Jefferson Davis Fathered Métis Children?

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#1
A little known fact: During Jefferson Davis' time serving in the U.S. Army in what is now Wisconsin he fathered two Métis children, "a son named Joesph J. Davis by a Menominee Indian girl named Wa Ne Ne Me Quaw, and a daughter Louise with Phoebe Ducharme."

"Joseph Davis had no children by his first two wives but three children by his third wife, Mary Ke She Na: Gabriel; Paul; and Jane Wau Poose. Joseph Davis may have had another child, Polly, by Yah Me Tah Pa; Polly married a Lyons and had a large family in Oconto County WI. Joseph fought in the Union Army against the Confederacy, whose president was his father."

~ From page 232 of the book "The Wisconsin Creoles"

Plan of Fort Winnebago drawn 1830 by Lt. Jefferson Davis, later President of the Confederate States of America. Davis also helped build Fort Winnebago.
 
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James N.

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#3
Welcome, Charles de Langlade! I certainly have encountered that name while studying the French and Indian War in the aftermath of working on Last of the Mohicans back in 1991. I had the honor to portray the commander of Marquis de Montcalm's Garde d'Honneur.
 

DixieRifles

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#5
One descendant of Jefferson Davis was Bertram Hayes Davis, the great-great grandson of the president of the Confederate States. He was the Chairman(or whatever) of Beauvoir until there was a falling out. I have heard him talk once where he mentioned his lineage. I may not have this right but this is how I understood it.

During the funeral procession or viewing for President Jefferson Davis, one member of the Davis family members noted that there was no one to carry on the DAVIS name. Right there, one of his daughters decided to name her son after him.
This is what I find in the genealogy sites.

Jefferson Finis DAVIS (b: 1807/8, Fairview, KY --- d: 1889, New Orleans, LA)

Child: Margaret Howell DAVIS (1855-1909) married Joel Addison HAYES, Jr. (1848-1919)

Grandson: Jefferson Addison HAYES-DAVIS (1884-1975)

This name carried on until Bertram Hayes Davis.


DAVIS Geneaology Sites:

https://jeffersondavis.rice.edu/Genealogy.aspx

http://dgmweb.net/JeffDavisHome.html


Another little known fact about Jefferson Davis as Secretary of War:
On March 3, 1853, Congress appropriated $150,000 and authorized Secretary of War Jefferson Davis “to Ascertain the Most Practical and Economical Route for a Railroad From the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean.” Davis ordered Brevet Captain George B. McClellan and the Corps of Topographical Engineers, a division in the United States Army, established to “discover, open up, and make accessible the American West,” to fulfill this obligation.
Jefferson Davis signed many of the documents related to the funding for the exploration of the transcontinential railroad.
 

diane

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#7
That's interesting indeed! Could be - a number of soldiers had Indian kids. But, I wonder. There was a family here who for generations believed they were descended from U S Grant. DNA showed they were descended from Grant all right but not U S. Their ancestor was also stationed at Ft Humboldt and named Grant, but was no relation to Ulysses.
 

godofredus

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#8
Plan of Fort Winnebago drawn 1830 by Lt. Jefferson Davis, later President of the Confederate States of America. Davis also helped build Fort Winnebago.

A little know fact: During Jefferson Davis' time in what is now Wisconsin he fathered two Métis children, "a son named Joesph J. by a Menominee Indian girl named Wa Ne Ne Me Quaw, and a daughter Louise with Phoebe Ducharme."

"Joseph Davis had no children by his first two wives but three children by his third wife, Mary Ke She Na: Gabriel; Paul; and Jane Wau Poose. Joseph Davis may have had another child, Polly, by Yah Me Tah Pa; Polly married a Lyons and had a large family in Oconto County WI. Joseph fought in the Union Army against the Confederacy, whose president was his father."

