Just bought Musket

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I have found out though there may be a cartridge in the barrel. There is definitely paper, about 2 inches of something in there.
If you drop the ramrod in with a little force you should hear a metallic clink. If it is a solid thump without the rod bouncing back out of the muzzle a little then the musket is probably still loaded.
 

RSMorris

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If you drop the ramrod in with a little force you should hear a metallic clink. If it is a solid thump without the rod bouncing back out of the muzzle a little then the musket is probably still loaded.

I don't hear a metallic clink, I feel paper. I shined a light and there is definitely paper in there. Don't know yet what is behind the paper.
 

James N.

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2. I don't know if it is a Civil War musket (either side) but the heavy wear would make one think so. Opinions?

... I am sure I will have other questions once I receive it. I know it will never fire again I just liked it for the rough look. Looks like it has a few tales to tell.
Since no one has discussed this part of your OP I will - indeed, it should have many tales to tell!

These were hands down the most common and available shoulder arm on both sides in 1861. (In the very earliest engagements some units like the 20th Tennessee were even armed with unconverted flintlocks at Mill Springs/Logan's Crossroads in Kentucky in January, 1862.) Although they were steadily being replaced by more modern later models throughout the war some remained in service for the duration, though at the end mainly by home-guard or militia-type organizations. They remained in service longer in the Western and Trans-Mississippi Theaters than back East, particularly among Confederates, and were especially prominent at early war battles like First Bull Run/Manassas, Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge, Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Perryville, and Stones River. In the North they fairly quickly became considered second-rate weapons and were often used to arm the first contingents of United States Colored Troops or USCT.
 
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James N.

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I don't hear a metallic clink, I feel paper. I shined a light and there is definitely paper in there. Don't know yet what is behind the paper.
Have you tried to draw the ramrod yet? They were originally threaded on the end to accept a screw-on appendage called a wiper which looked like a miniature corkscrew that was used alternately to hold cleaning patches or wads to oil the bore or withdraw trash like is in yours:

IMG_0292.jpg


The one on the right is for the smaller-caliber rifles of the Civil War era.
 

Story

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First off, you've got a nice one. I would be happy to hang that on my wall - Congrats.

I have some thoughts on the color of the wood and the area around the nipple. I'm an old wood guy, been restoring antiques for a long time now. The stock is lighter then it should be, I'm fairly confident your rifle stock has been cleaned - possibly with bleach.

I'd buy that theory for a dollar. I've used oven cleaner (lye based) to force the scum out of the pores of 20th century military surplus rifle stocks.
 
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RSMorris

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Have you tried to draw the ramrod yet? They were originally threaded on the end to accept a screw-on appendage called a wiper which looked like a miniature corkscrew that was used alternately to hold cleaning patches or wads to oil the bore or withdraw trash like is in yours:

View attachment 410026

The one on the right is for the smaller-caliber rifles of the Civil War era.

That was how I found it had something in it. When I lowered there was no metallic clink. It felt mushy like paper. I shined a bore light down there and you can see the paper. I am going to try real carefully to pull it out. Don't know how long it has been in there. or exactly what it is.
 

RSMorris

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It might have been someone on CWT in another thread, but I remember reading that the chemical compound used by the Confederates in their percussion caps was INCREDIBLY corrosive.

I've heard that same thing.
 

RSMorris

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Since no one has discussed this part of your OP I will - indeed, it should have many tales to tell!

These were hands down the most common and available shoulder arm on both sides in 1861. (In the very earliest engagements some units like the 20th Tennessee were even armed with unconverted flintlocks at Mill Springs/Logan's Crossroads in Kentucky in January, 1862.) Although they were steadily being replaced by more modern later models throughout the war some remained in service for the duration, though at the end mainly by home-guard or militia-type organizations. They remained in service longer in the Western and Trans-Mississippi Theaters than back East, particularly among Confederates, and were especially prominent at early war battles like First Bull Run/Manassas, Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge, Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Perryville, and Stones River. In the North they fairly quickly became considered second-rate weapons and were often used to arm the first contingents of United States Colored Troops or USCT.

Thanks, I would like to think mine was in the war. Don't have anything yet to prove it.
 

RSMorris

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Thanks, I like it either way, but it would be cool if it was. I am a rebel at heart, but if it was used by the north that would be cool to... Just interesting knowing it could have been there.
 

RSMorris

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Am making a display. Have some cartridges, caps and roundball to go on the shelf when they arrive. Also have an original middle band on the way this musket is missing. It's funny to me, this musket is really dark when photographed from a short distance, but when up close, it appears much lighter. Even looking in person it is much darker than photographed.

Unknown.jpeg
 

Story

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Am making a display. Have some cartridges, caps and roundball to go on the shelf when they arrive.
Looks good. You could get one of those nice little wood frames (or shadowboxes to include the items above) from craft stores and print out on parchment paper (long ways horizontal) the simple facts for visitors in a period-appropriate font.

.69 caliber Pomeroy Model 1829
Made under a contract issued in 1829 with an 1836 dated lockplate.
Also known as a
Model 1816, Type III or an 1822/28.
Inspection stamps by JH (Joseph Hannis) and HKC (Henry K. Craig).
Pre- Civil War Manufactured by the Federal Government
Possibly used by the Confederate Forces
during the War of Northern Aggression
 

RSMorris

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Joined
Jul 3, 2020
Looks good. You could get one of those nice little wood frames (or shadowboxes to include the items above) from craft stores and print out on parchment paper (long ways horizontal) the simple facts for visitors in a period-appropriate font.

.69 caliber Pomeroy Model 1829
Made under a contract issued in 1829 with an 1836 dated lockplate.
Also known as a
Model 1816, Type III or an 1822/28.
Inspection stamps by JH (Joseph Hannis) and HKC (Henry K. Craig).
Pre- Civil War Manufactured by the Federal Government
Possibly used by the Confederate Forces
during the War of Northern Aggression
I am actually working up draft very similar to what you wrote. Was going to have it engraved then mounted to a wooden plaque onto the shelf.
 

James N.

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Am making a display. Have some cartridges, caps and roundball to go on the shelf when they arrive. Also have an original middle band on the way this musket is missing. It's funny to me, this musket is really dark when photographed from a short distance, but when up close, it appears much lighter. Even looking in person it is much darker than photographed.

View attachment 410112
Be careful - things like this have a tendency to REPRODUCE:

IM000592.JPG
 
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