Ladies: tips on using the toilet in hoops video-Funny

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WJC

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Bring in a paper/plastic cup with you, face commode, then when finished back out or sideways lady like then find nearest waste receptacle to toss empty cup into :wink:
Thanks for your response. I think....
I had not intended to comment further on this thread. And this comment was not intended to elicit a response. However, your instructions and those of the video have a flaw. Though they seem valid for a chamber pot or 'slop jar', mounting the toilet as shown does not appear historically accurate. None of the toilets I have seen that were in use in 'the old days' were built as an 'island' like today's toilets. They were benches or chairs, often meant to fit in the household setting unobtrusively as just another piece of furniture.
I have seen very old, elaborate toilets sold in the Chinese equivalent of a flea market, whose buyers purchased them as furniture for their living room without realizing what they were buying.
 
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Belle Montgomery

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Thanks for your response. I think....
I had not intended to comment further on this thread. And this comment was not intended to elicit a response. However, your instructions and those of the video have a flaw. Though they seem valid for a chamber pot or 'slop jar', mounting the toilet as shown does not appear historically accurate. None of the toilets I have seen that were in use in 'the old days' were built as an 'island' like today's toilets. They were benches or chairs, often meant to fit in the household setting unobtrusively as just another piece of furniture.
I have seen very old, elaborate toilets sold in the Chinese equivalent of a flea market, whose buyers purchased them as furniture for their living room without realizing what they were buying.
I get your point, this was only a suggestive tips video. Each woman can access her circumstances and adapt. However the woman in this video is very familiar with historical accuracy with an extensive background including being featured in (her husband too) historical documentaries, living history, museum exhibits etc. in the UK. She has a book coming out in 2018 titled "The Victorian Dressmaker"
Thank you for your comment.
 
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Belle Montgomery

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Thanks for your response. I think....
I had not intended to comment further on this thread. And this comment was not intended to elicit a response. However, your instructions and those of the video have a flaw. Though they seem valid for a chamber pot or 'slop jar', mounting the toilet as shown does not appear historically accurate. None of the toilets I have seen that were in use in 'the old days' were built as an 'island' like today's toilets. They were benches or chairs, often meant to fit in the household setting unobtrusively as just another piece of furniture.
I have seen very old, elaborate toilets sold in the Chinese equivalent of a flea market, whose buyers purchased them as furniture for their living room without realizing what they were buying.
You may find this video interesting as well as informative...Dr. Lucy Worsley is the Joint Chief Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces among other things and appears to be well versed in this subject...34 minutes in they show toilets through history:
 
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WJC

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I get your point, this was only a suggestive tips video. Each woman can access her circumstances and adapt. However the woman in this video is very familiar with historical accuracy with an extensive background including being featured in (her husband too) historical documentaries, living history, museum exhibits etc. in the UK. She has a book coming out in 2018 titled "The Victorian Dressmaker"
Thank you for your comment.
Thanks for your response.
An interesting source discussing much of the 'other side' of history is J. C. Furnas, The Americans: A Social History of the United States, 1587-1914. ( New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1969.). For example, the author documents the practice of mothers sewing their children into their clothing during winter months, the belief that wearing flannel clothing to soak up one's persperation rid the body of poisons, the eating habits of Americans over the years and more.
 

diane

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They sure did, and the more we know, the more we can empathize. The issues of dress and toileting are curiosities for us and I, for one, often wonder about the issue of shaving for men. How did they shave without soap if it was in short supply? What about getting their hair cut? It doesn't appear 'buzz cuts' were standard in the day, so did they cut each other's hair, or was there a barber who visited the camps or travelled with them? I'm curious about all these things.
That's why so many had beards! Lee wrote his wife about growing one because it was hard to get a proper shave. I think the officers had body servants to cut their hair. However...here's Lincoln rocking a buzz cut! (It's real - no photo-shopping!)

abe-lincoln-crazy-hair.jpg
 
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Belle Montgomery

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Thank you! I'm going to check it out. History is SO fascinating! Especially daily life. I find it troubling that there are many (can be Googled) more programs and documentaries on the BBC and historians reliving/dissecting history like Lucy Worsely or Ruth Goodman than here in the US. They take their history very serious...hence people protesting Civil War Enactments over here making it a "social" statement rather than appreciating history warts and all. One of my favs is UK celebrities literally spend 24 hours in the past including ALL of the hardships! They do different jobs for a week....the older woman even gets jailed! I can't even imagine ours doing that!!! The show is titled "24 hours in the Past" and is on You Tube also.
 
