock the revolver manually and fire it with a lighter “single action” trigger pull. This refinement allowed for more accurate shooting. In 1854, Adams also patented refinements to his original frame design by adding a sliding frame mounted safety on the right side of the revolver, and an improved cylinder arbor retaining mechanism as well. The resultant combination of design improvements were manufactured as the Model 1854 revolver, known to most as the Beaumont-Adams revolver. The revolvers were produced directly by Adams as part of his partnership with the London based Deane, Adams & Deane, as well under license by Birmingham makers like Joseph Brazier and Isaac Hollis & Sons. The revolver was also licensed for production in America by the Massachusetts Arms Company, as well as in Belgium and some of the German states. William Tranter also employed Adams solid frame in the production of his revolvers. Upon the dissolution of the Deane, Adams & Deane firm, Adams went to work for the London Armoury Company, and his revolvers were produced there as well from circa 1857-1859.

It is difficult to ascertain exactly how many Adams patent revolvers were imported for use during the American Civil War. At least 1,075 were purchased directly by the US government. It is known that some military outfitters like Schuyler, Hartley & Graham purchased quantities of these revolvers for private sale to officers and those volunteer groups who looked to their state and local governments, rather than the US government, to purchase arms. About 300 of the Schuyler, Hartley & Graham guns are reported to have been purchased by the state of Alabama prior to the war. Virginia and Georgia are reported to have made pre-war purchases of these revolvers as well. While the Confederate central government never directly contracted to purchase Adams patent revolvers (they concentrated on purchasing Kerr’s Patent revolvers from the London Armoury Company), Confederate speculators and individual states did purchase these fine English revolvers in some quantity. A number of Confederate identified and presented Adams revolvers exist in public and private collections, including #40,537 in the Museum of the Confederacy. This revolver is cased with an engraved presentation plaque from Robert Adams to Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. Two other Adams revolvers in the low 41,XXX range are attributed to Confederate naval use aboard the CSS Shenandoah. Most Confederate war time purchases are believed to have fallen within the 32,000 to 42,000 serial number range, although it is quite likely that guns produced prior to that range (and imported to America) were used, and in some cases old stock was sold to Confederate speculators, resulting in pistols that were several years old passing through the blockade. Civil War regiments that are known to have carried or been issued Adams Patent revolvers include the 8th PA and 2nd MI cavalry on the US side and the 1st & 5th VA and 5th GA cavalry on the CS side. It is generally assumed that the majority of these guns were 54-bore (.442 caliber) Beaumont Adams M1854 pattern revolvers.






he View attachment 346473

I'm aware of the history of the Beaumont-Adams and Tim Prince at College Hill Arsenal wrote a great history of these revolvers. I'm not questioning that Jackson may have indeed carried a Beaumont-Adams revolver. There is 0% chance that he carried the cartridge gun in the first photo that you posted. It is much more likely that he carried the percussion B-A in your latest post.

Mark A
 

ucvrelics

Colonel
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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
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I'm aware of the history of the Beaumont-Adams and Tim Prince at College Hill Arsenal wrote a great history of these revolvers. I'm not questioning that Jackson may have indeed carried a Beaumont-Adams revolver. There is 0% chance that he carried the cartridge gun in the first photo that you posted. It is much more likely that he carried the percussion B-A in your latest post.

Mark A
Thanks for the update as you are correct in the first one is not a B&A. You other email was a bit confusing but then again I'm just a crazy old man thats half blind and drinks. On another note Gen Jackson did receive a 9mm Lefaucheux later on.
 

lefaucheux

Private
Joined
Apr 15, 2015
Location
France
I am seeking info on a revolver that was excavated in Scottsboro, Al. The weapon is a Lefaucheux 7mm pinfire revolver in good condition. It has a folding trigger, engraving and bone handles with serial #16596. I have photos of it if I can post them on this site. Any help concerning this weapon would be appreciated. All the people present at time of excavation are deceased. Weapon had to have been in some type of watertight storage container since there is no rust has a nice patina finish.

This is a Belgium made pinfire revolver, not made by Lefaucheux.
The Lefaucheux proofmark on the left side means that the patent royalties had been payed to Lefaucheux .
The 16596 has been made in 1859 by a Belgium gunsmidt .
Show us good pictures of all the proofmarks and others names or marks, perhaps I can tell you more about it

Lefaucheux
 
Last edited:

Bama Mike

Private
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Section, Alabama
This is a Belgium made pinfire revolver, not made by Lefaucheux.
The Lefaucheux proofmark on the left side means that the patent royalties had been payed to Lefaucheux .
The 16596 has been made in 1859 by a Belgium gunsmidt .
Show us good pictures of all the proofmarks and others names or marks, perhaps I can tell you more about it

Lefaucheux
 

tripped

Private
Joined
Jun 17, 2013
I don't understand how this was "excavated" even in a "waterproof" box. I can't imagine a waterproof box from that time period that would have survived for long. Maybe it was excavated in a cellar. I found several guns in the pocket doors of my house that aren't as clean as that. Still it's a very nice gun but I wouldn't put much credence in the excavated story.
 

Llewellyn

Corporal
Joined
Feb 17, 2020
Location
Britain
That Beaumont-Adams model was the standard British Army revolver in cal .442 at time of the ACW.

Stonewall made a good choice. It was very popular gun which sold well in various calibres. It's success is sometimes given as the reason why Colt closed down their London factory in 1856.
 

Bama Mike

Private
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Section, Alabama
I don't understand how this was "excavated" even in a "waterproof" box. I can't imagine a waterproof box from that time period that would have survived for long. Maybe it was excavated in a cellar. I found several guns in the pocket doors of my house that aren't as clean as that. Still it's a very nice gun but I wouldn't put much credence in the excavated story.
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Bama Mike

Private
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Section, Alabama
I understand your thoughts and I have questions about the details myself. However, the man who owned this revolver was a dear friend of mine for 10 years. He was a pillar in our community and known for his honesty. The people who had worked for him told me about the weapon and that it had been excavated while digging a trench for a natural gas line. I was told that story 3 separate time, each independently without knowing the others. I can’t explain it but I don’t doubt their story even if it sounds illogical. That is not my focus. I am interested in the history of the weapon as his widow has asked me to sell it for her. I would like to see it go to someone who can appreciate it for what it is.
 

Bama Mike

Private
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Section, Alabama
This is a Belgium made pinfire revolver, not made by Lefaucheux.
The Lefaucheux proofmark on the left side means that the patent royalties had been payed to Lefaucheux .
The 16596 has been made in 1859 by a Belgium gunsmidt .
Show us good pictures of all the proofmarks and others names or marks, perhaps I can tell you more about it

Lefaucheux

image.jpg


image.jpg


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