Breechldrs Leather "sleeve" for Sharp & Hankin carbine: What was it for ? Why ?

Peter Stines

Sergeant
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Location
Gulf Coast of Texas
Looking through an old Dixie Gun Works Catalog (Slim Pickens was on the cover) and saw a reproduction leather "sleeve" for S&H. I know NOTHING ABOUT THIS. SO SOMEONE TELL ME MORE. What was this used for and why ? The catalog description mentioned how to install the sleeve. wetting the leather, etc. Now I used to sew leather and know about wet forming. Oh Oracles of Knowledge Clue me IN :frantic:
 

ucvrelics

Colonel
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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
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May 7, 2016
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The leather sleeve was for the Navy model. The naval thinking was the sleeve would protect the metal of the barrel when in reality it made it worse as the moisture got between the leather and the barrel and stayed there.
 

vmicraig

Sergeant
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Location
Mobile, AL
The S&H Navy carbine is a .52 caliber breechloader produced by the Sharps and Hankins Company, Philadelphia. The carbines were made between 1862-1865 with an approximate total of 8,000 produced in 4 variants:

- 19" barrel army cavalry carbine
- 24" barrel army cavalry carbine
- 24" leather covered barrel navy carbine
- 32 3/4" barrel army rifle

By official records, the Navy purchased 6,686 “Navy carbines.” The Navy model bears a 24” barrel that was originally covered in leather to protect against rusting from saltwater spray when used aboard ships. Although many leather covers remain intact in various conditions, the typical Navy carbine is often found with no leather cover, as many rotted off over the years and were never replaced. It was later determined that the leather covers caused more harm than good, trapping the salt and water underneath, resulting in pitting and damage to the barrels. The leather was secured by 2 screws at the breech of the barrel and a band of steel at the muzzle. It was believed to have seen extensive service aboard various vessels which may account for the lack of leather on many surviving models.

The .52 caliber rimfire carbine employed a metal cartridge which was loaded by sliding the barrel forward using a loading lever on the underside, secured by a small latch inside the lever which can be awkward to operate. Standard features include a brass buttplate, iron loading lever, unique hinged sight; the metal forearm is an extension of the block. Carbines had a single strap hook on the butt and a rifled bore with 12 lands & grooves.
 

Peter Stines

Sergeant
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Location
Gulf Coast of Texas
The S&H Navy carbine is a .52 caliber breechloader produced by the Sharps and Hankins Company, Philadelphia. The carbines were made between 1862-1865 with an approximate total of 8,000 produced in 4 variants:

- 19" barrel army cavalry carbine
- 24" barrel army cavalry carbine
- 24" leather covered barrel navy carbine
- 32 3/4" barrel army rifle

By official records, the Navy purchased 6,686 “Navy carbines.” The Navy model bears a 24” barrel that was originally covered in leather to protect against rusting from saltwater spray when used aboard ships. Although many leather covers remain intact in various conditions, the typical Navy carbine is often found with no leather cover, as many rotted off over the years and were never replaced. It was later determined that the leather covers caused more harm than good, trapping the salt and water underneath, resulting in pitting and damage to the barrels. The leather was secured by 2 screws at the breech of the barrel and a band of steel at the muzzle. It was believed to have seen extensive service aboard various vessels which may account for the lack of leather on many surviving models.

The .52 caliber rimfire carbine employed a metal cartridge which was loaded by sliding the barrel forward using a loading lever on the underside, secured by a small latch inside the lever which can be awkward to operate. Standard features include a brass buttplate, iron loading lever, unique hinged sight; the metal forearm is an extension of the block. Carbines had a single strap hook on the butt and a rifled bore with 12 lands & grooves.
Thanks.
 

vmicraig

Sergeant
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Location
Mobile, AL
Here’s a couple Close up leather pics - worse for the wear unfortunately

48643711-2120-4F13-8116-970B3A89CA8B.jpeg


6D223E14-B5DF-4D9C-B5C1-6A9E7D70307B.jpeg


602AEFFE-720E-4C64-98E1-4D3A87406290.jpeg


6BE67325-BB13-4500-B253-A52874EFC2E6.jpeg
 
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