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Equestriangirl93

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Thank you! I'm going to check it out. History is SO fascinating! Especially daily life. I find it troubling that there are many (can be Googled) more programs and documentaries on the BBC and historians reliving/dissecting history like Lucy Worsely or Ruth Gordon than here in the US. They take their history very serious...hence people protesting Civil War Enactments over here making it a "social" statement rather than appreciating history warts and all. One of my favs is UK celebrities literally spend 24 hours in the past including ALL of the hardships! They do different jobs for a week....the older woman even gets jailed! I can't even imagine ours doing that!!! The show is titled "24 hours in the Past" and is on You Tube also.
That sounds like a great show! I'll have to check it out
 

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I've watched some of those shows and it sure gives you a grand appreciation of the times you live in! :D But what's lewd and crude to one group is everyday to another. When the Forest Service was changing names of places around here they asked local Indians what their name for that was...it was WAY worse than what they were replacing!
 
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I've watched some of those shows and it sure gives you a grand appreciation of the times you live in! :D But what's lewd and crude to one group is everyday to another. When the Forest Service was changing names of places around here they asked local Indians what their name for that was...it was WAY worse than what they were replacing!
The one I mentioned above is one of the toughest! The "celebs" literally go hungry if they don't earn their wage for supper! Liken to the many poor or the newly poor during the Civil War, including newly freed slaves. I've heard many of the soldiers on both sides signed up for food etc. No safety nets back in those days. I can see similarities of the big cities over here doing the same like in this particular series They even have a series titled "Victorian Slum House" that shows the same hardships. Everyone like to view only wealthy Victorians and the poor were even afraid to sleep on the streets for fear of being accosted. At least in the US we had more open land to sleep under a tree or something! ...View attachment 172523 View attachment 172523 but can you imagine sleeping all night like this?:
ropes 2.jpg
ropes.jpg
 

Waterloo50

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The one I mentioned above is one of the toughest! The "celebs" literally go hungry if they don't earn their wage for supper! Liken to the many poor or the newly poor during the Civil War, including newly freed slaves. I've heard many of the soldiers on both sides signed up for food etc. No safety nets back in those days. I can see similarities of the big cities over here doing the same like in this particular series They even have a series titled "Victorian Slum House" that shows the same hardships. Everyone like to view only wealthy Victorians and the poor were even afraid to sleep on the streets for fear of being accosted. At least in the US we had more open land to sleep under a tree or something! ...View attachment 172523 View attachment 172523 but can you imagine sleeping all night like this?:View attachment 172526 View attachment 172527
This is true, I was working on my family tree and I discovered that I had an aunt that ended up in a poor house or work house as they were called back then, she was separated from her children even though they were all in the same building, she was denied all contact with her kids and could be punished for trying to talk to them.
The poor were also made to wear a uniform. This meant that everyone looked the same and everyone outside knew they were poor and lived in the workhouse. Upon entering the workhouse, the poor were stripped and bathed (under supervision). Humiliation was the key, the poor were punished for being poor.
 

Belle Montgomery

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This is true, I was working on my family tree and I discovered that I had an aunt that ended up in a poor house or work house as they were called back then, she was separated from her children even though they were all in the same building, she was denied all contact with her kids and could be punished for trying to talk to them.
The poor were also made to wear a uniform. This meant that everyone looked the same and everyone outside knew they were poor and lived in the workhouse. Upon entering the workhouse, the poor were stripped and bathed (under supervision). Humiliation was the key, the poor were punished for being poor.
Makes me want to lick my ancestor's boots for making the hard trip to the "new world" :dog:
 
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Belle Montgomery

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There are some things that we are better off not knowing and just left to the imagination. Fading to black like in the old movies and seeing the couple eating breakfast in the morning.
Regards
David
Yes but this is for "informative" purposes.
Not an easy trip to make but well worth the effort. If you don't mind me asking, where did your ancestors travel from?
Mother's side Hungary...father's side Czechoslovakia
 
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Nathanb1

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Thank you! I'm going to check it out. History is SO fascinating! Especially daily life. I find it troubling that there are many (can be Googled) more programs and documentaries on the BBC and historians reliving/dissecting history like Lucy Worsely or Ruth Goodman than here in the US. They take their history very serious...hence people protesting Civil War Enactments over here making it a "social" statement rather than appreciating history warts and all. One of my favs is UK celebrities literally spend 24 hours in the past including ALL of the hardships! They do different jobs for a week....the older woman even gets jailed! I can't even imagine ours doing that!!! The show is titled "24 hours in the Past" and is on You Tube also.
Oh, we've had some hilarious shows on PBS...Pioneer House being my favorite! Things did not go well for the city slickers. No surprise...the women adapted better than anyone else. I grew up on a ranch with much older parents (who lived through the depression) who thought I should learn survival skills like milking, handling livestock, butchering, canning, making over things like old skirts into curtains, you name it. I've helped hitch up horses....and my husband and I laughed like idiots at the poor suckers who signed up. Check out PBS' index...those shows are priceless. :bounce:
 

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Well that was interesting to say the least! I did know about the split drawers and imagined that would be handy when powdering your nose with all those frilly layers. Now I'm curious how difficult it would be to face the toilet in the opposite direction...hmm...:whistling:

Thanks for sharing @Belle Montgomery! I'm off to check out the Lucy Worsley video - love her shows and books! :thumbsup:
 
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