June 1875: "Kansas Liberates Her Last Slave!"


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O' Be Joyful

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Use-ta be: Zinn-zä-nätti o-HI-o The BIG city.
#4
Thanks for sharing this. One wonders how many others were unaware for some time of the developments in Washington.
I fully agree, it does cause one to wonder how closely some folks kept up with events going on about them and beyond.

It also causes me to wonder aloud, for the first time, why posts from the Reconstruction forum are no longer showing up on the Homepage. I have found them to be a very valuable resource for learning about less talked about, and sometimes uncomfortable subjects, but I do not understand why they are being hidden away. If I did not have the forum on alert I would never have known this post even existed, as it is also hard to find in the Dusty Road section.

I know that @John Hartwell-- & esp. @Pat Young here in Reconstruction--put in a great deal of effort to bring us these stories of the mostly unsung of that era, and I feel it is a terrible loss for all, that they are now limited for view to those that must hunt and peck for them.
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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#7
If these few made the news, wonder how many more there were? And how awful. Losing all those years! If you're not going to pay someone for their contributions by way of labor, do it yourself.

Personally, I never go to any specific Forum in CWT, but always directly to the "New Posts" page, which directs me to all forums that have had new posts since my last visit. Since I visit frequently (3 or more times a day) I will miss relatively few posts of interest.

Won't tell you how many years I was a member before noticing there was a home page. Pretty funny. ' New Posts ' is generally how I notice threads although still miss a lot.
 

John Hartwell

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#8
If these few made the news, wonder how many more there were? And how awful. Losing all those years! If you're not going to pay someone for their contributions by way of labor, do it yourself.
There are quite a few others, particularly from the border states. I imagine it would have been harder to pull off in states that had been under military occupation.

There is even one from Delaware, of a woman and her daughter kept enslaved until September, 1868. They sued for wages owed, and won. The long article from the Chicago Inter-Ocean [June 1, 1869] makes no pretense of impartiality:
hjkmk.jpg

etc., etc., etc.​
The defendant was represented by U. S. Senator James F. Bayard, who tried to have the case dismissed on the grounds that according to Delaware state law, a black person could not bring suit against a white man. But, the Court ruled that the 14th Amendment had negated the state law.
 
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