Lee's heart attack in 1863


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#4
It has been mentioned by many sources that Lee was not himself prior to Gettysburg. I would bet good money that if and when it becomes possible that a way is found to go back in time, the period of time 29 June 1863 to 4 July 1863 will draw a significant amount of interest!
 
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#6
We all just need to be grateful Lee survived to be at the surrender---Not sure it would have gone as smooth as it did otherwise---His men accepted it hard but still O.K. because Lee was still leading them. I think Lee's greatest service to the Confederacy was this honorable surrender and the start of new lives for men of the North and South. His example helped to make the honorable peace acceptable. Grant knew this and was wise in his handling of the situation. Even Traveler was moved to the attention of the men on the return trip. I will volunteer for that time machine mentioned.
 
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#7
His ears give away his health...

1-s2.0-s000291491730718x-gr1_lrg_0.jpg



His Ears shows signs of heart disease... A snippet...

Richard Reinhart, an emeritus professor of medicine at East Carolina University and author of the paper, says earlobe creases can help detect heart disease. Some previous reports have pointed to heart disease as the cause of Lee’s death based on written evidence, but “until now there hadn’t been an actual physical finding supporting this diagnosis,” Reinhart tells Mental Floss. “His earlobe crease is the only piece of objective physical evidence that helps back it up.”

The possible connection between earlobe creases and heart disease was first made in 1973, and there have since been more than 120 studies investigating the link. Scientists aren’t sure why creases appear in the earlobes of some heart disease patients, but researchers have suggested that a heart condition may affect the blood vessels and elasticity of the earlobe in a way that forms a crease over time.

Link...http://mentalfloss.com/article/5262...zling-death-might-be-hidden-photo-his-earlobe

 
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#8
Here a follow-up...


Expired Image Removed

Has a name:

A Brief History: Frank’s Sign

In 1973, a physician called Sanders T. Frank had a letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine describing 20 of his patients with an earlobe crease, who were under 60 years old, with angina (chest pain) and proven coronary artery blockages. This study was the first to describe such a possible association between heart disease and an earlobe crease. However, there was no normal group to compare this to, making it scientifically inconclusive. Since then numerous studies, including those with control groups, have backed up the association. But what does all this mean? When determining associations we need to ask a number of important questions. 1) Does the data support a true association of an earlobe crease and heart disease? 2) If there is an association, is this just due to the fact that the earlobe crease is associated with already established risk factors for heart disease? 3) Is the presence of an earlobe crease independently associated with heart disease? 4) If there is an association, what is the explanation?

https://myheart.net/articles/earlobe-crease-and-heart-disease-fact-or-myth/
 
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#10
Here a follow-up...


Expired Image Removed

Has a name:

A Brief History: Frank’s Sign

In 1973, a physician called Sanders T. Frank had a letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine describing 20 of his patients with an earlobe crease, who were under 60 years old, with angina (chest pain) and proven coronary artery blockages. This study was the first to describe such a possible association between heart disease and an earlobe crease. However, there was no normal group to compare this to, making it scientifically inconclusive. Since then numerous studies, including those with control groups, have backed up the association. But what does all this mean? When determining associations we need to ask a number of important questions. 1) Does the data support a true association of an earlobe crease and heart disease? 2) If there is an association, is this just due to the fact that the earlobe crease is associated with already established risk factors for heart disease? 3) Is the presence of an earlobe crease independently associated with heart disease? 4) If there is an association, what is the explanation?

https://myheart.net/articles/earlobe-crease-and-heart-disease-fact-or-myth/
The answer may be something called old age--wrinkles do occur--as well as heart issues.
 
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#11
How many people looked in the mirror?
Hahahaa, just wanted to tell that I did check my earlobes a minute ago!

Most interesting thread! And given the fact that Lee wanted to resign after Gettysburg because he felt he was no longer up to being in command of the ANV and was denied it, how much must he have suffered! I'm sure we have a thread in the "What if" forum discussing what could have been if Lee had been in good health and as strong and powerful as he used to be in the beginning of the war...
 
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#12
I first learned about Lee's heart issues when I read The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara. Prior to reading that book, I didn't know that heart disease is what caused his death.
 

E_just_E

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#13
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1542842

"We believe that General Robert E. Lee had ischemic heart disease. It is our opinion that he sustained a heart attack in 1863 and that this illness had a major influence on the battle of Gettysburg."

Are any of you aware of this study?
Color me skeptical. Not the least, because of the Journal it was published, which is not irrelevant, but inappropriate.

(in case you missed it, it was published in Surgery: Gynecology & Obstetrics)
 



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