~ From page 232 of the book "The Wisconsin Creoles"
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Interesting stuff. Couldn't find anything on Davis marrying (or fathering) children by native Americans.
Are you sure you haven't confused Davis with Pickett?:
http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Pickett_George_E_1825-1875#start_entry
 
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#9
Welcome, Charles de Langlade! I certainly have encountered that name while studying the French and Indian War in the aftermath of working on Last of the Mohicans back in 1991. I had the honor to portray the commander of Marquis de Montcalm's Garde d'Honneur.
Smiling! My 8th Great Grandfather, Charles de Langlade is known as "The Father of Wisconsin" although he died in 1801 in French speaking La Baye. The Americans didn't take control of the Great Lakes - Michigan Territory from Canada until after the War of 1812, with the 1815 Treaty of Ghent. Wisconsin didn't become a state until 1848.

Among the Odawa, Langlade was known as Aukewingeketawso meaning "Defender of his Country." There are no known images of Charles Langlade, so I thought Aldo Raines matched him best, both Metis , both feared leaders, both took many scalps. :wink:
 
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#10
Interesting stuff. Couldn't find anything on Davis marrying (or fathering) children by native Americans.
Are you sure you haven't confused Davis with Pickett?:
http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Pickett_George_E_1825-1875#start_entry
I'm sure. I found this site specifically to share info that seems to have been whitewashed from history. I'll share more I've found on Davis while he served in the U.S. Army at Fort Crawford which, at Prairie du Chien, shared with Fort Snelling at the Falls of St. Anthony the task of guarding the frontier of the Upper Mississippi.
 
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#12
That's interesting indeed! Could be - a number of soldiers had Indian kids. But, I wonder. There was a family here who for generations believed they were descended from U S Grant. DNA showed they were descended from Grant all right but not U S. Their ancestor was also stationed at Ft Humboldt and named Grant, but was no relation to Ulysses.
The vast majority of that area was French speaking Metis or "Mixed" people who referred to themselves as Creole, mostly loyal to Quebec. Some of the "White" (Only Americans were called "White") soldiers from the War of 1812 took native wives and stayed, one of my children's ancestors on their mother side was a U.S. soldier from Kentucky during the War of 1812, he stayed and married a girl with native blood. I'll share his photo, and story of a deer hunting trip he went on with Jefferson Davis while Davis was at Fort Howard. (Green Bay) I'm quite confident the records are true, but I'll keep digging for more info. Not sure any DNA could be matched based on Davis' few admitted offspring.
 
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Joined
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#13
That's interesting indeed! Could be - a number of soldiers had Indian kids. But, I wonder. There was a family here who for generations believed they were descended from U S Grant. DNA showed they were descended from Grant all right but not U S. Their ancestor was also stationed at Ft Humboldt and named Grant, but was no relation to Ulysses.
I'm guessing, but I suspect his native descendants may not be proud of their ancestor. Not interested in pushing it.
 

diane

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#15
The vast majority of that area was French speaking Metis or "Mixed" people who referred to themselves as Creole, mostly loyal to Quebec. Some of the "White" (Only Americans were called "White") soldiers from the War of 1812 took native wives and stayed, one of my children's ancestors on their mother side was a U.S. soldier from Kentucky during the War of 1812, he stayed and married a girl with native blood. I'll share his photo, and story of a deer hunting trip he went on with Jefferson Davis while Davis was at Fort Howard. (Green Bay) I'm quite confident the records are true, but I'll keep digging for more info. Not sure any DNA could be matched based on Davis' few admitted offspring.
It's a difficult thing to prove, and as you mention, sometimes one side or the other doesn't want to admit the relationship. My maternal great-great-grandfather was Huron/Cherokee born in New France. We assume it was Quebec but that name encompassed a huge area! He was captain in a unit from Nova Scotia who were sent out to the California/Oregon territories to keep peace between Indians and fur trappers. It's an intriguing study!

Some of the soldiers who had Indian families did claim them - like George Pickett - and others neglected them - like Phil Sheridan. It wasn't done to claim your mixed race offspring. O O Howard shocked people at a dinner when he declared any soldier who married an Indian woman then abandoned her to marry a white one was a bigamist!
 


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