CS Con -Johnson, Herschel V. - C.S. Senator, GA

Herschel Vespasian Johnson:
:CSA1stNat:
Born: September 18, 1812
Johnson.jpg

Birthplace: Farmer’s Bridge in Burke County Georgia
Father: Moses Johnson
Mother: Nancy Palmer 1786 – 1855
(Buried: Hopeful Baptist Church Dyes Crossroad Georgia)

Wife: Ann Fromentine Polk 1809 – 1884
(Buried: Louisville City Cemetery Louisville Georgia)

Children:
Tallulah Johnson Horne 1840 – 1925
(Buried: West Hill Cemetery Dalton Georgia)
Captain Tomlinson Fort Johnson Sr. 1846 – 1919
(Buried: Bonaventure Cemetery Savannah Georgia)


Political Party: Democratic Party

Education:

1834: Graduated from University of Georgia

Occupation before War:
1839: Moved to his plantation Sandy Grove in Jefferson County
1839 – 1844: Attorney in Louisville Georgia
1843: Unsuccessful Candidate for United States Congressman
1844: Democratic Party Presidential Elector
1844 – 1848: Attorney in Milledgeville Georgia
1847: Unsuccessful Candidate for Governor of Georgia
1848: appointed to U.S. Senate to fill vacancy of Walter T. Colquitt
1848 – 1849: United States Senator from Georgia
Death.jpg

1849: Choose not to be a candidate for election to fill vacancy
1849 – 1853: Judge of Ocmulgee Circuit Superior Court
1852: Democratic Party Presidential Elector
1853 – 1857: Governor of Georgia
1857 – 1861: Attorney and Plantation Owner in Louisville Georgia
1860: Unsuccessful Democratic Party Vice – Presidential Candidate

Civil War Career:
1861: Delegate to Georgia State Secession Convention
1863 – 1865: Confederate States Senator from Georgia
1863: Joined the Confederate States Senate on January 19th​.
1863: Proposed constitutional amendment permitting nullification
1863 – 1864: Member of Senate Finance Committee
1863: Temporary Member of Senate Post Offices and Post Roads
1863 – 1865: Member of Senate Naval Affairs Committee
1864: Member of Senate Foreign Affairs Committee
Disliked most of the Davis Administration Programs
He was known for his skills for compromise even in emergency
He supported Higher taxes but he would accept them only on income
He saw a need for impressment
1863: Proposed impossible restrictions on impressment operation.
Worked to improve the army but opposed conscription
He was against inflation control, arming the slaves and suspending the writ of habeas corpus
Was a leader in plotting for an honorable peace.
1865: Worked for reconstruction with only the guarantee that slavery would be recognized

Occupation after War:
1865: President of Georgia State Constitutional Convention
1865 – 1873: Attorney in Louisville Georgia
1866: Presented credentials to serve as US Senator but not allowed.
1873 – 1880: Judge of Georgia Middle Circuit Court



Died: August 16, 1880
Place of Death: Sandy Grove Plantation Louisville Georgia
Age at time of Death: 67 years old
Burial Place: Louisville City Cemetery Louisville Georgia
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
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Nov 8, 2018
Location
Palm Coast, Florida
He was against inflation control, arming the slaves and suspending the writ of habeas corpus
Was a leader in plotting for an honorable peace.
1865: Worked for reconstruction with only the guarantee that slavery would be recognized
I've read up stuff like this in Bruce Levine's "Confederate Emancipation". There was a large faction of Confederate firebrands who thought they could negotiate to keep slavery in exchange for defecting to the Union. Of course, the Union wasn't in the mood for that kinda stuff when they marched into the Carolinas in 1865. Its one of the reason I have little love for the planters...at least those who aren't on the frontline getting shot.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
I never really gave it much thought as to who Stephen Douglas had as a running mate in 1860. Plus he's the guy who filled Toombs' Senate seat in 1863. Not sure of the details yet and need to do a little research. Pretty sure it had something to do with Toombs' being away from Congress as a Brigadier General and his resignation.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Actually it was a man named John Wood Lewis who filled Toombs' seat on April 7, 1862 when Toombs refused or declined to the Confederate Congress. Herschel Johnson then took this seat in the following election. I am sorry for the confusion, I am reading several different biographys and am getting conflicting information and still probably got it wrong??
 

gentlemanrob

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Apr 11, 2016
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South Carolina
Actually it was a man named John Wood Lewis who filled Toombs' seat on April 7, 1862 when Toombs refused or declined to the Confederate Congress. Herschel Johnson then took this seat in the following election. I am sorry for the confusion, I am reading several different biographys and am getting conflicting information and still probably got it wrong??
He filled the Senate Seat of John Wood Lewis. Toombs was never a senator for the Confederacy.
 
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