Julian Carr's Speech at the Declaration of "Silent Sam" - An Excerpt

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Brendan

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"The present generation, I am persuaded, scarcely takes note of what the Confederate soldier meant to the welfare of the Anglo Saxon race during the four years immediately succeeding the war, when the facts are, that their courage and steadfastness saved the very life of the Anglo Saxon race in the South – When 'the bottom rail was on top' all over the Southern states, and to-day, as a consequence the purest strain of the Anglo Saxon is to be found in the 13 Southern States – Praise God.

"I trust I may be pardoned for one allusion, howbeit it is rather personal. One hundred yards from where we stand, less than ninety days perhaps after my return from Appomattox, I horse-whipped a negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds, because upon the streets of this quiet village she had publicly insulted and maligned a Southern lady, and then rushed for protection to these University buildings where was stationed a garrison of 100 Federal soldiers. I performed the pleasing duty in the immediate presence of the entire garrison, and for thirty nights afterwards slept with a double-barrel shot gun under my head."

-Julian Carr, “Unveiling of Confederate Monument at University. June 2, 1913.” Full transcript here: http://hgreen.people.ua.edu/transcription-carr-speech.html
 

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"The present generation, I am persuaded, scarcely takes note of what the Confederate soldier meant to the welfare of the Anglo Saxon race during the four years immediately succeeding the war, when the facts are, that their courage and steadfastness saved the very life of the Anglo Saxon race in the South – When 'the bottom rail was on top' all over the Southern states, and to-day, as a consequence the purest strain of the Anglo Saxon is to be found in the 13 Southern States – Praise God.

"I trust I may be pardoned for one allusion, howbeit it is rather personal. One hundred yards from where we stand, less than ninety days perhaps after my return from Appomattox, I horse-whipped a negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds, because upon the streets of this quiet village she had publicly insulted and maligned a Southern lady, and then rushed for protection to these University buildings where was stationed a garrison of 100 Federal soldiers. I performed the pleasing duty in the immediate presence of the entire garrison, and for thirty nights afterwards slept with a double-barrel shot gun under my head."

-Julian Carr, “Unveiling of Confederate Monument at University. June 2, 1913.” Full transcript here: http://hgreen.people.ua.edu/transcription-carr-speech.html
So the confederate soldiers honored by the statue are the ones who joined the KKK and other white supremacist terrorist groups during Reconstruction to murder, rape, and beat blacks and white Republicans. It was those confederate soldiers who ensured white supremacy after the Civil War.
 
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Bee

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Julian S. Carr
Courtesy of the North Carolina Collection at UNC.

It might interest some to learn, for example, that Julian Shakespeare Carr (1845-1924), a native of Chapel Hill, was responsible for much more than that speech. He is considered one of the greatest industrialists in southern history, and, but for James Buchanan Duke, arguably the most important entrepreneur in North Carolina’s pre-1900 history. He was integrally involved in virtually every aspect of the state’s modernization in the late 19th century—tobacco, textiles, banking, railroads, public utilities and education.


Read more here: https://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article175617056.html#storylink=cpy
 
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So you're saying that Silent Sam wasn't placed in Chapel Hill to honor the Confederate soldiers? How does this quote show that? What is the point?

If that is what you are saying, that is a reach to say the least.
Read again what Carr said: "The present generation, I am persuaded, scarcely takes note of what the Confederate soldier meant to the welfare of the Anglo Saxon race during the four years immediately succeeding the war, when the facts are, that their courage and steadfastness saved the very life of the Anglo Saxon race in the South – When “the bottom rail was on top” all over the Southern states, and to-day, as a consequence the purest strain of the Anglo Saxon is to be found in the 13 Southern States."

Carr is saying the monument is there to honor confederate soldiers who participated in white supremacist terrorism after the war.

At the end of the speech, Carr says, "Again, dear Daughters of the Confederacy, I thank you in the name of the eighteen hundred brave, loyal, patriotic, home-loving young student soldiers who went out from this grand old University to battle for our Southern rights and Southern liberties, five hundred of whom never came back."

So Carr is saying confederate soldiers fought to preserve slavery, and the right to have slaves.
 
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Andersonh1

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Julian Carr was not the only speaker, nor the keynote speaker. I've been doing some digging on the dedication, and Governor Locke Craig got top honors. The other speeches focus on duty and honor and remembering the dead, so I think the Carr quote is being cherry-picked here to cast things in the worst possible light.

Image9.jpg
 
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Andersonh1

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Julian S. Carr
Courtesy of the North Carolina Collection at UNC.

It might interest some to learn, for example, that Julian Shakespeare Carr (1845-1924), a native of Chapel Hill, was responsible for much more than that speech. He is considered one of the greatest industrialists in southern history, and, but for James Buchanan Duke, arguably the most important entrepreneur in North Carolina’s pre-1900 history. He was integrally involved in virtually every aspect of the state’s modernization in the late 19th century—tobacco, textiles, banking, railroads, public utilities and education.


Read more here: https://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article175617056.html#storylink=cpy
“People are more than the worst thing they have done in their lives.”

A good reminder to look at the entirety of someone's life when we're trying to understand who they were.
 

19thGeorgia

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Julian Carr was not the only speaker, nor the keynote speaker. I've been doing some digging on the dedication, and Governor Locke Craig got top honors. The other speeches focus on duty and honor and remembering the dead, so I think the Carr quote is being cherry-picked here to cast things in the worst possible light.
Edited; modern politics



This is from the Governor's speech-

“Ours is the task to build a State worthy of all patriotism and heroic deeds, a State that demands justice for herself and all her people, a State sounding with the music of victorious industry, a State whose awakened conscience shall lead the State to evolve from the forces of progress a new social order, with finer development for all conditions and classes of our people.” (Charlotte Observer, June 3, 1913)
 
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Andersonh1

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Yes, some academic folk cherry-picked a few sections out of one speech (out of a total of five speeches) to promote the destruction of a Confederate monument.
Agreed. To accurately determine the theme of the day and the reason for the monument's existence, all the speeches should be reviewed and common elements put forward. In addition, the committee chair is, out of all the speakers, the one best qualified to tell us why they commissioned the monument and therefore what its purpose was.
 
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