John Quincy Adams ... Predicted Dissolution... Over Slavery...

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5fish

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John Quincy Adams our 6th President of our United States predicted the dissolution of our nation and Civil War. He was a harden Abolitionist before they became vogue in history. He, unlike Lincoln, consider slavery an abomination. He gets no applause for his moral stance against slavery or his prophecy of civil war. He was ahead of his time...

Adams argued that slavery was immoral, a violation of the principles on which the nation was founded, namely, that all men are created equal. His opposition to slavery also made him an opponent of the annexation of Texas and the Mexican-American War. He argued that both could eventually lead to the division of the nation and Civil War. After winning reelection to Congress on one occasion he said that he would endeavor to “bring about a day prophesied when slavery and war shall be banished from the face of the earth.” Time and again he condemned “false and heartless doctrine which makes the first and holiest rights of humanity to depend upon the color of the skin.” Historians have argued that not only did Adams predict the coming of the Civil War, but his ardent arguments in favor of abolition helped bring it about.

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Early in the 19th century, John Quincy Adams, our sixth president, had become convinced that slavery would destroy the Union. Slavery would be ended, he came to believe, only through a civil war. The emancipation schemes his contemporaries proposed, including voluntary immigration of free blacks and emancipated slaves to a nation of their own, seemed to him impractical and unjust. He refused to support the American Colonization Society. Lincoln, who also abhorred slavery as a moral crime, put all his hopes in the Colonization Society. Adams thought it absurd to suppose that free blacks would immigrate voluntarily to Africa or those slave owners would ever cooperate in emancipation. Convinced that slavery would not be the rock against which the nation split, Lincoln believed the South would not succumb to the folly of secession. Adams knew the Southern mind better, having observed its uncompromising, quasi-violent character day after day in Congress from 1833 to 1848. By temperament and willful self-delusion, Lincoln hoped (until the reality was forced upon him) that good sense and the “better angels of our nature” would prevail. Over time, slavery would be eliminated peacefully. Adams never believed that possible. There were no “better angels.”


... John Quincy Adams and Lincoln shared views excep0t one...

Adams worked mostly from the outside, by personality outspoken and a radical; Lincoln from inside, a consensus politician who met his destiny when conciliation was no longer possible. On matters of policy (a national bank, paper money, trade, education, infrastructure, manufacturing, and the proper balance between federal and state power), they were, with the exception of how to deal with slavery, entirely in agreement.

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Lincoln was not Adams equal on slavery...

For John Quincy Adams, all this would have seemed a recognition of the inevitable. For abolitionists such as Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and H. Ford Douglas, Lincoln’s journey toward the place they had long occupied seemed painfully slow.

... He was right on Oregon and knew the truth behind the Mexican American war a land grab ...wiki

Adams opposed the annexation of Texas, viewing as unconstitutional the imposition of U.S. citizenship on foreign nationals when those nationals did not hold a referendum.[93] Adams once called for the impeachment of President John Tyler.[94] Adams called for the annexation of the entirety of Oregon Country, a disputed region occupied by both the United States and Britain, and was disappointed when President James K. Polk signed the Oregon Treaty, which divided the land between the two claimants at the 49th parallel.[95] Adams became a strong critic of the Mexican–American War, which he saw as a war of aggression against Mexico that was designed to take Mexican territory.[96] Although the war was popular at first, many Whigs eventually opposed it.[97]


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Adams continued to speak against what he called the "Slave Power", that is the organized political power of the slave owners who dominated all the southern states and their representation in Congress.[104] He was also a fierce critic of northern Representatives and Senators, in particular Stephen A. Douglas, who he accused of catering to the slave faction in exchange for southern support.[5] He vehemently attacked the annexation of Texas and the Mexican–American War as part of a "conspiracy" to extend slavery.[105] He correctly predicted that the annexation of Texas and the Mexican–American War would contribute to civil war.[5]

...
As Lincoln believed in science... wiki

Adams realized that this might allow the United States to realize his dream of building a national institution of science and learning. Adams thus became Congress's primary supporter of the future Smithsonian Institution.[106]


Adams successfully persuaded Congress to preserve the money for an institution of science and learning.[5] Congress also debated whether the federal government had the authority to accept the gift, though with Adams leading the initiative, Congress decided to accept the legacy bequeathed to the nation and pledged the faith of the United States to the charitable trust on July 1, 1836.[108

All the links:::

http://sageamericanhistory.net/jacksonian/topics/jqadamspresidency.html

https://lithub.com/abraham-lincoln-breaking-down-the-myth-of-a-perfect-president/






 
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