VT Lakeview Cemetery, Burlington, Vermont

lupaglupa

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Set alongside Lake Champlain in Vermont's largest city, Lakeview Cemetery was established in 1867 and designed in the Victorian rural cemetery style. My family paid a visit on Memorial Day weekend and came home with dozens of photos. It will take few days to get them all into this thread.

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The most famous Civil War veteran at Lakeview in General Stannard. His is the only tombstone with a statue on it. Stannard was born in Vermont and first served in the military during the Upper Canada revolt of 1838. He is said to be the first soldier in Vermont to Volunteer for duty in the Civil War. As Lt. Colonel of the 2nd VT Volunteer Infantry he was at the first battle at Bull Run. He was appointed Brigadier General in March of 1863 and led the 2nd VT Brigade during the Gettysburg Campaign. His tombstone records many of his Civil War experiences.

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After the War Stannard worked as a customs official in Vermont until he was appointed Doorkeeper of the US House of Representatives in 1881. He died of pneumonia in Washington, DC in 1886. General Stannard and his wife had four children.
 

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Major General Otis Howard is also buried at Lakeview. A native of Maine, Howard graduated from West Point in 1854. I won't try to summarize all of Howard's service during the War. He lost at arm at Fair Oaks, where his actions later earned him the Medal of Honor. After the War Howard, an ardent abolitionist, headed the Freedman's Bureau for nine years. He was instrumental in the creation of Howard University, which was named in his honor. He served in various posts in the Army until his retirement in 1894, having been in continuous service for 44 years. Howard spent his retirement writing and promoting education. He and his wife Elizabeth had seven children.
 

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Heman Wood Allen, 1844-1915, born in Westford, Vermont. He enlisted in 1862 as a private in Company A, 13th Vermont Volunteers. He mustered out in July of 1863, not long after fighting at Gettysburg. Allen was a banker in Burlington, Vermont. He was killed in an auto accident at the age of 71. Allen was evidently quite proud of his Civil War experience - the back of his tombstone details his 14-month service in great detail.

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Leroy Monroe Bingham, 1845-1911, was born in Fletcher, Vermont. He enlisted in May of 1861 at the age of 16. He mustered in as a private in the 2nd Regiment, Vermont Infantry, Company H. He was wounded in the hip at the Battle of Fredericksburg and spent some months recovering in Vermont before returning to his regiment. In 1864 he was promoted to corporal. He was wounded again at the Battle of the Wilderness when he was shot in the little toe of his right foot. He was discharged while in the hospital recovering in June of 1864 after his three-year term ended. After the War he became a doctor and practiced in Burlington, Vermont.
 

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John D Bowman, 1837-1916, was born on Isle La Motte, Vermont, an island in Lake Champlain between New York and Vermont. He enlisted in 1861. He was a sergeant in the 3rd Vermont Infantry Regiment, Company H. He spent several months in detached service with the ambulance corps in 1863. He mustered out in 1864 at the end of his three-year term of service. After the War he returned to Isle La Motte where he was a farmer and served in the Vermont legislature.
 

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John Henry Brooks, 1837-1930, was born in Albany, New York. He enlisted in June of 1861 as a corporal in the 3rd Vermont Infantry Regiment and was assigned to play in the regimental band. For part of the War he was assigned to carry mail between the regimental headquarters and Washington, DC. He mustered out in August of 1862. After the War Brooks settled along the Canadian border and served as a customs collector. He died at the age of 92 after emergency surgery for a hernia.
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Wilder Luke Burnap, 1839-1905, was born in Canajoharie, New York. In 1862 while a student at Dartmouth College in Providence, Rhode Island, he enlisted in the "College Cavaliers," said to be the only company of Union troops composed solely of college students (formally a part of the 7th RI Cavalry). He served less than four months, mustering out October 1st, 1862. After the War he became a lawyer and moved to Burlington, Vermont where he had a private practice and joined the faculty of the University of Vermont, teaching medical jurisprudence. He died at the age of 65 after a protracted illness, leaving his wife and three sons.
 

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Henry Orville Clark, 1844-1914, was born in Milton, Vermont. He enlisted in the 13th Vermont Infantry Regiment in September of 1862. He served in Company D as a sergeant through July of 1863. After the War Clark moved to New York City where he was a businessman. He retained property in Vermont and was an active member of the 13th Vermont Regimental Association, helping to raise money for the Vermont monument at Gettysburg. Though he lived for several decades in New York and New Jersey, it is said he always claimed Vermont as home. He died suddenly of heart failure at the age of 70.
 

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George Mathnal Farrington, 1844-1932, was born in Plattsburg, New York. He enlisted in August of 1862 in the 13th Vermont Infantry Regiment, Company E. He served through July of 1863. In August of 1864 he reenlisted in the 1st Vermont Cavalry, Company M. He was wounded at Appomattox when a shell hit his left leg, leaving him with a compound fracture. He was discharged with a disability certificate from the hospital in June of 1865. After the War he was a farmer. He died of pneumonia at the age of 88.
 

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Years ago, on humane society business, I was in Burlington. It is an especially glorious spot in a lovely state. These men have a really good spot to rest. Too often the sacrifices made by veterans from northern New England are overlooked. Thank you for those wonderful photographs.
 

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Henry W Farrington, 1839-1920, was born in Plattsburg, New York. He was drafted in July of 1863 at Burlington, Vermont and placed in the 2nd Company of Vermont Drafted Men. He was transferred to the 4th Vermont Infantry Regiment, Company I, in April of 1864. On the 5th of May he suffered a gunshot wound at the Battle of the Wilderness and had part of his right arm amputated; he was sent to Baxter Hospital in Burlington to recover. He remained there until he was discharged as disabled in February of 1865. He returned to farming in the small town of Cambridge, Vermont after the War. Henry died at the age of 80 from chronic bronchitis.

Side note - The two Farrington men above may well be brothers. I could not prove or disprove a link in the time I had. I did not find anyone on Ancestry claiming a link between them but evidence suggests it.
 

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William Quimby Folsom, 1820-1863, was born in Industry, Maine. In the 1860 Census he is listed as a manufacturer of melodeons ( a type of accordion). It may be due to this that he became a musician when he enlisted in the 24th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862, though records show he served as a drummer in Company K. He died of typhoid fever in a regimental hospital April 19, 1863. William's widow and two of his daughters relocated to Burlington, Vermont after the War. When his widow, Mary, died, his name was added to the tombstone.
 

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William Quimby Folsom, 1820-1863, was born in Industry, Maine. In the 1860 Census he is listed as a manufacturer of melodeons ( a type of accordion). It may be due to this that he became a musician when he enlisted in the 24th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862, though records show he served as a drummer in Company K. He died of typhoid fever in a regimental hospital April 19, 1863. William's widow and two of his daughters relocated to Burlington, Vermont after the War. When his widow, Mary, died, his name was added to the tombstone.
Industry, Maine is only a few miles from me. He enlisted on 10 Sept. 1862 and mustered in on 13 Oct 1862 for 9 months in 24th Maine Infantry, Co. K. At the time of his muster, he gave his occupation as "carpenter". Because he was proficient with tenor drums, he was made company musician. He died of fever in Bonne Carre, Louisiana. [MSA service card; History of Industry pp. 349-350]. Accd. to SUV, he's buried in Chalmette National Cemetery in Louisiana--which I hope is as lovely as Burlington!
 
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